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Anybody ever hear of these picks?


Guitar God

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I just got home a little while ago from one of my local music stores and some guy brings in a beautiful red 2014 Gibson Firebird in for consignment. The guy lets me try it and hands me a pick and asks, "Have you ever tried a quarter?" and it was a quarter that has been shaped like a pick. He had a few of them and they were really cool. He said it was from a company called Mojo and said they were $20 for 1. He told me the site, but I forgot what it was. Typed in Mojo picks in on Google and the site he told me didn't pop up. He said it was Mojo something. Called the owner and asked if he'd left them with the pouch that has the site in the case, but he took everything out of the case and said he's going to try and call the guy and get the site from him and let me know. But, just wanted to see if anybody o here has heard of them and could tell me the site. Don't know if I could justify paying $20 for 1 quarter pick, but they were cool picks.

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Try Mojo-sonic picks on ebay -

 

http://www.ebay.com/...oin-guitar-pick

 

Think you could make one very easily yourself by the look of them..... [smile]

 

That's them! I didn't see those when I typed in Mojo guitar picks, but my mom just got through showing me what you just posted from eBay. Not bad. The guy said he paid $20 for one.

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I have seen them on the bay. They go for 5 up to 20 US. I love V-picks made in the city when I ate the best ribs at Rendezvous. Memphis. Searcy recommended them and they are rock.

 

The guy said he paid $20 on their site. They were really cool picks. I've never tried V Picks.

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I have one, mine is a 1958 quarter shaped into a pick. I paid $7 on EBay 10 years ago. They are made with quarters dated before 1964 due to the silver content.

 

I don't remember the name of the vendor but I do think it was Mojo Picks since it came with that piece of paper about Stuckey Lemmin.

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I have bought 0ne or two of the Mojo picks several years ago. I cannot remember what I paid. Cool 'novelty' but never stuck with them. I have also bought on Ebay ....the Surfpick. Made by a cool dude, down south in Fla.

 

They are made from a dense species of wood named Lignum Vitae. They are more to my liking (especially on acoustic) than the silver Mojo picks. I notified the maker of the Surf Picks, when I broke one, and he very graciously sent a replacement!

 

Hey, got to try new stuff once in awhile!

 

 

 

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Brian May said he uses a British sixpence. If I recall, he stated that he used them not because of the sound, but because they were cheaper than guitar picks.

 

"May’s renowned use of a metal guitar pick, actually a reshaped sixpence (a small, discontinued British coin),"

 

http://www2.gibson.com/news-lifestyle/features/en-us/myth-busters-brian-may-505.aspx

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My only concern with a metal pick is that metal to metal contact could mean broken strings. Yes?

In fact no worse than any ordinary stiff pick (and you can get thin, flexible metal ones too), however the ones I have do sound much scratchier than plastic/nylon picks. Good for metal! [biggrin]

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Guest Farnsbarns

$20!?!?!?

 

Send me a quarter, or nominate a suitable UK coin and I'll make one I'd under a minute.

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I sold some vintage/antique combs on eBay a few months ago and ended up in a conversation with the buyer. Turns out he calls himself Gary Wagner The Pick Guy, and makes guitar/mandolin picks out of real tortoise shell. He's careful to only use shell that is already been used for other purposes so as not to injure or kill live tortoises for his product.

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"Stuckey Lemon"...Mojo Picks.

 

Back about 2002 my wife bought me a three pack, silver, in my birth year (195X) Gave one to a buddy who was born the same year- one I played a gig with, then drilled a hole in the top and use it as a necklace, the other is stashed to give to one of the grandkids someday.

 

He / they used to have a large selection. Mine is still hanging on a chain around my neck, next to a Sterling Cross. I get lots of compliments and lots of "Hey...is that a quarter on your necklace...?" I like them!

 

Brian

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I thought he used them cause he could buy a bag of them dirt cheap and that is what he loves using. I think Billy from ZZ Top uses a coin as well.

 

Got this off his website-As well as being a great guitarist, Brian May is also noted for his superb guitar tones. His rig is rather unusual and is substantially custom built.

The Red Special

 

Red Special

 

Brian's guitar, the Red Special is unique. He built the guitar himself, with some help from his father, when he was still at school. Incredibly, over 40 years later, this is still Brian's number one guitar and he regularly uses it both on stage and in the studio. One of the unique features of the Red Special is its series wiring for the pickups. Most guitars are wired in parallel, but Brian equipped his guitar with 3 single coil pickups wired in series. Each pickup has a switch to turn it on and off and a phase change switch. This allows a huge variety of sounds as different pickups and different phase combinations are used. The neck of the guitar is mahogany, from an old fire-surround. The centre block and fingerboard are oak and the front and back of the body are a mahogany veneer over blockboard.

 

The construction is semi-solid with large routed areas either side of the centre block of the body. Brian made his guitar from the materials he had available at the time - these included motorbike valve springs (tremolo springs), shelf edging (white binding) and mother of pearl buttons (neck position dots). The pickups were originally home-made but Brian was unhappy with the sound and replaced them with Burns Tri-sonic single coils, which he potted with epoxy resin to prevent them becoming microphonic. Unusually for its time, the guitar features a 24 fret (2 octave) neck and a tremolo system which will 'dive bomb' and come back perfectly in tune. It cost him just £8 to build the guitar and it is now surely one of the most unique and valuable guitars in the world.

 

VOX AC30

 

 

 

Brian's main amps are VOX AC30s. The AC30 is a classic British valve amplifier, which was first used by the likes of The Beatles and The Shadows. It is a class A amplifier, which is noted for its smooth rich tones. Brian uses the 'normal' channel on his AC30s and he has them turned up full, controlling the sound with the volume control on his guitar. With everything turned up full, the AC30s are pushed into natural valve distortion.

 

When playing live, Brian will usually use a stack of 9 AC30s. They are not usually all on at once, but he uses a custom switching unit which will allow him to switch between amps seamlessly, to avoid damaging any of the amps by running them on full power for too long. His configuration generally has the amps grouped for normal, delay 1, delay 2. He often uses a little chorus effect to give the sound a slight sparkle.

 

Brian likes to have his monitors set very loud on stage, so that he gets lots of interaction between the guitar and amps to give the good sustain which is central to his sound and style. His amplifiers are essentially 'stock', although he has them modified for road use to remove the channels he doesn't use and to make them more robust, which has an effect on the tone and increases overall gain slightly.

 

The choice of valves in an AC30 can affect the tone quite substantially and Brian needs to change the valves in his amps regularly because he runs them so hard. Click here for an article on valve selection for the AC30.

 

Click here for an article on the history of the AC30

 

The Deacy Amp

 

deaky amp

 

Brian also uses a small amplifier in the studio, which was built by Queen's bassist, John Deacon. This amp is affectionately known as the Deacy amp. Brian used this amplifier to produce many of the 'guitar orchestrations' which have become part of his trademark sound. This amplifier is often overlooked, but it undoubtedly contributed substantially to many classic Queen tracks. It is a solid state (germanium transistor) combo amp with a small speaker, which John adapted from a hi-fi amp and speaker that he rescued from a skip! VOX sell a commercial copy of this amp, the Vox Brian May Special - See here for more info.

 

Brian uses the Deacy amp with his treble booster, which pushes it into a very smooth-sounding overdrive. To cut down on the treble, Brian will sometimes put a coat over the amp when recording!

 

Sixpence

 

sixpence

 

Brian's rather unusual choice of guitar pick is a coin - an english sixpence, which is a small circular coin with a serrated edge. He chose to use the sixpence as a pick because he finds plastic plectrums too flexible. He holds the coin very lightly and occasionally uses its serrated edge against the strings to produce a rasp. For quiter sections, Brian will often pick the strings with his fingers and only use the coin for the louder sections where more attack is required. For his first solo tour, Brian actually had some sixpence sized coins specially minted and these were on sale during the tour.

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... I think Billy from ZZ Top uses a coin as well.

 

True story - at least he used to. He always joked he could buy a Coke with it after a show (then that it would take two). Now it would take at least 4!

 

Not sure if Billy still uses the quarter - especially with the super light strings he's using. Seems like breakage would be an issue but who knows. He has a very light touch.

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I watched a video of him doing a rig rundown. He loves AC30s.

 

 

Had a laugh watching his tech's distress at not being allowed to set-up 'Ol Black - claims Neil likes it all horrible as it is, and Neil says that his stuffs all outa tune anyway so why bother! [laugh]

How about his collection of- is it Fender Champs? Or some other little amp- I can't recall- he's got like 30 of ' em. All doctored up just the way he likes 'em. Possibly my favourite guitarist of all. I can watch Rust Live over and over, never tire of it. I know to some he sounds like fingernails down a blackboard but to me it's sweet music. I think it's the stress and the way he tortures the music, sort of how I sound accidentally [blink]

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