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Fun to hear someone else's opinion on your guitars


generaldreedle

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Two totally different guitars. different shape,different woods, structures are different , different playability... so comparing doesnt really amount to anything... compare a D18 against a Hummingbird , a Rosewood highend d--eadnaught Gibson against a d45.. I forgot ,Gibson doesnt have one..

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That is real interesting...especially the part about the Gibson being harder to play. Is that the way you see it?

 

I don't find either hard to play, although I can understand why many feel the Martin's, certain ones, are to some people.

 

Tonally, I guess I can see a case where someone used to a Martin might feel like the Gibby has some there in it by "working for it". But looking at it the other way, being able to pound on the strings of a D-28 to get that well-known D-28 "cannon" thing going would be a practiced skill as well.

 

I guess the real fun is playing someone else's guitar, that you are familiar with, and gaining insight to their playing.

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That is real interesting...especially the part about the Gibson being harder to play. Is that the way you see it?

 

I don't find either hard to play, although I can understand why many feel the Martin's, certain ones, are to some people.

 

Tonally, I guess I can see a case where someone used to a Martin might feel like the Gibby has some there in it by "working for it". But looking at it the other way, being able to pound on the strings of a D-28 to get that well-known D-28 "cannon" thing going would be a practiced skill as well.

 

I guess the real fun is playing someone else's guitar, that you are familiar with, and gaining insight to their playing.

 

 

For whatever reason, it seemed like the neck on the Martin is more user friendly, I think the J45 neck is slightly wider; I checked, out of curiosity, the scale is the same, the J45 Custom is rosewood, like the D28. I like them both, but we were playing (or attempting to play), Sweet Virginia -- and probably a gibson sounds best doing that anyway. Anything bluesy I like the gibson better, other things I like the D28 for.

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@Generaldreedle - Interesting comments.

 

 

Two totally different guitars. different shape,different woods, structures are different , different playability... so comparing doesnt really amount to anything...

 

Different woods? . I thought a D-28 was sitka and rosewood, same as the J-45 Custom. I would think comparing them based on the same tone woods amounts to something - even if it only amounts to that particular slope sounds better than that particular square, as in this case.

 

 

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For whatever reason, it seemed like the neck on the Martin is more user friendly, I think the J45 neck is slightly wider; I checked, out of curiosity, the scale is the same, the J45 Custom is rosewood, like the D28. I like them both, but we were playing (or attempting to play), Sweet Virginia -- and probably a gibson sounds best doing that anyway. Anything bluesy I like the gibson better, other things I like the D28 for.

 

 

The scale length of the J-45 Custom is listed by Gibson as 24.75", the same as all other J-45's. The D-28 is listed by Martin as having a scale length of 25.4". Some people find this difference in scale length noticeable when it comes to playing comfort.

 

Personally, I've found a number of other things to be more important in determining playing ease and comfort, such as fret style, neck profile, and neck set-up. Even different models and years of J-45's have significantly different levels of playing comfort to me.

 

Your experience may vary.

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The scale length of the J-45 Custom is listed by Gibson as 24.75", the same as all other J-45's. The D-28 is listed by Martin as having a scale length of 25.4". Some people find this difference in scale length noticeable when it comes to playing comfort.

 

Personally, I've found a number of other things to be more important in determining playing ease and comfort, such as fret style, neck profile, and neck set-up. Even different models and years of J-45's have significantly different levels of playing comfort to me.

 

Your experience may vary.

 

 

Yeah, I think I measured it wrong, the neck does seem easier on the D28, but not too much so. It's just interesting to get someone else's perspective -- it's always different in some ways than your own. I do think the D28 sounds mellower in many instances --- I love them both. Always interesting though, especially after spending some time on the AGF -- where I think this perspective about J45s compared to D28s would elicit howls of protest.

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Seems all this guitar stuff boils-down to what each person likes. Regarding opinions on our guitars, I figure the vast majority of them are favorable and they're from people who are just being nice. We see and hear it in our daily lives and in guitar forums. ......... And I think short scales are easier to play. Others don't think that.

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compare a D18 against a Hummingbird , a Rosewood highend d--eadnaught Gibson against a d45.. I forgot ,Gibson doesnt have one..

 

Hey Slim, what is it about the J-45 Custom that makes you think it's not a high end Rosewood dreadnaught?

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It's just interesting to get someone else's perspective -- it's always different in some ways than your own.

 

Couldn't agree more -

 

 

Talking square shouldered Gibson rosewood guitars, it often seems as if the Sparrow is forgotten.

 

http://www.gibson.co...rrow/Specs.aspx

 

A rose dread from Bozeman right there - comes in a serious dark-brown sunburst too.

 

http://media.musiciansfriend.com/is/image/MMGS7/Sparrow-Dreadnought-Acoustic-Guitar-Vintage-Sunburst/H75442000001000-00-500x500.jpg

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The Sparrow is an interesting guitar. I played one maybe 2-3 years ago at Guitar Center. Killer sound and it really tugged at me. A full-blown dreadnaught sound. I just couldn't get past the pick guard. To modern looking for me. But it was a really sweet instrument. I was under the impression that they were made for Musicians Friend and Sweetwater, but no one else. At times I've wondered why I walked away from it......Is it still being made?

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Talking square shouldered Gibson rosewood guitars, it often seems as if the Sparrow is forgotten.

 

 

Also the J-60, which is a pretty direct analog to the D-28: rosewood, long-scale, square-bodied dread. I don't see it in this year's line-up, but neither is the Sparrow.

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Neck profiles determine much of the comfort-level, along with whatever you are used to.

 

Despite the harder V-shape of my 1958 D28, it plays rather smoothly. Other Gibsons I've owned (2007 Hummingbird, 2003 Sheryl Crow CW, 2010 Dove) have fought me more. I've long blamed it on the 1.725 nut, but looking at how tiny the difference between it and a 1.69 nut, other factors must be at work. For some reason, my 2011 J-200 standard is 1.69. How did that happen? And, yes, it's easier than the other Gibsons mentioned but still not as easy as the D-28. However, my 1961 LG-3 with the 1.69nut has a neck profile that is easier than the D28, so go figure.

 

Obviously, it's all personal taste. Most prefer a wider nut and spacious fretboard. Perhaps it's my growing up with electrics that often feature a 1-5/8"nut that have spoiled me. I also prefer .11s. (By this profile, you'd think I'd be a Taylor guy, but I don't much care for their sound. Martin and Gibsons reach me.)

 

Believe me, I'd LOVE to find more modern Gibsons that comforted me the way the '60s models do.

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Also the J-60, , ,

 

Oh yes, of course - now I forgot that one, hehe. .

 

 

 

By the way we had a pretty magnificent thread some years ago where the Sparrow was up for discussion.

 

Remember the P-guard-scenery's artistic style took a severe amount of flak, , , ,and then suddenly the designer of the very motif chimed in and added to the exchange.

I think he had ordered the guitar as it is and luckily he was able to handle the whole thing in stretched arm.

Approached it from above and just went on being happy with his Gibson.

 

What a moment for this blessed Board.

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I had a J60. It wasn't titled "Bone Crusher" just because the name sounded cool. I think when I played a Sparrow, I compared it to the J60 for power. Anyway, two big and bold dreadnaughts. I just kind of thought the pick guard for the Sparrow looked more appropriate for more modern type guitars than it did for what I think of as Gibson's traditional look.

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Along with checking the action height as was mentioned earlier, Smurf had brought up the neck profile. Also- the 1 11/16" nut on the Martin could've made that guitar more comfy to the player's hand. String gauges the same?

 

 

And since the thread could be deciding which way it's going, here is the original thread Emin7 had referenced, with the creator of the controversial Sparrow checking in at post #53:

 

Sparrowguard link

 

 

1d334e1f-c549-4e5c-96b6-58e5978f0d3d_zpsm6otvern.png

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They had the Sparrow at the Seattle GC a while back. It sounded great, they were offering discounts on it, I just couldn't get past the pick guard. That sounds really juvenile, but I couldn't do it -- it was at the time I was looking for a guitar and got the J45 instead, so it worked out ok anyway.

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Another factor in playability are neck dimensions. In addition to nut width, guitars of the same model with the same neck profiles can vary quite a bit in thickness when measured at various frets up and down the neck.

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Along with checking the action height as was mentioned earlier, Smurf had brought up the neck profile. Also- the 1 11/16" nut on the Martin could've made that guitar more comfy to the player's hand. String gauges the same?

 

 

And since the thread could be deciding which way it's going, here is the original thread Emin7 had referenced, with the creator of the controversial Sparrow checking in at post #53:

 

Sparrowguard link

 

 

1d334e1f-c549-4e5c-96b6-58e5978f0d3d_zpsm6otvern.png

 

I think the general consensus was that the guitar itself was a good complement to the Bozeman lineup at the time, but that the pickguard made it a no-go. The crux of the problem with the pickguard, and it's somewhat 'cartoonish' look - was the fact that the eye of the sparrow was especially creepy.

As far as getting others' opinions of your guitar - really doesn't matter to me. Even if it were a top level player - his preferences, for the kind of music he plays and how he plays it - has no bearing on me. I know what I like, and if some guy I play with says he likes my guitar - fine. He's validating and flattering me just as if he said he likes my shoes. If he says he doesn't like it. Fine. Don't care.

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