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Spoiled: ES335 vs Stratocaster


RudyH

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I started playing my Stratocaster again and observed something I never noticed before: It just doesn't sound good when played acoustically (ie no amplification). I think I'm spoiled after playing the ES335 and Variax. The Strat sounds great when played through an amp though.

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I started playing my Stratocaster again and observed something I never noticed before: It just doesn't sound good when played acoustically (ie no amplification). I think I'm spoiled after playing the ES335 and Variax. The Strat sounds great when played through an amp though.

 

Hmmm...a solid body electric that doesn't sound good acoustic. =D>

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Cruznolfart' date=' Two diffrent avaitars and both cartoons shaking their *** at me

 

I gotta give you a Hmmmm

 

Just kidding I like this one better then the cat, the cat was kinda creapy[/quote']

 

LOL! I forget, you gotta be careful where you shake it around here.

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I wasn't intending it as a joke. I have a Variax 700 that sounds fine acoustically all up and down the neck.

 

I didn't think you were joking, RudyH, and I mean no disrespect. I'm just not someone who puts a lot of weight on the acoustic properties of solid-body electrics. I could be wrong but I'd bet they're never evaluated by the manufacturer for their acoustic properties. I know they have different voices, some more "acoustic" than others. But count me as one of those people who believes electric solid-body guitars are more reliant upon things OTHER than their acoustic properties in the performance of their task.

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Every guitar has different response to string vibration and that type of instrument - heck, each individual instrument - offers some degree of "control" over the string vibration. I think Leo Fender or whoever helped design the Strat and others of the early Fender stable wasn't really thinking much of specific acoustic qualities. OTOH, I don't think the degree of thought went into the SG, Melodymaker or LP Jr that went into the LP, either, and they're all solid.

 

I'd like to know what some of the guys designing those early solidbodies were thinking beyond marketability or even playability in terms of instrumental technique.

 

Still... I've got a board guitar but even with good amps and fancy electronics, I don't feel as "connected" to the sound as I do on a decent archtop, even a semi-hollow one, or almost any kind of pickup or mike on a flattop or classical.

 

It's interesting, though, how many solidbody players nowadays especially want to add various electronic "stuff" to their guitars as if the guitar itself weren't enough. That's understandable at times you might want to use the guitar to mimic a B-3 Hammond or shape the sound to be a "piano," but... for real "guitar," regardless of style... I think the solidbody lacks some undefined "depth." But then, the semi-hollow feeds back less and the solid has even less of the "problem."

 

Different strokes for different folks. But I think it was a huge mistake regardless to swap out my early 70s orange Gretch for a Guild S100c back in the olden days.

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I've learned a long time ago that the first tone evaluation I would do with a guitar would be unplugged - I'm talking about guitars in general.

 

Not because I'd be playing it unplugged (well, eventualy) but because it is the first hint with the tone. The tone is all there, you just push it through your pickups and amplifier. So when I plug it, I already know kinda how it's gonna sound. Strats, Teles, Gretschs, 335, SGs they all sound different unplugged - well, every guitar sounds different.

 

If that was really what you were talking about...

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