Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Hecubs Scram (Written in memory of a friend)


vikingtone

Recommended Posts

A friend of mine laid low by financial circumstances and a storm of further troubles eventually gave up I have thought about this a lot with great sadness but also fondness of the loving caring friend I remember and in that friendship sense is still here in my thoughts even though he has died through his own suicide. Another schoolfriend I had not kept in regular touch with also took his own life in quite different circumstances and for different reasons certainly leading up to the relationship break up that drove my school friend to take his own life. But for the grace of god or what other inner stregnth bears us through lifes trials we are all in a position or have the possibility of choosing course of action that can do more harm than good in our desperation the most extreme certainly final chocie being to end it all as My friend chose to do, I wish with all my heart he had not but I do feel and understand his pain and wish he had not eventually submitted to a conclusion of hopelessness.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Viking I can feel the passion and desperateness. I didn't get the words (perhaps statins induced tinitus). Love the progression for this solemn meaning. Can you print the words here?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Viking I can feel the passion and desperateness. I didn't get the words (perhaps statins induced tinitus). Love the progression for this solemn meaning. Can you print the words here?

 

Hi Tman, I posted a much more personal explanation of the circumstances on FSGC really as i did not want to intrude on my friends families private grief. Its a 2 51 progression for the verses in the key of Gminor. 2. Am7b5/g 5. Dm/c 1. G6 5. Am7 b5 /c The choruses are 1 4 5 Gm Cm7 Dm7 Verses in 2/2 and Choruses 4/4 time.

 

The Choruses are drawn from Shakespeares Rape of Lucrece and Ovids Metamorphoses both of which deal with themes of loss and exile but also avarice and the motivation of jealousy and greed in enemies who seek to do damage not from a need to have enough but from a wish that others should be denied what they themselves merely covet. These themes have endured for thousands of years.

 

Hecuba's Scream ( song for a friend )

 

 

When all your fears come true

 

No hope to start anew

 

Broken from the fall

 

driven to end it all

 

 

happy times that passed

 

memories of the past

 

whats lost can not remain

 

all now felt is pain

 

 

broken.. dulled your eyes

 

no longer singing through skies

 

optomistic sun of may

 

all that dominates dismay

 

But, the poorly rich,

so wanteth in his store,

That, cloy'd with much,

he pineth still for more. # 1

 

 

Sadness regards the mire

 

the jealous only aspire

 

a tear from my eye

 

there but for grace go I

 

the matron mourns, forlorn and forsaken, # 2

 

Hecuba: Screams

But late on the pinnacle of fame,

strong in my many sons.

Hecuba: Screams

now exiled, penniless

 

 

Lucrecia defiled , lies dead

persecutors were exiled,

the poorly rich

changed from kings to consuls.

But, the poorly rich,

so wanteth in his store,

That, cloy'd with much,

he pineth still for more.

 

Original MUsic and Words R G Lewis 2015

 

Choruses

 

#1. For that he colour'd with his high estate,

Hiding base sin in plaits of majesty;

That nothing in him seem'd inordinate,

Save sometime too much wonder of his eye,

Which, having all, all could not satisfy;

But, poorly rich, so wanteth in his store,

That, cloy'd with much, he pineth still for more.

 

 

THE RAPE OF LUCRECE William Shalespeare.

 

THE ARGUMENT.

LUCIUS TARQUINIUS (for his excessive pride surnamed Superbus), after he had caused his own father-in-law, Servius Tullius, to be cruelly murdered, and, contrary to the Roman laws and customs, not requiring or staying for the people's suffrages, had possessed himself of the kingdom, went, accompanied with his sons and other noblemen of Rome, to besiege Ardea. During which siege the principal men of the army meeting one evening at the tent of Sextus Tarquinius, the king's son, in their discourses after supper, every one commended the virtues of his own wife; among whom Collatinus extolled the incomparable chastity of his wife Lucretia. In that pleasant humour they all posted to Rome; and intending, by their secret and sudden arrival, to make trial of that which every one had before avouched, only Collatinus finds his wife, though it were late in the night, spinning amongst her maids: the other ladies were all found dancing and revelling, or in several disports. Whereupon the noblemen yielded Collatinus the victory, and his wife the fame. At that time Sextus Tarquinius being inflamed with Lucrece's beauty, yet smothering his passions for the present, departed with the rest back to the camp; from whence he shortly after privily withdrew himself, and was (according to his estate) royally entertained and lodged by Lucrece at Collatium. The same night he treacherously stealeth into her chamber, violently ravished her, and early in the morning speedeth away. Lucrece, in this lamentable plight, hastily dispatched messengers, one to Rome for her father, another to the camp for Collatine. They came, the one accompanied with Junius Brutus, the other with Publius Valerius; and finding Lucrece attired in mourning habit, demanded the cause of her sorrow. She, first taking an oath of them for her revenge, revealed the actor, and whole manner of his dealing, and withal suddenly stabbed herself. Which done, with one consent they all vowed to root out the whole hated family of the Tarquins; and bearing the dead body to Rome, Brutus acquainted the people with the doer and manner of the vile deed, with a bitter invective against the tyranny of the king; wherewith the people were so moved, that with one consent and a general acclamation the Tarquins were all exiled, and the state government changed from kings to consuls.

 

 

 

#2 But late on the pinnacle of fame, strong in my many sons. now exiled, penniless."

 

[Ovid, Metamorphoses. Xiii

 

And when fortune overturned the pride

of the Trojans, who dared everything, so that

both the king and his kingdom were destroyed,

Poor wretched captured Hecuba,

after she saw her Polyxena dead

and found her Polydorus on the beach,

was driven mad by sorrow

and began barking like a dog...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...