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Gibson Les Paul Junior Collectable?


RyanGT90

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So im new to the forum so sorry if im posting in the wrong section. I bought a Gibson Les Paul Junior 2015 a few months back and despite saying that i didnt mind the tuning system, zero fret, hologram and the ugly signature on the headstock, at the time of purchase, theyre starting to irritate me now. So i had the idea of stripping it all. Removing the zero fret nut, removing the signature and hologram by digging into the nitro, installing normal tuners and maybe a bridge that doesnt look like a toy. Im happy to do this even if it means never being able to sell the guitar but the only thing thats stopping me is that ive been told these 2015 models might become collectable so an increase in price? You guys have any input on this or should i to ahead and tear my junior to shreds. Thanks in advance :)

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Sell it.

 

Admit you bought something that seemed like a good idea at the time, but turned out to be something else.

 

If you strip off all the objectionable bits, you will reduce the guitar to 1/4th it's original value.

 

Unless you play guitar like Jaco Pastorius played bass, and your stripped-down Junior becomes worth more than The Bass Of Doom some day.

But that is not very likely.

Unless you play guitar like....

 

Ah, I'm going to leave it at that.

Sell it.

Or play it, and make great music on it.

If it stays in tune, plays great, and sounds good, then it's a keeper.

That is my standard advice.

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I feel you! I have a 3 Les Pauls one of which is a 2015 Gibson Les Paul Classic. I love mine the way it is. I wasn't mad about the Les Paul 100 logo like most people one reason was that I knew they would only do the 100 logo for 2015 model year. The tuner is handy for my live situations. I play just 1 guitar the entire night (My 2015). Don't get me wrong I've had a couple of issues with the tuner but it was a faulty servo motor that would only tune manually. I e-mailed Gibson and they sent replacements for free. The Nut had grooves wear into it and It was also replaced by Gibson at no cost. The Coil splits and boost toggle on my 2015 give me more great sounds out of this 1 guitar tahn most of the guitars I've owned combined. As for resale/collectible value, That's kind of a double edged sword. They've switched back to the original specs on the 2016 line including putting the nibs back onto the frets which they stoped doing in 2013 (I think). In 20 years will the 2015 be worth alot because they were only 1 year production or they could be worth a lot less because they are rare because people did not by them, like them, or want them. I knw people whod did buy the 2014 and 2015 with the min e tune/ G-force switched them out a soon as the bought them so there will defanitly be very few 2015 models in original condition. One last thing , the wider neck on the 2015 (Which I expected more people to be yelling about) Is somtehing I like. The wider neck suits my style of playing. But I heard more complaints over the 100 logo and tuner than the neck. Either way! I'll be keeping mine as it came from Gibson because I like it and it works for me. Down the road I hope they will still have replacement parts the G-Force tuners and lots of extra Zero Fret Nuts. I'm sure the few of us that keep them stock will need them and I hope they don't cost an arm and a leg.

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... installing ... a bridge that doesnt look like a toy. ...

In case she plays and sounds to your desire, I would do just that. A fully adjustable bridge would be a major upgrade - like this one:

 

babygrandchrome.jpg

 

http://store.hipshotproducts.com/cart.php?m=product_detail&p=193

 

In case you don't like your Junior, I would leave it all stock and sell it.

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You can either do exactly as you mention - in which case it will have a very low re-sale value - or you could sell it now whilst it's still worth some money which you can put towards the purchase of a model you prefer. If I were in your position I'd do the latter.

 

.....the only thing thats stopping me is that ive been told these 2015 models might become collectable.....

Without wishing to appear unkind that's just about the least likely scenario I've read in ages.

 

All signs seem to indicate that the 2015 range has been a complete disaster. Almost no-one wants to buy them now and that's unlikely to change at some point in the future.

The 2015 batch might turn out to be rarer than LPs released from previous and successive years but they are unlikely to become sought-after (IMO, of course).

Have a look at the changes expected for the 2016 range and you'll notice almost all the 'innovations' have been ditched.

 

Still; this is just my opinion. Others might disagree.

 

Pip.

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So im new to the forum so sorry if im posting in the wrong section. I bought a Gibson Les Paul Junior 2015 a few months back and despite saying that i didnt mind the tuning system, zero fret, hologram and the ugly signature on the headstock, at the time of purchase, theyre starting to irritate me now. So i had the idea of stripping it all. Removing the zero fret nut, removing the signature and hologram by digging into the nitro, installing normal tuners and maybe a bridge that doesnt look like a toy. Im happy to do this even if it means never being able to sell the guitar but the only thing thats stopping me is that ive been told these 2015 models might become collectable so an increase in price? You guys have any input on this or should i to ahead and tear my junior to shreds. Thanks in advance :)

 

Hi Ryan-

 

Welcome! I feel your pain, man! I did EXACTLY the same thing- bought one and never "cottoned" to the (*ahem*) improvements. I did try to make it better for me; took off the GForce tuners and installed some Grovers. Problem was; there wasn't enough "down pressure" over the nut. Frustrated, I contacted Gibson. they sent me out a "prototype" nut, a chrome plated one that the groves were cut differently on. That worked. STILL...I wasn't happy.

 

I traded it with another guitar for my LP Studio. I am VERY happy now and learned a valuable lesson; Guitars are like relationships. If you "go into" one thinking "This ain't perfect, but if I change this and do that...then..." UH_UH! NEVER woiks!

 

If you do the "mods" you're suggesting you'll have a hacked up 2015 model that will be worth next to nothing. Don't forget- those things you intend to do will cost time and money to do correctly. Good money after bad...

 

In time...probably a LONG time, it may be worth something to a collector. Maybe. I had a Gibson Maurader I bought in 1979. If I'd have held on to it all these years it may have appreciated by $200.00 IF I could find someone interested. Maybe a bad analogy but you get what I'm saying.

 

Best wishes- let us know what you decide /how you make out!

 

Brian

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There's a difference between "collectable" and "valuable".

 

I can see a situation in the near future, where some will want, or "collect" these 2015's because of the wider neck. While most players don't see the wisdom in it, and the string spacing might be off, there ARE iconic acoustics (like the OM) that have necks close to this width, and many seek them out BECAUSE of that.

 

Also, I can see some of the features becoming "collectable". While most do not prefer or want the G-force, I am willing to bet there will be enough of those who LIKE it to want to grab one when they can, especially if Gibson gets away from it to "satisfy the masses". Already kinda happening.

 

But will that increase the "value"? Unlikely.

 

If you wanna keep it stock and make money, you could try putting it under the bed for 20 years. But if you want to LOOSE money right now, you could do all the things you list.

 

By the time you were to do all these things to it, you could buy another guitar. If you MOSTLY like the guitar, you could change a few things to make it suit you.

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Guest Farnsbarns

I didn't notice anyone suggesting that Beanie Babies were guitars, rct............................:huh:

 

Pip.

 

Ha! P1ssed myself. Don't do that.

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I didn't notice anyone suggesting that Beanie Babies were guitars, rct............................:huh:

 

Pip.

I'm with you, Pip.

 

To my understanding RCT wanted to say that Beanie Babies are collectibles while guitars are no collectibles.

 

Excuse my seriousness, please, but I dislike the Beanie Babies's performance and playability, at least for musical applications. [scared]

;)

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I'm with you, Pip.

 

To my understanding RCT wanted to say that Beanie Babies are collectibles while guitars are no collectibles.

 

Excuse my seriousness, please, but I dislike the Beanie Babies's performance and playability, at least for musical applications. [scared]

;)

If you put a Floyd trem on a Beanie Babie, it looses it's collector value anyway.

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I'm gonna join the majority chorus here and say sell it and cut your losses and get what you now know you really want.

 

When the 2015s came out I honestly gave them a shot. I played several in stores (the G-Force on all of them was completely unreliable in store... would have definitely pulled it immediately had I bought one) and contemplated getting one more than a few times... but I knew deep down that it was destined to be a short term relationship. And the more I kept going back to the stores to play them more, the more the wide neck irritated me and the more the other 2015 "improvements" (he said with a sneer [glare] ) sure seemed like anything but. [thumbdn]

 

In the end I didn't get one and I'm so very glad I didn't (because I wouldn't have been happy and I'd be in the exact same dilemma as you right now, I know I would). As can be seen in my sig line, I ended up with a 2014 Trad instead (waaaay better and I for one like the 12th fret inlay [flapper] ). And recently, I picked up a brand new 2016 Trad. Both of my two Trads are awesome examples and you couldn't give me a room full of 2015s for them.

 

In the end... if you're not "digging" it... it's time to move on. Luckily it's a relatively economic model (Junior) you're gonna take the hit on, which will mitigate your losses (just think if you'd have paid $3800 for a 2015 Standard... you'd lose half that in resale now probably [crying] ).

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