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qwertypants

1968 Gibson ES-335 - fair price?

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I saw this listed and I wanted to see if the price was fair before i go and take a look

 

Its a 1968 335, only 2 owners. 100% Original. According to the listing it was bought in 1968, and stored since 1973 before purchased by the 2nd owner. Price is $5000 USD

 

Also even though i think its awesome to own a vintage 335 would anyone think i'd be better off spending less and getting a later 335?

 

Appreciate any help.

 

Pics:

 

ES335_1.jpg

 

ES335_2.jpg

 

ES335_3.jpg

 

ES335_4.jpg

 

ES335_5.jpg

 

ES335_6.jpg

 

ES335_7.jpg

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That price would be a steal in the UK.

$5k = £3,330 (GBP)....unmissable for a guitar like that if it all checks out ok.

Looks good!

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You can buy TWO really nice 335's for that price. There is nothing really "vintage" or collectible about a '68 335. Gibson built nearly 5000 of them that year.

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You can buy TWO really nice 335's for that price. There is nothing really "vintage" or collectible about a '68 335. Gibson built nearly 5000 of them that year.

 

Yeah i totally get that. I am after something that plays well, feels great and has a trapeze tail piece and i am wondering if i am better off giving this a miss even though its a pretty good price!

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Qwerty, I'm thinking if the price is right in the U.S for that guitar, then you'd be better of with it rather than a new one, simply because it will hold it's value.

I know it's an older 335 but a mate of mine here in the U.K just traded his 1962 335 for a Porsche!

 

Ian

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You can buy TWO really nice 335's for that price. There is nothing really "vintage" or collectible about a '68 335. Gibson built nearly 5000 of them that year.

 

 

Yeah i totally get that. I am after something that plays well, feels great and has a trapeze tail piece and i am wondering if i am better off giving this a miss even though its a pretty good price!

 

 

Qwerty, I'm thinking if the price is right in the U.S for that guitar, then you'd be better of with it rather than a new one, simply because it will hold it's value.

I know it's an older 335 but a mate of mine here in the U.K just traded his 1962 335 for a Porsche!

 

Ian

It's really hard to judge what these are worth, and what they WILL be worth. During the "vintage craze" and the following "crash", I've seen values for old 335's all over the place.

 

Heck, NEW prices are all over the place the past 5 years or so.

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Are you buying it as an investment? Or something you plan to play frequently and enjoy. I'm not really into collectibles - yeah, they generally increase in value but if 5000 similar units were made that year I doubt you will see your "investment" do much better than inflation. For my $ - buy a later model used 335 that you will love to play, take care of it and it will hold its value just a well -IMHO.

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From the photos, it looks like a 'Time Capsule' guitar, and I'm surprised it hasn't already been snatched up @ $5K; a true bargain at that price, in my humble opinion...

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From the photos, it looks like a 'Time Capsule' guitar, ...

 

This may be true, but from a "vintage/collectible" standpoint (quotes used intentionally), this 335 contains almost all the UNDESIRABLE features in the history of 335 building:

 

Double-ring Klusons

Block inlays

Plain top, plain back

Witchhat knobs

Trapeze tailpiece

 

The only things it doesn't have from the dark era is a maple neck with a volute. These are all features which were changed for the original "reissues", and most production models to this day. This is the way this guitar is viewed in the "market".

 

These features don't necessarily have anything to do with sound, condition or playability, and it may be a great guitar, but... unfortunately for the seller, it has a lot to do with "market value".

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well i went and played it today, fell in love and long story short i'm the new proud owner of a '68 335!

Congrats

 

4H

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well i went and played it today, fell in love and long story short i'm the new proud owner of a '68 335!

THAT'S the way a guitar SHOULD be bought!

 

You have my respect, and as far as I am concerned, a completely fair price whatever it ended up being.

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"fell in love"

 

And isn't that really what it's all about? She's a gorgeous 'closet queen' and will bring you enjoyment for years to come!

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Qwerty, I'm thinking if the price is right in the U.S for that guitar, then you'd be better of with it rather than a new one, simply because it will hold it's value.

I know it's an older 335 but a mate of mine here in the U.K just traded his 1962 335 for a Porsche!

 

Ian

 

You can sleep in your Porsche. You can't drive a house. Heck. You can't drive OR sleep in a 335. Um. Oh what the heck. Get the 335!

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Well done. Sure, you could have bought a couple of new ones for that but I don't think anyone will dispute that the older guitars have a particular vibe.

 

Also, I disagree with the gentlemen who felt that that era had all the least favourite features of a 335. Maybe to collectors but they don't always actually play their instruments. I'm pretty sure Larry Carltons 335 was a '69 (not 100% sure). It has block inlays. It had a trapeze. He replaced that but it gave him the option to locate the stop tail piece very specifically. I'd love to know what the significance is. It's almost twice as far from the bridge as stock. For sure that positioning will decrease the angle of the strings over the saddles. ( Personally, not only would I be interested to hear the difference a trapeze would make to the sound of my dot reissue but I'd love to see what a floating wood bridge would sound like.) I also think the '69s have a very narrow neck, narrow across the nut. If you like a narrow neck I think your going to be happy.

 

I'm envious.

 

Cheers

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Qwerty, I'm thinking if the price is right in the U.S for that guitar, then you'd be better of with it rather than a new one, simply because it will hold it's value.

I know it's an older 335 but a mate of mine here in the U.K just traded his 1962 335 for a Porsche!

 

Ian

 

It was a tragic mix up. He thought he was getting a super rare ES356 but he ended up with a clapped out 356 Speedster! :)

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Personally, not only would I be interested to hear the difference a trapeze would make to the sound of my dot reissue but I'd love to see what a floating wood bridge would sound like.

 

What's nice is you can experiment with both a trapeze tailpiece and wooden bridge without making any physical modifications to your guitar.

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What's nice is you can experiment with both a trapeze tailpiece and wooden bridge without making any physical modifications to your guitar.

Is a trapeze only held in place by the strap lug or does it need more screws? I haven't looked at one for a while.

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Is a trapeze only held in place by the strap lug or does it need more screws? I haven't looked at one for a while.

 

Yep, the strap button is the only thing that secures it to the guitar. [smile]

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qwertypants,

 

Not that many people hold much stock in what the Blue Book has to say, but you paid the right price for that ES-335.

 

I kind of like that the guitar was made in the same year that we were all enjoying hearing such great music on the a.m. radio.

 

Green Tambourine, by The Lemonpipers

Hey Jude, by The Beatles

Sunshine Of Your Love, by Cream

Mony Mony, by Tommy James and the Shondells

 

 

Great guitar, great times!!

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Is a trapeze only held in place by the strap lug or does it need more screws? I haven't looked at one for a while.

 

Trapeze tailpiece are not held in place by the strap button, no: there are three extra screws holding it in place. I've installed Bigsby B6s on to guitars that originally had trapezes and got away with using only the top two holes plus a long strap button screw and they work fine but just the strap button screw on its own would worry me.

 

I've seen a tail gut give up the ghost on a double bass and it was a pretty heart stopping moment - better to be safe than sorry when it comes to tailpieces!

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