Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Stopbar height ?


Steve112

Recommended Posts

Hey all, I would like to confirm the often given wisdom that raising the stopbar will enable easier bending.

First stopbar equipped guitar in many years (Epi ES 339), 10 gauge strings, and it does seem that full bends incorporating vibrato feel a little stiff relative to my longer scale Strat which also has 10s.

So, is the raising of the stopbar height/break angle lessening advice real or not so much?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've never noticed a difference when I've changed the height, but you give it a try.. what would be the harm? it's two screws? :)

 

I've always felt less tension on my gibby's than my strats and tele..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've never noticed a difference when I've changed the height, but you give it a try.. what would be the harm? it's two screws? :)

 

I've always felt less tension on my gibby's than my strats and tele..

Thanks LPS1976, rct and brad1 for the TRIPLE BUNK!!! I'll go with that. [biggrin]

I actually used up brain time thinking about this, never could conceptualize how that might work, or NOT! I think now, that I'm feeling a difference due to playing Strats with the sprung floating bridge for years. I'm thinking the bending is moderated by the springs in the Strat's floating bridge assembly, and it's THIS vs the lack of, that makes the 339 seem stiffer.

 

And thanks for the support kidblast but I don't want to (without very good reason) mess in any way with the current, excellent setup on my 339. It plays better than many higher end guitars I've played over the years.

MORE KNOWLEDGE....LESS BUNK.. [thumbup]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a 1966 Limited Edition G-400 Pro and an ES-339 Pro. When both stopbars are at their lowest, my 339's strings are a tad more difficult to bend (both strung with 10-46s).

 

When I change the strings on my ES-339, I lower the stopbar all the way when I remove the old strings. I put the new strings on, slightly tighten them, and then raise both screws on the stopbar a quarter turn each. I then tune to pitch and stretch multiple times and find that my ES-339s strings are as easy to bend as my G400.

 

It's minimal, but I can feel a difference for sure.

 

Just my .02.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have done the same thing as mfowler to my ES 339 PRO and came to the same conclusion as his.

 

There was definitely a difference. I know this because I was having difficulty with my right wrist when I was doing a lot of recording with my 339. After I raised the stopbar by half a turn from the initial position that was bottomed, I found it much easier to pick and the strings didn't feel so stiff thereby alleviating the pain somewhat.

 

I'm more interested in reading about real world experiences, either it makes a difference or not. 'Bunkum', or it's equivalent, was levelled at Galileo back in the day and not much theory or observation was put forward to back up that view.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The tension of the strings is a function of

 

(the distance between the nut and the bridge, which we call scale length)

 

and

 

(the thickness of the string, which we call gauge)

 

To get the string to ring as a note you need it to stop vibrating at each end and have a vibrating middle. The tension and thickness of the string will determine that note. If you want a lower note, you lessen the tension, higher you raise it. The tension it takes to vibrate at a chosen note doesn't change, because you haven't changed the scale length or the gauge of string.

 

The string, the frets, none of the parts of the guitar know what you did past the nut or past the bridge, it still functions exactly the same.

 

In the 70's we put our Mrlbl up there at the pointy end. Don't be like us.

 

Now, as nicely as I can, GET OFF MY LAWN.

 

rct

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've never noticed a difference when I've changed the height, but you give it a try.. what would be the harm? it's two screws? :)

 

I've always felt less tension on my gibby's than my strats and tele..

Hi kidblast, I think the tension differences you feel between Fenders and Gibsons is down to scale length. The 23.75" Gibson scale is shorter by 0.75" and therefore has less tension.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some interesting stuff about this on the Frudua site. Just Google Frudua guitars. He deals specifically with Strats but there is an excellent section dealing with string tension and break angles.

And I must say that from my experience there is a detectable change in "feel" (tension) as the stopbar is adjusted on Gibson-type guitars irrespective of scale length. I'm currently playing an Epiphone 339 Pro and a 335 Pro and have messed about with the stop bars on them to get the feel right for me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi kidblast, I think the tension differences you feel between Fenders and Gibsons is down to scale length. The 23.75" Gibson scale is shorter by 0.75" and therefore has less tension.

 

oh that is absolutely the reason and why I mentioned it..

 

now hear me and despair..

 

the "Tone Lords" will tell ya,, the single most important part of this whole mysterious and illusive topic, is that the string MUST NEVER touch the bridge behind the saddle... or heaven forbid,, you loose glorious sustain, and for you,, the sun shall never shine....

 

right, have you ever TRIED to make that setup work with a guitar that is properly intontated?

 

 

give it a shot.. good luck wit dat..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the "Tone Lords" will tell ya,, the single most important part of this whole mysterious and illusive topic, is that the string MUST NEVER touch the bridge behind the saddle...

 

Which is why I'm so good at pissing off the Tone Lords, my guitars are living proof of all the bs that guitars have become. 44 years now.

 

rct

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Which is why I'm so good at pissing off the Tone Lords, my guitars are living proof of all the bs that guitars have become. 44 years now.

 

rct

 

I hear ya.. I've rebuked many myths.. used to be naive.. been at it 50 years now. there's not a lot of mystique left for us is there?

 

it is..

 

what it is...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Which is why I'm so good at pissing off the Tone Lords, my guitars are living proof of all the bs that guitars have become. 44 years now.

 

rct

 

 

I hear ya.. I've rebuked many myths.. used to be naive.. been at it 50 years now. there's not a lot of mystique left for us is there?

 

it is..

 

what it is...

Not to seem a little dense here but I've been a player since 1959. I simply haven't owned a Gibson style stopbar equipped axe in decades. Back then I just never thought of a stopbar as being something to change if the guitar played well. If it intonated, had good action and stayed in tune, I was happy as a clam! And the Gibsons I owned (ES335, ES330, SG Special) did just that. [biggrin]

There was no internet information overload with all the conflicting BS of today.

I'm coming off 35 years of Strats as my main instruments so my entire feel of the ES339 is totally different. One of the biggest being the Strat's slim "C" contour neck vs the "SlimTaper" "D" contour of the Epi. The other is a recent change to 10s after using 9s for 40 yrs.

Anyway, great info and advice gentlemen, I thank you! [thumbup]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

always good to investigate and experiment

 

I was sort of interested after reading quite a bit about the history of the les paul, and then following on with a lot of the details on proper setups and how to adjust various things to get "the most" out of what the guitar had to offer.

 

some of the suggestions did make a difference, where others, I wasn't able to decide one way or another if it made a diff.

 

but it didn't mean I didn't try it anyway! [thumbup]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...