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Adjust your volume…!


daveinspain

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Been struggling with this one for years… Cruising along holding down a solid rhythm for the band and then my solo comes up, switch to treble pick up for some bite and hit the overdrive pedal for sustain. Ok, that usually goes pretty well even though there seems to be a volume drop while going to the treble pick up. Happens on all my guitars. Kicking in the overdrive usually makes up for that though.

 

Now it's time to go back to the rhythm sound. Hey where'd the guitar go? Have my ears adjusted to the lead sound and going back to the rhythm pick up perception of volume gets lost. Does the audience hear that too?

 

Is an alternative to pedal use and having to stomp on pedals and switching pick ups?

 

Maybe a switching system to go from rhythm sound to lead sound? Clean channel, dirty channel? Clean amp, dirty amp with switching device?

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Yup. I used to use 2 amps but then got fed up with the weight and never having any room.

 

Now I'm down to a 1x12" Fender Super 60 combo...I still don't have any room but I have 3 pedals to deal with the rhythm/lead thing; a Boss eq, an Xotic AC+ with the B channel on clean boost and the A channel on full dirt, and a Visual Sound Route 66 set to grit. I still have to bend down and adjust the gains occasionally but these days I am a big fan of the mid position on my LP for rhythm, and switching to either pup usually gives me the boost I need. I don't do the volume knob thing but always run my guitar volume full up. And I also have a vol pedal.

That covers it.

Re your last sentences - I used to have a Peavey VT Classic 50 with the foot controller and that was perfect for this.

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On switching pickups - you will get the sound of the rhythm pickup out of the treble pickup by picking towards the fretboard. Vice-versa works, but not as well. Try picking near the bridge with the treble pickup for more treble than you will ever want or need. Then just use a simple volume boost or an amp with two separate volume channels (a JCM900, for example). One footswitch, one hand motion, no pickup switching.

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...Now it's time to go back to the rhythm sound. Hey where'd the guitar go? Have my ears adjusted to the lead sound and going back to the rhythm pick up perception of volume gets lost. Does the audience hear that too?

...

 

Hello Dave!

 

That is very interesting phenomenon.

 

My private instructor always begins the lesson with chord recognition game. She plays a triad (Major, minor, augmented, diminished and their inversions), and I have to figure out which type of chord it is. Then, She sometimes plays three minors in a row, and suddenly a Major. I always miss that, for a minor.

 

She explained. Human hearing works like that: it gets used to the overall mood of a musical piece, so it's absolutely not surprising that after a series of minors, I hear a major chord as a minor. She also tricks me with dinamics. A chord's mood can change when played with bigger attack.

 

So, I guess, that is what happening in Your case too.

 

Cheers... Bence

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Yeah Dave. I was at band rehearsal yesterday and noticed the exact same thing you're talking about. IMO, it's just our ears. We hear that boost while playing our lead and then when we switch back, we perceive it as being lower than it was before.

 

Have you ever gotten in and started your car and the radio is super loud? It didn't seem that loud when I parked it. :-k

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Guest Farnsbarns

When I was teen coming in late and putting the TV on I used to put it on stupid low volume for 5 minutes, then up a tiny bit, then it seemed quite loud despite still being quiet.

 

I know that doesn't help, just a yarn.

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May/may not help, but I picked this up off of another forum:

 

 

Haven't presonally tried this with my LP or any other guitar for that matter.

 

He might not have used Overdrive or Distortion pedals, but he certainly had a lot of Delay.

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you'll get used to it Dave.

 

The Les Paul layout actually is pretty well suited for this. (I do this ALL the time)

 

 

The strat layout, is not as easy as there's a master volume with two tone controls.

 

Your fingers and pick attack is definitely a BIG part of dynamic control.

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Rory Gallagher used his guitar volume knob for this all the time. It became just another part of his muscle memory.

 

I use a signal processor, with rhythm & lead volumes adjusted to a couple of stomp buttons. I had to get a new one recently and debuted it at my last gig. I got the volume differential slightly wrong, so have tweaked it a little ready for next time. Only time will tell... :)

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