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J-200 Back From The Shop


zombywoof

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I picked up my wife's 1960 J-200 the other day. It had been up at the shop getting a top crack fixed and a second pickguard that had been added removed (and was covering two repaired but not touched up cracks). When the pickguard came off it was discovered the finish had been sanded down so my repair guy had to work some of his wizardy on re-applying and blending the finish. To top it all off he gave the guitar a good buffing and it just sparkles now like the true diamond it is.

 

Here is a pic (crappy but all I have) of the soundhole area as it was. Worse yet, the pickguard was originally black and painted the reddish brown color.

 

20ba765d-9a1e-4671-8eb2-bf0c354155f3_zpsn6vn39rr.jpg

 

 

And here it be today. You can still see a faint outline of where the scratchplate was but all in all I could not be happier.

 

Gibson%20J-200%20001_zpsx9iobxad.jpg

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Good call to get it fixed, and a good job by your guy.

 

There's almost always some tough decisions to be made when returning guitars like this (or my old J-45) to something approximating their original configuration. And there's not that many repair guys with the skills and historical sensitivity to do the job right.

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I am guessing the pickguard had been on for several decades. This thing was massively thick. We could have gone the cheaper route of touching up the finish around the repaired cracks and just applying a new thinner pickguard but I figured the guitar deserved better. The faint outline does not bother me as that second pickguard is just part of the guitar's history. The buffing though really brought the finish back to life. The guitar never looked as good as it now does.

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ZW,

 

wow a total stunner,

 

 

Is that the original bridge???

 

JC

 

 

Many thanks. The bridge is the original. When I got the guitar it had the brass bridge pins. I have swapped them out a couple of times but always seem to go back to them. My wife absolutely loves this guitar though. Nobody, including me, is getting it out of her hands.

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Looks fabulous now ... like a J-200 should. Interesting there is no change in tone, would imagine it would have impact taking a whole J-200 guard off. Well done.

 

 

I always figured the upper bout of the guitar does not come into play near as much as the lower bout and the J-200 has plenty of acreage down there. And this was never what I would call a loud guitar. It is also a pretty heavy instrument. Thing is it really needs to wake up after sitting dormant for so long. I will be able to judge it a bit better over the weekend after I go out and dig into it a few hours. Just wish I liked the neck on this guitar better than I do. But again, it is my wife's guitar and she prefers the thinner neck carve.

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I picked up my wife's 1960 J-200 the other day. It had been up at the shop getting a top crack fixed and a second pickguard that had been added removed (and was covering two repaired but not touched up cracks). When the pickguard came off it was discovered the finish had been sanded down so my repair guy had to work some of his wizardy on re-applying and blending the finish. To top it all off he gave the guitar a good buffing and it just sparkles now like the true diamond it is.

 

Here is a pic (crappy but all I have) of the soundhole area as it was. Worse yet, the pickguard was originally black and painted the reddish brown color.

 

20ba765d-9a1e-4671-8eb2-bf0c354155f3_zpsn6vn39rr.jpg

 

 

And here it be today. You can still see a faint outline of where the scratchplate was but all in all I could not be happier.

 

Gibson%20J-200%20001_zpsx9iobxad.jpg

 

 

 

That looks superb in the photo - huge improvement!

 

 

(Why did people add the extra p/g - was it a Dylan thing at the time?)

 

 

BluesKing777.

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This is the perfect advertisement for a nitro finish. No matter the age of the finish the guitar can be easily repaired. Over spraying is absolutely no problem and the new portion can be wet sanded and buffed to blend in perfectly with the original finish.

 

All the folks with scratches and abrasions take note. They can be easily and inexpensively fixed. Just make sure your repair tech has a proper spray booth. Ask to see some of his work. Or you can just send it to Gibson repair.

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