Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

John Lennons J160


Allie

Recommended Posts

I see on the internet (Yahoo I think) this morning that John Lennon's long lost Gibson has resurfaced and is going to the auction block...it's expected to fetch a million or more, I was going to keep this under my hat but have had something else pop up so my millions are all accounted for. :) and being the nice guy that I am I'm gonna pass the chance off to you fine people. [thumbup]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We'll, I'm heading for my sock drawer!!! Glad I have held off on any gear for about a year to have some spare cash around. :rolleyes:

 

Would be nice, esp. if it came with the ability to play it like John (what the hell, throw in sing like him too). [biggrin]

 

Aster

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been fascinated by this guitar for years; since finding out it had been "stolen" back in '63. Beatles gearheads have been having arguments over this guitar and its significance.

 

John and George received their identical 1963 J160e guitars at Rushworth's September 10, 1962. Here they are the way they look in 2015 with John's on the left and George's on the right:

 

10484917_841801972541596_8168907514895895154_o_zpsthbap5fl.jpg

 

Some maintain that it is NOT as significant a guitar as John's replacement J160e because the replacement was played for many years and has much more Beatles/Lennon mojo as a result. The replacement J160e is, of course, the one that eventually had its finish sanded off and then Lennon carved and Sharpie'd his caricatures of himself and Yoko on the top around the time of the Montreal "bed-in".

 

Others maintain the missing J160e, now that it has resurfaced after 51+ years, is the more significant guitar. Significant not only due to its mysterious disappearance and reappearance, but also because of its heavy use on the first Beatles album and the fact that songs like "She Loves You", "I Saw Her Standing There", “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” “Please, Please, Me,” “All My Loving,” “From Me to You,” and “This Boy" were written on this guitar.

 

I find them both fascinating but especially the missing one. The speculation for years was that it was stolen during a Christmas concert at the Finsbury Park Astoria in December 1963. With only one roadie, Mal Evans, carting all their gear in and out of each venue into their touring van, the guitar could have just been left behind as an oversight. The Beatles were not a world-wide phenomenon at the time and the guitar could have just been taken as a lost but not claimed item.

 

Regardless, the instrument found its way across the Atlantic and was purchased in a pawn shop in California and played for years by John McCaw not knowing what it was. Andy Babiuk has authenticated the instrument from wood grain and specific patterns in the pickguard. It also has Lennon's original pick wear on it.

 

It looks like it was sold at auction for $2,410,000.

 

 

J160e Auction

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been fascinated by this guitar for years; since finding out it had been "stolen" back in '63. Beatles gearheads have been having arguments over this guitar and its significance.

 

John and George received their identical 1963 J160e guitars at Rushworth's September 10, 1962. Here they are the way they look in 2015 with John's on the left and George's on the right:

 

10484917_841801972541596_8168907514895895154_o_zpsthbap5fl.jpg

 

Some maintain that it is NOT as significant a guitar as John's replacement J160e because the replacement was played for many years and has much more Beatles/Lennon mojo as a result. The replacement J160e is, of course, the one that eventually had its finish sanded off and then Lennon carved and Sharpie'd his caricatures of himself and Yoko on the top around the time of the Montreal "bed-in".

 

Others maintain the missing J160e, now that it has resurfaced after 51+ years, is the more significant guitar. Significant not only due to its mysterious disappearance and reappearance, but also because of its heavy use on the first Beatles album and the fact that songs like "She Loves You", "I Saw Her Standing There", “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” “Please, Please, Me,” “All My Loving,” “From Me to You,” and “This Boy" were written on this guitar.

 

I find them both fascinating but especially the missing one. The speculation for years was that it was stolen during a Christmas concert at the Finsbury Park Astoria in December 1963. With only one roadie, Mal Evans, carting all their gear in and out of each venue into their touring van, the guitar could have just been left behind as an oversight. The Beatles were not a world-wide phenomenon at the time and the guitar could have just been taken as a lost but not claimed item.

 

Regardless, the instrument found its way across the Atlantic and was purchased in a pawn shop in California and played for years by John McCaw not knowing what it was. Andy Babiuk has authenticated the instrument from wood grain and specific patterns in the pickguard. It also has Lennon's original pick wear on it.

 

It looks like it was sold at auction for $2,410,000.

 

 

J160e Auction

Thanks Drathbun for that information, very interesting indeed. I am glad I didn't pursue the auction though as I was 'a few dollars short' of the winning bid [biggrin]
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's a he11uva lot of pick wear for 1 year, since Johns primary guitars were electric, and they were gigging live a LOT in those days.

 

I would think John McCaw's pick wear would be far less valuable.........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been fascinated by this guitar for years; since finding out it had been "stolen" back in '63. Beatles gearheads have been having arguments over this guitar and its significance.

 

It looks like it was sold at auction for $2,410,000.

 

 

J160e Auction

 

 

Darn. I dropped out when the bidding got to $1.9 million. Didn't have time to get to the cash machine to up my bid by another half million.

 

Maybe next time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So say you dropped $2.41 million on John Lennon's J-160...now what? Do you sit at home of a night and play around with it and imagine you are John Lennon? Do you have to lock it away somewhere so it's secure and so difficult to get to that you only see and play it a couple of times a year? Is it even close to sounding right without the very Vox amp John plugged into? It calls to mind that final scene in The Candidate where Robert Redford wins and gets in the car and wonders what's next. Personally I think George's J-160 was the better looking of the two!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unless you're a mega-rich collector and/or know how to immediately re-sell it for a good profit, it's ridiculous to spend that amount of money on a guitar. Even if God made it and St. Peter played it, it's still just a guitar........What I could do for my family with 2.41 million! Even buy me a few Gibsons and Martins that sound even better than either of these two.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Unless it was converted the bridge should have been ceramic. All the photo's I've seen on both show the old style adj. bridge I think.

 

Aster

The pictures seem to show a ceramic saddle, but I believe the question is whether the bridge itself is plastic or wood. I can't tell from the pictures, but the lack of pearl dots over bolts suggest that it might be plastic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...