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Gibson Dove restoration


ballcorner

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Way cool!

 

Pretty slick and low-tech way of heating up the bridge for removal. I've got one of those heat lamps in my yard barn to take the edge of the chill when I'm working on my snow-blower in the winter. It has a white lamp, but I think they get just as hot. I may have to use that trick some day.

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I mean you have to applaude the restoration.....BUT don't you think it is amazing that a guitar can leave the Gibson Factory with an incorrect bridge location AND it was still sold????? Unbelievable....I don't know about your guys, but if I had bought a guitar off of Evil-bay, and it was not disclosed that it needed a neck reset or was a factory second, the least I would have done is given the seller a bad review. I would have sent that guitar back in a silly second.

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I mean you have to applaude the restoration.....BUT don't you think it is amazing that a guitar can leave the Gibson Factory with an incorrect bridge location AND it was still sold????? Unbelievable....I don't know about your guys' date=' but if I had bought a guitar off of Evil-bay, and it was not disclosed that it needed a neck reset or was a factory second, the least I would have done is given the seller a bad review. I would have sent that guitar back in a silly second. [/quote']

 

A bad guitar leaving a good factory is always simple human error. It's not exactly uncommon.

 

My HD-28V came straight from Martin in need of a neck reset. This stuff happens more often with Martin than it ever does with Gibson because Martin is trying to outperform the Chinese in production the past few years - but it happens everywhere from time to time.

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Ballcorner....if it is marked 2nd....it wasn't a mistake....they knew it was faulty. This is not "B" stock problem, a finish blemish or a defect in the wood....The intonation was out!!! You can't sell a guitar knowingly with the intonation out by that much.....oh wait.....I guess you can.... I guess every factory has it's moments, I believe that Martin destroys all it's blemished or second stock....

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Ballcorner....if it is marked 2nd....it wasn't a mistake....they knew it was faulty. This is not "B" stock problem' date=' a finish blemish or a defect in the wood....The intonation was out!!! You can't sell a guitar knowingly with the intonation out by that much.....oh wait.....I guess you can.... I guess every factory has it's moments, I believe that Martin destroys all it's blemished or second stock....[/quote']

 

Martin destroys repair returns as well, from time to time, and I am hoping that will be the case with my HD-28V instead of gambling on a neck reset - even though it would be a factory job.

 

When I worked in music retail, I once took in some stock from a major manufacturer that included two right handed guitars with left handed bridges (try that for intonation problems) and inline tuning keys that functioned backwards - unfortunately it was only four of the six on that particular guitar.

 

I got a bolt on neck electric that was a full quarter inch out of scale - so I had to grind the roller saddles back to make up the difference and the following week I got another guitar the same model that was 1/8" out of scale in the opposite direction.

 

It took side by side analysis of the two guitars in parts to realize the CNC router had miscut the neck pockets in the bodies - probably due to dull cutters and a jig that jumped on the suction table.

 

I think there should be a law that any guitar leaving any factory in the world must have the intonation set and checked then certified before shipping. I have encountered about 4 every year that I worked in retail that couldn't be fixed and weren't labeled as B stock or seconds.

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i think the example in this case points towards a different gibson than the one that makes guitars today.

 

If i remember correctly one of the major changes after it was bought in the mid 80's by Henry Juszkiewicz was the destruction of substandard instruments rather than their sale as factory seconds.

 

Ahh - and i just found the article i was thinking of...

 

The problem was that dealers were not necessarily telling their consumers that seconds were seconds. So I got into the factory and I picked up a guitar. Got the employees around. "See this guitar," I said. "This guitar says Gibson on it, and it's not Gibson quality. So, here's what we do." I took the guitar, and I smashed it on the factory floor.

 

Here's a link to the entire interview, enjoy:

 

http://www.usatoday.com/money/companies/management/2006-02-20-forum-gibson_x.htm

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Much of the time, the reason a guitar was marked as a second was purely cosmetic - frequently a flaw in the finish or sunburst. I have a 48 SJ factory second and have never been able to figure out why it's a second. It plays great and seems just fine structurally. I figure that 60 years of playwear have obscured whatever the issue was.

 

But just like yours, mine was sold to me without being identified as a second. I was just checking out what looked like a ding on the back of the headstock one day and realized it was a numeral "2" stamped in it. Rats.

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