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guitar_randy

epiphone les pauls- weight relieved body like Gibsons or solid wood?

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I own a couple Gibson Les Pauls and I don't own an Epi Les Paul but I was just wondering if Epiphone Les Pauls have the bodies weight relieved like Gibsons or if they are solid wood or what the deal is in that regards with them?

 

I always hear so much debate and discussions about Gibsons and the weight relieved vs non weight relieved but never came across any discussions regarding the Epiphone brand Les Pausl and if they are weight relieved or not and if so if they use same methods as Gibson.

 

Anyone know at all?

 

 

 

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I own a couple Gibson Les Pauls and I don't own an Epi Les Paul but I was just wondering if Epiphone Les Pauls have the bodies weight relieved like Gibsons or if they are solid wood or what the deal is in that regards with them?

 

I always hear so much debate and discussions about Gibsons and the weight relieved vs non weight relieved but never came across any discussions regarding the Epiphone brand Les Pausl and if they are weight relieved or not and if so if they use same methods as Gibson.

 

Anyone know at all?

This is a good question, guitar-randy. I've often thought about this as well. Weight is a significant issue for me.

I've not seen or heard any info on weight relief in solid-body Epiphones.

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Epiphone Les Paul's are not weight relieved. The wood used isn't mahogany and seems lighter than most real mahogany so the Epi's don't need weight relief. That said, an Epi Les Paul still won't be a lightweight guitar - probably equivalent to some weight relieved Gibson Les Paul's.

 

If you want lightweight why not consider a (chambered) hollowbody ES style Les Paul?

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Epiphone Les Paul's are not weight relieved. The wood used isn't mahogany and seems lighter than most real mahogany so the Epi's don't need weight relief. That said, an Epi Les Paul still won't be a lightweight guitar - probably equivalent to some weight relieved Gibson Les Paul's.

 

If you want lightweight why not consider a (chambered) hollowbody ES style Les Paul?

Epiphone quote all the Les Paul range as having Mahogany bodies?

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Epiphone Les Paul's are not weight relieved. The wood used isn't mahogany and seems lighter than most real mahogany so the Epi's don't need weight relief. That said, an Epi Les Paul still won't be a lightweight guitar - probably equivalent to some weight relieved Gibson Les Paul's.

 

If you want lightweight why not consider a (chambered) hollowbody ES style Les Paul?

 

Not looking for one,just curious about that aspect of them

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The Epiphone Florentine is just such a ES style LP. I tried one of these at Andertons when I bought my ES-339 this year. Had the ES-339 disapointed me I would have brought the Florentine home. It was sweet. The only weight is from the center block on which the pups are mounted.

 

epiphone-eclub-2014-les-paul-standard-florentine-pro-vintage-sunburst-burst_2_.jpg

 

 

http://www.epiphone.com/Products/Les-Paul/Ltd-Ed-Les-Paul-Standard-Florentine-PRO.aspx

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Epiphone quote all the Les Paul range as having Mahogany bodies?

 

What they quote and what's real are two different things.

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What they quote and what's real are two different things.

 

What makes you think it's not mahogany? Because the guitars feel lighter then they should? Would be interested to hear your opinion.

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What makes you think it's not mahogany? Because the guitars feel lighter then they should? Would be interested to hear your opinion.

Epiphone generally uses a wood called Lauan (Philippine mahogany, meranti, red meranti, white meranti) . Lauan is widely sold around the world as "Philippine mahogany", including its use for plywood face veneers. It is one of the world's most popular timbers.

 

Still, better than plywood I'd say! :)

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Epiphone generally uses a wood called Lauan (Philippine mahogany, meranti, red meranti, white meranti) . Lauan is widely sold around the world as "Philippine mahogany", including its use for plywood face veneers. It is one of the world's most popular timbers.

 

Still, better than plywood I'd say! :)

 

Ive just checked another forum (2011) that says pretty much the same thing.

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Epiphone Les Paul Ultras are weight-relieved. Heavily chambered, in fact ---- like so:

 

300px-LpUltraChamber.jpg

Interesting, good pic of the chambered Paul body.

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What makes you think it's not mahogany? Because the guitars feel lighter then they should? Would be interested to hear your opinion.

 

Answer as per Campbell's post.

 

This doesn't mean that Epiphone's are "no good" or anything like that. I've got a couple of Epiphone's and they are great guitars. However, the wood is certainly not proper mahogany.

 

Even Gibson no longer uses the best mahogany which is widely regarded as Honduras mahogany. I am not sure when Gibson stopped using it but it has been some years. Whether Honduras is still used for the very high end Collectors Choice or Reissue models I don't know.

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