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What about Pyramid Western Folk Strings (Germany made)?


gotomsdos

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Hi, old folks out there !

I'm buying new strings for my Ren's J-35 reissue...

Used(I fingerpick):

Thomastik-Infeld 'Spectrum' 012

DR 'Sunbeam'012

They're OK,

Just wanna hunt for a maybe better tone...

Just heard of Pyramid Western Folk(Germany-made ?), seems very popular.

Any guy who ever used it on your J-45/J-35 or the like ?

Any input would be appreciated.

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A picker could go nuts with this string stuff. I've heard of the brand you mention, but don't know anything about them. Seems there are as many brands and coatings and metals as there are stars in the sky. Years ago I used to try all kinds of different brands, but man that can drive you crazy and get expensive. I was always hearing someone else's guitar and wanting to know what strings were on it. Finally, I figured what-the-hell? In most cases strings are strings and they're all affected by heat, temperature, humidity, dirt, greasy fingers, age, and if the cat licked them. For years now, I primarily stick with Martins. I've got some Gibson Masterbilts left, but they're harder to find on sale, so I usually get the Martins. Used Elixers a few times, but they're too expensive for me, and besides, the Martins work well. On Elixers I'd hear people say you can't play them once the coating wears off. Hell, I'd play them until the steel and bronze wore off. Tried some Ernie Ball Aluminum Bronze a few months ago. Bought three packs and gave two away because they were way-too-brassy and bright for me. Then a couple months later, the guy I gave them to was playing and his guitar sounded pretty good. I asked him what strings he had on it and he said "the ones you gave me." Like I said, it can drive you insane.......My advice is to try some brands out for a while and see what you think. Then try to settle on one or two of them. I do find that some brands are easier on my fingers.

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A picker could go nuts with this string stuff. I've heard of the brand you mention, but don't know anything about them. Seems there are as many brands and coatings and metals as there are stars in the sky. Years ago I used to try all kinds of different brands, but man that can drive you crazy and get expensive. I was always hearing someone else's guitar and wanting to know what strings were on it. Finally, I figured what-the-hell? In most cases strings are strings and they're all affected by heat, temperature, humidity, dirt, greasy fingers, age, and if the cat licked them. For years now, I primarily stick with Martins. I've got some Gibson Masterbilts left, but they're harder to find on sale, so I usually get the Martins. Used Elixers a few times, but they're too expensive for me, and besides, the Martins work well. On Elixers I'd hear people say you can't play them once the coating wears off. Hell, I'd play them until the steel and bronze wore off. Tried some Ernie Ball Aluminum Bronze a few months ago. Bought three packs and gave two away because they were way-too-brassy and bright for me. Then a couple months later, the guy I gave them to was playing and his guitar sounded pretty good. I asked him what strings he had on it and he said "the ones you gave me." Like I said, it can drive you insane.......My advice is to try some brands out for a while and see what you think. Then try to settle on one or two of them. I do find that some brands are easier on my fingers.

 

Kind of agree with that. I tend to try different kind of strings but in the end, i have to wait at least 1 or 2 weeks before i get a sound that pleases me. So alot of time is needed to test a lot of strings, and after a while, when the sound becomes pleasant, you can't remember how the previous ones sounded anyway.

 

Got some Elixirs on my hummy at this time, but they sounded too bright at start, they hide the mellow of the hummy when brand new. With time it starts to get better and better though, but i guess i prefered gibson masterbuilt because it seemed that they get better faster (age faster).

 

Have no clue about these pyramid.

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Tricky question, since "nice sounding" is inevitably a function of the ear of the listener.

 

Right... I just don't really like metallic/bright sound that strings often have when new. Some strings keep this kind of behaviour for longer than others (basically, coated ones).

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I had been meaning to try these, and after reading what you guys wrote, now I feel I have to try them! The only kinds of strings I want to use anymore are strings that don't have a break-in period. (In reality, I have begun to suspect that all strings have a break-in period, but for some, it is dramatic and lasts a long time... and I hate it. That was my experience with the Martin Lifespans. Elixirs don't seem as bad.

 

I also agree with MP--it will drive a fella crazy. And some strings, for sure, that sound bad out of the box (relative--bad to me is brassy) break in and sound phenomenal.

 

For what it's worth, I've found that the Gibson 80/20s don't seem to have a break-in period... a very short and subtle one, at most. I don't know as they are the strings I want to use on everything forever more though. I think I'd like these Pyramid Western Folks, and I bet they last a long time.

 

Some other strings I have now and want to try that I hope are similar to how you guys describe these...

 

DR Rares

John Pearse Phosphor and Silk

Martin Retros (have tried the Tony Rice and didn't like them, but I don't think I gave them time to break in... but honestly maybe life is too short to have to break strings in)

 

Just went through my closet and found an absolute hoard of strings... I need to just liquidate them and start from scratch with the ones I listed above, I think.

 

I used JP Pure Nickels for ages because they don't seem to have too bad of a break-in, and they do sound darn good, but I think trying the 80/20s on my Hummingbird and J-15 made me miss the sound of bronze. Put some Pure Nickels on the 'Bird, and they do sound great, but I think the 80/20 sounded better, and I also think there's probably something I could try on it that'll be even better than the 80/20 Gibsons (no one seems to like them!).

 

Short version of this post: The Pyramid Western Folks are on my "to try" list for sure, now even more so.

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I just changed strings on my J45 and finally put on a set of these Western Folk strings. FWIW I love mellow sounding strings, and these strings are mellowwwwww. I like them as of the moment. I'll play them more in the next two weeks. I cant play anymore today,as my fingers are pretty sore.

 

They do remind me of Sunbeams, which I will try next on this guitar. Possibly the best way I can describe these right now is to picture Martin Retro Lights (monel). You have that picture and sound in your ear? These are the opposite.

 

I like low tension strings. I dont flatpick, and I dont need to "cut through in the mix". I just need comfortable mellow warm strings, and when I need to "cut through in the mix" I'll turn the amp up to eleven.

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Yep, thats also how i hear them Sal.

Mellow and warm but also highly articulate. They do remind me a lot to Sunbeams but I find the Sunbeams sort of 'splash' their colour palate like a beam, hence Sunbeams ? (the maple jumbo loves em) they dont have quite the same articulation as the Pyramids.

 

Looking forward to the next update.

 

I just changed strings on my J45 and finally put on a set of these Western Folk strings. FWIW I love mellow sounding strings, and these strings are mellowwwwww. I like them as of the moment. I'll play them more in the next two weeks. I cant play anymore today,as my fingers are pretty sore.

 

They do remind me of Sunbeams, which I will try next on this guitar. Possibly the best way I can describe these right now is to picture Martin Retro Lights (monel). You have that picture and sound in your ear? These are the opposite.

 

I like low tension strings. I dont flatpick, and I dont need to "cut through in the mix". I just need comfortable mellow warm strings, and when I need to "cut through in the mix" I'll turn the amp up to eleven.

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Yep, thats also how i hear them Sal.

Mellow and warm but also highly articulate. They do remind me a lot to Sunbeams but I find the Sunbeams sort of 'splash' their colour palate like a beam, hence Sunbeams ? (the maple jumbo loves em) they dont have quite the same articulation as the Pyramids.

 

Looking forward to the next update.

 

 

They should sound a lot like Sunbeams, as the construction would appear to be very similar, specifically the round core, which yields lower tension for a given nominal gauge.

 

I just did a quick check on other specs on the Western Folk, the "regular" Pyramids, and the Sunbeams. One thing I noticed is that both the Western Folk and the Sunbeams have a .054 low E, compared to the .052 of the regular Pyramid, and the .053 of the Masterbuilt Premiums. But, the Western Folk strings also have heavier G and B strings than the Sunbeams, which might suggest a bit more volume than the Sunbeams. (Note that the .012-.054 Sunbeams are called "mediums", even though they are comparable to the lights in the Western Folk, the regular Pyramid, and the Masterbuilts.)

 

I'm not really sure how much difference these very small differences in string diameter might have, or whether they are from differences in the wrap or the core. They do suggest a slightly different balance, however. To me they suggest a bit more bass/mid bias than the Sunbeams.

 

I'll try the Western Folk at some point, but here in the US they cost almost twice as much as the Sunbeams.

 

I've been using the Sunbeams on all my Gibson flat tops for the last couple of years, and I really like them.

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What I should disclose is that actually when I refer to Pyramids, the ones I use are NOT the western folks, but the standard ones.

 

Ive never tried the Western Folk ones, but love these ones. Its an added bonus that they only cost around 4 euro a packet on this side of the pond.

 

I normally order 20 packets a shot.

 

http://www.thomann.de/gb/pyramid_western_strings_012_052.htm

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What I should disclose is that actually when I refer to Pyramids, the ones I use are NOT the western folks, but the standard ones.

 

Ive never tried the Western Folk ones, but love these ones. Its an added bonus that they only cost around 4 euro a packet on this side of the pond.

 

I normally order 20 packets a shot.

 

http://www.thomann.de/gb/pyramid_western_strings_012_052.htm

 

 

Now that's really confusing! On the Pyramid website, the ones with the "Western" name are the Western Folk, which is a different string, at least in the diameters in a set of lights. Not sure why Thomann calls these "Western".

 

By the way, in the Euro zone, the Pyramids sell for exactly the same thing as the Sunbeams do in the US.

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Funny you should mention... I have a set of flexcore light mediums on my D35 now.... I love them.

 

Aha ^ , , , well I'll take that as a recommendation and shall try them on mine at some point.

 

But as mentioned they won't go on the HD-28V, which is much mellower by nature than the heavier braced, normal shifted 35.

 

Btw a tiny bell tells me we touched this before during the recent Forum-D-35-momentum.

 

 

 

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