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Hi all, I'm in a ambient mood at the moment and am experimenting with delay and reverb soundscapes. I want to invest in a volume pedal for volume swells. I've done some research to the point where I feel I've overloaded the grey matter (believe me, it doesn't take much :lol: )

I've been looking at all the pedals available by Ernie Ball, Jim Dunlop, Morley, BOSS. I just can't decide which one would be, well 'the one'. Do I go for 'passive' or 'pots'

Anyone with experience of owning one of these pedals and suggestions would be gratefully appreciated. My budget is a maximum of £100/$150

 

kind regards, Emma :)

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I have a Dunlop High Gain GCB-80 Volume pedal. It works fine for me. I bought it used on the bay and it cause I was working on learning Rush - La Villa Stangiato. The volume pedal part is still kickin my arse.

 

Hi FZ Fan, thank you for your reply. :) This is the Dunlop that caught my eye last night on the net, very tempted. Do you know what the 'High Gain' stands for?, I'm a bit confused by that.

 

kind regards, Emma :)

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The classic pedal for this (back in the day) was the "Goodrich". It was used by many of the pedal steel and organ players. The Ernie Ball pedal is basically the same design, if not a "reissue" of the Goodrich. I own two of the EB's (one for an electronic organ, and one for guitar use when needed).

 

As a simple potentiometer operated by a string attached to the pedal, the design is virtually infallible and bullet proof. It's design and operation also gives you a little resistance in pedal travel operation which the electronic and optical pedals don't give you.

 

I went to the Goodrich/EB pedal after many years of using an original style Morley optical pedal. Never looked back.

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The Ernie Ball is the current standard. If you want to get a volume pedal that works great and be done with it, just get the Ernie Ball.

 

A typical volume pedal is a passive device. It uses a potentiometer (pot) to vary the amount of your guitar signal which is dumped off to ground.

 

This means that there is a small amount of signal loss even when the volume pedal is in the loudest (toe down) position

 

There are some active volume pedals, which include a buffer or gain stage to make up for this signal loss.

 

Most people just use the passive Ernie Ball pedal and maybe make a slight adjustment to the amp to bring it back to the original sound or maybe they don't even notice a difference

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Thank you FZ Fan, L5Larry and Dub-T-123, for your suggeations and experience with volume pedals. I've pulled the trigger and ordered a Ernie Ball VP Junior (YAY). It was a close call with this and the Jim Dunlop High Gain Volume.

 

kind regards, Emma :)

 

 

 

Good choice! I've used the same Ernie Ball VP Jr pedal for years, and have zero complaints [thumbup]

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The Ernie Ball volume pedals have been the standard for a long time. Their weakness is the string - though they sell spares. I used one for a long time and it worked well.

 

Recently I bought this big honking Dunlop one. I like the foot feel better than the EB and so far it's proved durable. Time will tell.

 

VolumePedal-11.jpg.png

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The Ernie Ball volume pedals have been the standard for a long time. Their weakness is the string - though they sell spares. I used one for a long time and it worked well.

 

Recently I bought this big honking Dunlop one. I like the foot feel better than the EB and so far it's proved durable. Time will tell.

 

VolumePedal-11.jpg.png

Hi surfpup, wow! that is one impressive pedal [thumbup]. It looks very sturdy. Hope you get many playing years from it. :)

 

kind regards, Emma :)

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I go Boss FV50H and 500H all the way. H = High impedance, so at front of fx chain.

Great pedals, durable, good travel.

Crucial for me - it IS my volume control.

Hi jdgm, that's great you get what you want from your pedals. [thumbup] All pedals are new to me, never used to use them. I got back into playing the guitar last year after a 10 year break. Technology has come along in leaps and bounds and I'm having lots of fun discovering and experimenting with pedals. It's given me a new lease of life :)

 

kind regards, Emma :)

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My guess is that any of the decent brands should work well enough. Ages ago I even used one from a friend who had one for a relatively inexpensive keyboard and it worked well enough if you didn't stomp on it as if it were a stone.

 

Frankly I think that overall it's one of the best possible pedal purchases. It can operate swells, yes, but also attack and decay. In a live gig it can dump volume but keep the guitar active if you're taking a break, swapping instruments or just taking a vocal priority without worry of feedback or whatever.

 

OTOH, since all my picking the past few years has been directed more to AE guitars or an archtop for a solo gig, my pedals get very, very little action... My volume pedal, Leslie and B3 emulators are somewhere under a desk in my "cave" at home... Don't even recall the brand. I think pedals are best used in ensembles... with care taken to why they're used for a given piece of the group sound.

 

m

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My guess is that any of the decent brands should work well enough. Ages ago I even used one from a friend who had one for a relatively inexpensive keyboard and it worked well enough if you didn't stomp on it as if it were a stone.

 

Frankly I think that overall it's one of the best possible pedal purchases. It can operate swells, yes, but also attack and decay. In a live gig it can dump volume but keep the guitar active if you're taking a break, swapping instruments or just taking a vocal priority without worry of feedback or whatever.

 

OTOH, since all my picking the past few years has been directed more to AE guitars or an archtop for a solo gig, my pedals get very, very little action... My volume pedal, Leslie and B3 emulators are somewhere under a desk in my "cave" at home... Don't even recall the brand. I think pedals are best used in ensembles... with care taken to why they're used for a given piece of the group sound.

 

m

Hi milod, thank you for your reply. It's great to have you back on the forum [thumbup]

 

Concerning the use of pedals, I agree with you. They can add a whole new dimension to a song if applied in the right context.

Lately I've been playing ambient guitar, I like the use of reverb and delay, creates a sense of space amongst the notes. I find it very relaxing and it's given my playing a new 'twist'

 

kind regards, Emma :)

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