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Juke50

Tube amp for home use?

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Hi, I currently use a Blackstar HT1R tube amp for home use, are there any other small tube amps that are suitable to play at low volumes, or do I already own the best solution?

 

Thank you.

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In the bang for the buck (features, and options) wise, I think that's a good choice for sure.

 

But then again, a lot depends on what you are looking for, the style of music you're playing most of the time, and the tones you're trying to get.

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You might look at the Vox 4 watt. Nice little amp that goes down to 1 wt and would be a different voice from your Blackstar.

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"Best" is for you to determine :)

 

In addition to an HT5R, I have a Bugera V22 and a Laney IRT Studio. The HT5 and V22 have been pretty silent since getting the IRT Studio. It has an input that drives the amp to 15W and another that limits to 1W max. 3 channels, direct out with switchable speaker emulation, some cool reamping capabilities.

 

All of these were chosen specifically for their quality sound at reasonable home/studio volume. The IRT Studio is my favorite. Next is the V22. Now that I have the Laney, the HT5 will likely be traded at some point.

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I have a Laney L5T-112 that I really like. I replaced the EL84 with an EL844 and changed the 12AX7's with 12AU7 NOS Mullards. The EL844 is a little lower volume, around 4 watts, and a direct replacement for an EL84. The newer Laney L5T with the digital reverb is not made in the UK except for the first few. The older L5T made in the UK has a nice spring reverb. The cleans are Fenderish and the gain is Marshallish.

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+1. Attenuators are great. I used mine daily with my old Fender Twin. Being able to crank a Twin up to 6 or 7 without losing your hearing is a wonderful thing [biggrin]

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I know it's not a real tube amp, but do yourself a real big favour and investigate the Yamaha THR series. They are truly remarkable. I opted for the THRc, described as the ' boutique' amps version, and after 7 months it's still getting even better as I learn how to tune each amp to achieve different sounds. Coupled with the great and simple on- board effects, It is simple plug in and play for fantastic tones. I've heard some complaints that 1- it's not loud enough to gig with(?) and 2- some amp models aren't very useable.

In response to 1- that's not the reason for a home amp now really ,is it? ( BTW, it gets loud enough to be too loud for a home practice amp)

And 2- I don't think that anyone who has spent more than a couple of hours with one could complain about any of the models having learned the foibles of each of them( different responses to EQ , gain, etc.)

The strength of these amps is that you can dial in your cranked tones, then turn down the output volume to desired levels and keep your tones.

 

Also usb connection to pc to get inside and extensively sculpt presets to load into the 5 available preset slots, and for recording into a DAW with both dry and wet signals simultaneously

Oh, and if you want to, they sound superb through headphones, and you can line in from an ipod etc for backing, listening ( truestereo hi-fi), and to top it all off, they take pedals brilliantly.

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JUke50,

 

By home-use, do you mean to describe a smaller (low wattage) amplifier that is never likely to see service on stage?

There are tons of options available, and you can never go wrong with a name brand like Fender, Marshall, Vox, Orange, or Peavey.

 

Here are my opinions on guitar amps, in no particular order of importance.

 

a. Don't ever order one online that you haven't personally plugged into and played.

Take the time to listen with your own ear what an amp delivers before you put your money down.

 

b. Small, low-watt amplifiers aren't just for home use.

With proper microphone placement and a decent PA system, you can get really great (loud) guitar tones onstage, even with the smaller amps.

My mic of choice for this purpose is a Shure 57.

 

c. An amp is just one small component of your guitar sound.

The players hands and phrasing are the largest pieces of the tone puzzle, followed by the guitar itself, the volume and tone settings on the guitar, the pickups, stomp-box effects, and then finally the amp.

If you don't believe me, just ask any veteran player. Billy Gibbons could pick up a Walmart First Act guitar, plug it into any amp, mixer, or PA in the world, and he would make that guitar sound like, well, Billy Gibbons.

 

d. Take care of your amps.

Keep them clean and dust-free.

Spritz some electrical contact cleaner/lubricant in the pots once a year.

Unplug them from the wall whenever a thunderstorm passes thru the area.

 

e. Never turn down an opportunity to plug into somebody else's amplifier.

It can be beneficial and enlightening to listen to what comes out, and to learn how much of your sound is in your hands, and how much is affected by the brand and model of amp.

 

That's all I have for now.

Happy playing!!

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Tweed Champ clone.

 

Thank you for your response, I have not looked at the Yamaha range of amps, and do tend to favour a tube amp, but will check them out on your recommendation.

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JUke50,

 

By home-use, do you mean to describe a smaller (low wattage) amplifier that is never likely to see service on stage?

There are tons of options available, and you can never go wrong with a name brand like Fender, Marshall, Vox, Orange, or Peavey.

 

Here are my opinions on guitar amps, in no particular order of importance.

 

a. Don't ever order one online that you haven't personally plugged into and played.

Take the time to listen with your own ear what an amp delivers before you put your money down.

 

b. Small, low-watt amplifiers aren't just for home use.

With proper microphone placement and a decent PA system, you can get really great (loud) guitar tones onstage, even with the smaller amps.

My mic of choice for this purpose is a Shure 57.

 

c. An amp is just one small component of your guitar sound.

The players hands and phrasing are the largest pieces of the tone puzzle, followed by the guitar itself, the volume and tone settings on the guitar, the pickups, stomp-box effects, and then finally the amp.

If you don't believe me, just ask any veteran player. Billy Gibbons could pick up a Walmart First Act guitar, plug it into any amp, mixer, or PA in the world, and he would make that guitar sound like, well, Billy Gibbons.

 

d. Take care of your amps.

Keep them clean and dust-free.

Spritz some electrical contact cleaner/lubricant in the pots once a year.

Unplug them from the wall whenever a thunderstorm passes thru the area.

 

e. Never turn down an opportunity to plug into somebody else's amplifier.

It can be beneficial and enlightening to listen to what comes out, and to learn how much of your sound is in your hands, and how much is affected by the brand and model of amp.

 

That's all I have for now.

Happy playing!!

 

The amp is for home use only, I currently use a Blackstar HT1R just wondered if anyone thought I could improve on what I have.

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The amp is for home use only, I currently use a Blackstar HT1R just wondered if anyone thought I could improve on what I have.

 

In my opinion, you have an awesome amp, and I doubt that you would find another amp at a comparable price that would dramatically improve your home playing experience.

 

I played two guitars thru the Blackstar HT1R just last month at a local music store;

a new Telecaster and an old used Les Paul.

 

Both sounded fantastic.

The Blackstar is versatile, easy to use, and has great warmth of tone.

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The ISF feature of the Blackstar will give various voicing from US to UK style, its a great little practice amp. If your after vintage tweed, you can't go wrong with Victoria 518 or 5112 (both 5W). The 5112 is my goto amp

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I picked up a blackstar HT Dual OD Pedal this past winter. (not cheap -- $250)

 

Drop it infront of a good tube amp and kapow!

the ISF control is very touchy, but very effective. the gain and level controls are too.

 

the only thing I hear people rag on is they are all MIC..

but DANG! they sound VERY good.. and the HT Dual is built like a WWII Panzer.

 

I dig it...

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I have two low wattage tube amps.

 

Years back Bob over at MV Amps created a mini-Marshall for me. 14 watts with one EL34 vacuum tube or 8 watts with one EL84. I still have it and use it. Nothing fancy and relatively inexpensive at the time. I think Bob stills makes them but I don't know their current price.

 

My main low wattage tube amp is a 6 to 8 watt Cornford Carrera. One 8 pin and one 9 pin output tube socket. It's output tube is selectable using one tube in a single ended class A design. Tube choices include EL84, EL34, 6L6GC, 6V6, 5881, 6550, KT66, KT77 or KT88 tubes. On board tube reverb and an effects loop. It's not an amp for pure cleans although it does a fine clean tone at low volume. It's more for getting tones like the American Fender Deluxe and more so the British Marshall and Vox tones. I've also found settings that sound very similar to my Mesa Boogie Mark III blue strip head. Fantastic vintage crunch to modern high gain lead tones.

 

arlum

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I am loving my Egnater Rebel 30 combo. You can adjust wattage from 30 down to 1, and it has EL84 and 6V6 tubes that you can play between. amazing settings and pulling it down to 1 watt manages the neighbourhood relationships quite nicely.

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