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Someone asking $2000 for a '68 B-25!


bayoubengal1954

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This is an on the New Orleans CL:

https://neworleans.craigslist.org/msg/5068518107.html

 

I know there is no harm in asking for whatever you want, but there is a '66 for $1300 and a '67 for $1795 on reverb.com (granted those were naturals and not with a sunburst). I've seen some 12 strings going for closer to the $2000 range, but doesn't this seem high for this particular guitar? Is it even worth trying to negotiate with someone (of course after playing it) who starts at this point? The photos are not very good, so it makes it hard to tell the condition and no details are given. The nuts on these are small, I know (1 5/8").

 

Would appreciate any opinions here. Thanks!

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No mystery. Either somebody does not have a clue as to the value or is throwing a Hail Mary Pass hoping some wingnut will jump on it. A few years back I watched a certain guitar go for just about double its normal selling price because two guys got caught up in a bidding war. You can't blame a guy for trying.

 

You should be able to snag a 6 string for under $1K and a 12 string for under $1200. Geez, you can pick up a B45-12 for under $1500 without too much trouble.

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No mystery. Either somebody does not have a clue as to the value or is throwing a Hail Mary Pass hoping some wingnut will jump on it. A few years back I watched a certain guitar go for just about double its normal selling price because two guys got caught up in a bidding war. You can't blame a guy for trying.

 

Thanks, zombywoof. I was hoping you would chime in! I should have made it clear that I have seen people asking for around $2000 for the 12 string. Don't know what the final sales price was (there is one on reverb right and the asking price is $1999...I thought that was crazy as well... [rolleyes] [rolleyes])

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I happen to love these little guys (skinny neck & all), as a good one can sound really sweet.

 

I've often seen them priced at around $1200-$1400 for the 6-string, and $900-$1100 for the 12-string.

 

Then there's the Epi FT-45 Cortez clone, and it's 12-string companion, the FT-85 Serenader. I paid $800 for my '66 Cortez, with the original alligator hardshell case. In the past few years, that's about the lowest price I've seen for one without problems.

 

Condition on these can be absolutely all over the map, especially in the plastic bridge area. Mine has remained structurally sound for the past forty-nine years, while others (I've personally owned) were a mess after little more than ten & needed an overhaul.

 

A belly-up rosewood bridge replaced the plastic one in '67, and a belly-down rosewood bridge debuted in '68. Unfortunately, build quality steadily headed south as you got deeper into the late '60s. However, each piece should still be assessed individually, based on it's own merits - and a good one could always be lurking underneath the historical generalizations.

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True they got heavier and dumber as the 60s came to a close but I owned a '67 with all the 'good' stuff and a '68 that was 'all wrong' and the '68 was clearly the better sounding.

 

The chalkboard and slide rule usually work but sometimes reality comes along and just throws a wrench into the whole works.

 

As to paying that kind of money for a B-25....it's all a matter of personal choice and my opinion is of no value. I personally wouldn't pay much for one.

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You should be able to snag a 6 string for under $1K and a 12 string for under $1200. Geez, you can pick up a B45-12 for under $1500 without too much trouble.

Fwiw several on reverb.com in the $995.00 range. No idea, as usual, with something of that age, how they have been treated and what kind of shape they are in.

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As to paying that kind of money for a B-25....it's all a matter of personal choice and my opinion is of no value. I personally wouldn't pay much for one.

I paid $150 for my first B-25 back around 1978. After playing it for twenty+ years, I let it go & eventually missed that tone a lot. Along came the right Cortez a few years ago, and I just had to have it. Although the price was good, it's cost was a very distant secondary consideration.

 

For some reason, this model is a poster child for spanning the range from crap to brilliant.

 

When you find a good one, grab it!

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I would say for me it always comes down to mentally going over what other guitars I could grab up for the money (or hopefully less). In terms of 1960s guitars I would be more inclined to be checking out something like a Harmony H1203 or Goya/Levin than a Gibson B25.

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Thanks for all your responses! The $2000 asking price is crazy, although it is located in my neck of the woods so I could actually play it. There is this '69 on reverb for $850 but it is in Nevada, a bit of a drive from New Orleans [biggrin]:

https://reverb.com/item/801873-gibson-b25-1969-cherry-sunburst-with-case

If I played this one and loved it, I have a feeling it would be difficult for this person to face reality as to what the guitar is actually worth if the starting price is $2000! Things could get awkward, but it may be worth a short drive to check it out. Like zombywoof stated the seller may find that one person willing to hugely overpay. It won't be me, though. [wink]

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you can get guitars that are so much better, IMO, than a B-25 for a grand or less.

Yes, there are lots of good guitars out there for around $1000, but very few of them that I have any desire to own. If you crave the LG-2/LG-3 sound & feel, a good B-25 for a grand can be a steal, compared to the price most LGs are going for.

 

A couple of months ago I went to look at a 1951 LG-3. My birth year & all that, so there was a built-in level of interest. The guitar was in very good condition, but tonally it couldn't match my little old '66 Epi Cortez (B-25). The LG-3 wasn't a dud. It had a pleasant tone, but it didn't have quite the depth of this particular Cortez for my fingerpicking style.

 

I've played enough of these to have experienced some real clunkers, but the good ones are something special. And finding one of the good ones at a reasonable price can be particularly sweet.

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Yes, there are lots of good guitars out there for around $1000, but very few of them that I have any desire to own. If you crave the LG-2/LG-3 sound & feel, a good B-25 for a grand can be a steal, compared to the price most LGs are going for.

 

A couple of months ago I went to look at a 1951 LG-3. My birth year & all that, so there was a built-in level of interest. The guitar was in very good condition, but tonally it couldn't match my little old '66 Epi Cortez (B-25). The LG-3 wasn't a dud. It had a pleasant tone, but it didn't have quite the depth of this particular Cortez for my fingerpicking style.

 

I've played enough of these to have experienced some real clunkers, but the good ones are something special. And finding one of the good ones at a reasonable price can be particularly sweet.

 

Maybe i haven't played a good one yet, but I've never heard a B-25 that sounded anything like an LG2/LG3. An LG1 would be closer.

 

p

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Maybe i haven't played a good one yet, but I've never heard a B-25 that sounded anything like an LG2/LG3. An LG1 would be closer.

Well, it's a great big world full of guitars out there,

and we've obviously experienced them differently.

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My Brother is giving me a B-25N that he bought brand new. It has spent most of its life under the bed. It is not only beautiful, but even with the original adjustable bridge it has such a sweet tone. I don't think that I would sell HIS for even $2000, due to its sentimental value. Even though his is brand new condition with every piece of original paper, I think it's going to be another ten years before their value reaches those levels. When it does, it will be at least partly due to the oncoming devaluation of the dollar.

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