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Walked Out of Johnny Lang Concert Tonight


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That sucks. I bring earplugs to all shows, whether it's a bar, club, or arena. Even when it isn't quite painfully loud, I hear and enjoy the music much more.

 

I do the same thing.

 

Ever since Loverboy and Quiet Riot back in 1983. They screwed up my hearing for a few days. I swore if I ever got the ringing out of my ears, I won't take my hearing for granted again.

 

In a lil pouch I have a set of sonic II's and some foamies, I bring to every and all shows.

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I saw Journey two years ago and we walked out. It was painfully loud. I saw Orson at a small club and it made my son ill. There was so much bass it gave him palpitations. Yet I saw Bonnie Raitt, Peter Frampton and Joe Satriani during the same time period and they were great.

 

OK so I'm not the only one. I just went to that big Foo Fighters 20th Anniversary show at RFK Stadium, and LL Cool J was on the bill. I didn't leave the stadium, but I made an excuse to go to the bathroom during his performance because the bass was so powerful it felt like my heart beat was being affected. [unsure]

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Well from all the posts on this thread I can see that I'm far from alone with this problem. The thing is you get used to your respective local venues and one would think you know what to expect at most places and learn to avoid certain clubs where the bands are always too loud & so forth. Hoyt Sherman Place here in Des Moines is a historical venue where there is not a bad seat in the house. It's just never been necessary to crank it in that venue because the acoustics are so good. It's just a shame because I missed over an hour of what I paid for.

 

I would have thought the community organization that runs this place & whom have raised a great deal of money over many years to restore this venue to it's present day grandeur would have been concerned with structural damage to the place with the volume levels we heard last night. I'm guessing we were lucky not to have a large section of the beautifully ornate ceiling not fall on us and kill us. It truly was that stupidly loud. Here's their website for anyone who is interested in reading up on the history of this place. http://www.hoytsherman.org/

 

And here's a photo of the auditorium we were in:

 

VN1B0889.jpg

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Well from all the posts on this thread I can see that I'm far from alone with this problem. The thing is you get used to your respective local venues and one would think you know what to expect at most places and learn to avoid certain clubs where the bands are always too loud & so forth. Hoyt Sherman Place here in Des Moines is a historical venue where there is not a bad seat in the house. It's just never been necessary to crank it in that venue because the acoustics are so good. It's just a shame because I missed over an hour of what I paid for.

 

I would have thought the community organization that runs this place & whom have raised a great deal of money over many years to restore this venue to it's present day grandeur would have been concerned with structural damage to the place with the volume levels we heard last night. I'm guessing we were lucky not to have a large section of the beautifully ornate ceiling not fall on us and kill us. It truly was that stupidly loud. Here's their website for anyone who is interested in reading up on the history of this place. http://www.hoytsherman.org/

 

And here's a photo of the auditorium we were in:

 

VN1B0889.jpg

 

Gorgeous Auditorium! [thumbup] No, your're not alone...Sorry, they were too loud, to enjoy. I (too) don't

mind "reasonable" loud, IF it truly enhances the music, and the experience! But, when it's so over the top,

that it's really just Noise...I leave, also! Doesn't matter if it's a large venue, or a small club. Ear plugs

don't help, when the bass beats, unmercifully, against your chest, and makes it hard to breathe!

 

CB

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This is why I bring a set of V-Moda faders with me to every live show I attend. They're ear plugs which are specifically tuned for listening to live music:

 

http://v-moda.com/faders-vip

 

I'm 21 and I attend a lot of live shows for all different kinds of music. I value my hearing and I would rather not go deaf before I'm 30.

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Well from all the posts on this thread I can see that I'm far from alone with this problem. The thing is you get used to your respective local venues and one would think you know what to expect at most places and learn to avoid certain clubs where the bands are always too loud & so forth. Hoyt Sherman Place here in Des Moines is a historical venue where there is not a bad seat in the house. It's just never been necessary to crank it in that venue because the acoustics are so good. It's just a shame because I missed over an hour of what I paid for.

 

I would have thought the community organization that runs this place & whom have raised a great deal of money over many years to restore this venue to it's present day grandeur would have been concerned with structural damage to the place with the volume levels we heard last night. I'm guessing we were lucky not to have a large section of the beautifully ornate ceiling not fall on us and kill us. It truly was that stupidly loud. Here's their website for anyone who is interested in reading up on the history of this place. http://www.hoytsherman.org/

 

And here's a photo of the auditorium we were in:

 

VN1B0889.jpg

Birmingham_symfonie_hall_zpsgwrqapnt.jpgI think we here in Birmingham in our Symphony Hall, we have one of the best halls in the world. I've never heard a bad sound there as I think they have a sound limit. It never fails to amaze me when I go there.

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IMO this is one of the most important threads on the forum at present... [thumbup]

 

I saw a very young Gary Moore with Skid Row in the early 70's...the noise was atrocious and a distorted mush.... [thumbdn]

 

It all comes down to the art/science/quality of amplification

 

And yes, the sound on stage can be at odds with the sound at the middle to back of the hall

 

Large venues (with high ticket prices :blink: ) will have well tuned house PA's for the use of visiting mega-stars

 

Unsurprisingly the recent 'Out There' tour of Paul McCartney had IMO the best possible sound quality....handling the dynamic from 'Blackbird' to 'Helter Skelter' with aplomb and no ringing ears after a 2.5hr concert.... [thumbup]

 

V

 

:-({|=

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1440483507[/url]' post='1688112']

This is why I bring a set of V-Moda faders with me to every live show I attend. They're ear plugs which are specifically tuned for listening to live music:

 

http://v-moda.com/faders-vip

 

I'm 21 and I attend a lot of live shows for all different kinds of music. I value my hearing and I would rather not go deaf before I'm 30.

Those look like very nice ear plugs. I looked them up and it said they reduce noise levels by 12 db. I worked at the railroad and we had tons of advise, classes we had to take about hearing loss. Of course the railroad is an extremely loud noise envirement and I retired there from hearing loss as well as everyone else there. Normal conversation generates 60 db. A normal lawn mower generates 90 db. Traffic noise is around 80db. The occupational safety and health administration suggests that anything 85db or over, will cause hearing loss over time. Therefore they recommend wearing earplugs tucked back in both ears and ear muffs tight against the head while mowing, to prevent hearing loss. If a mower causes, 90 db and you wear those vader ear plugs, you reduced the mower to 78 db. Your below the 85 db range. Loud concerts can cause 95 db or more. Whenever you get into 100 db levels of sound, it's not good people. The louder the sound, the shorter the time for hearing loss. They can never bring back your hearing loss. Of course I worked in a shot blast area that produced 120db every day and wore their best ear plugs on the market as well as modified ear muffs over top, and an air hood as well and still ended up with hearing loss. I got a settlement and hearing aids before I left there. If you ever shot a big caliber gun inside a building like a indoor range with no protection, it's a quick very loud sound and your ears will ring for days. My son thought he could shoot my Smith and Wesson .500 outside once without ear muffs, and later told me his ears rang for over a week. He described the pain as holding a live grenade in his hand as it went off. He could not sleep as the ringing kept him Awake. Welcome to hearing loss!

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  • 4 weeks later...

Evol!,

 

I just heard from Simone Pace, he's out on tour and they're probably happily deafening everyone within a mile.

 

He's too funny, he still has the 1974 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport that I sold him 20 years ago. I gave him my phone number so sooner or later I'll find myself playing host to Blonde Redhead as they tour the east coast.

 

Last I saw his twin brother still plays that old cherry Les Paul double cutaway Junior.

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