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Finding a band for teens?


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One of my friend's son (isaak) had been getting into trouble but had a cheap bullet strat he loved. The frets sucked and it wasnt comfortable to play, but he really wanted to play guitar, so my girlfriend and i gave him an Epiphone SG, it really was one of the best Epiphones ive ever had. The kid loved it, he played that sucker everyday and his mother can now identify modern rock songs he's playing without him telling which makes him glow with confidence. He has been trying to make a band but he seems to have a problem with it. The problem being every kid he recruits is only interested in carrying a guitar, bass or snare drum for the "cool factor" but none of the kids at his school have the motivation to actually practice and get better. They just want to carry an instrument to pick up girls, he is getting a little frustrated that the kids have no interest in being a serious musician. With his skills improving he wants a band, he wants to play live and earn money doing it.

 

Anyone got any tips on how a teen can find other teens who want to make an actual band? He's still only a kid, about 15 years old so obviously he cant play a nightclub yet, but he has all the motivation to become a serious musician. I am a little worried if he cannot find a band he will lose interest and perhaps get into mischief again, the guitar really channelled his energy into something positive. I would love to see him play live someday. Any ideas?

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If he gets lessons at the local guitar store or music college or suchlike, then a notice on the board might be useful or just talk to the teachers there and they might be able to steer him towards like minded and skilled kids - usually there will be kids learning bass, drums, keys etc.

 

Here's my 2 nephews (lead guitar and bass) band of schoolkids with a recording they did a while back as inspiration - they did it and I'm sure Isaak will too!

 

 

http://www.triplejunearthed.com/jukebox/play/track/4292216

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What an age. No telling where and when this or that will lead to.

 

I guess one thing I might say, is a little patience. 15 is really hard to find others of real ability to play with, but as he gets older, others including him will get better. And once he gets mobile, it's gonna explode into possibly one of the best times of his life.

 

BUT..in the meantime, one of the best things an older guy can do for a younger guy is use the guitar as a mutual interest, to not only spend time but to influence in all areas.

 

I suggest, with respect for those wiser than me, you jam with him, teach him to play, and let the chips fall where they may.

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At that age, my son auditioned for the guitar chair in the highschool jazz band. It is a real competition each year with many coveting the position, but only 2 or 3 contenders that can really play. My son was chosen. A year in the jazz band was great for his confidence and ability.

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So strange these days...... When I was 15, (back in the 70's)..lol.... Finding people to jam with was easy [confused]

 

But these days I rarely see teenagers jamming in bands.

 

Back to your question.... Have the young guy talk to people in the high school marching band.... I'll bet he will find a drummer and bass player somewhere in there

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So, here's my two cents.

 

Think about getting the kid an acoustic. If the kid's into music but can't find others to play with, then encourage him to make music on his own until he can find other like minded and dedicated musicians.

 

I have found that there's no better training ground than an acoustic. If you play a great speed metal electric, you may stink on acoustic, but get good on an acoustic, and you can play anything.

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Yea, it was much easier back in the 70s to find "kindred" spirits, when I was back in school you were either a jock,(most were, or wanted to be) or, you played in a rock band (or you wanted to)

 

I started at the age of 8, by the time I was in in high school, I was playing with guys much older than me, and not to brag but some of them had to work at it to keep up with ME. All I did was play guitar, that was it. too small for sports, and I was bored with what the "hood" kids liked to do.. (which was mostly hang around and listen to their older brothers records and steal their smokes, I was more interested in putting a zeppelin or deep purple album on the turn table and stealing licks)

 

a different world for kids these days.

 

the way I see this, the problem seems wide spread. they really don't seem to have any idea of what a commitment means when it comes to playing an instrument. With no reset button they soon come to the conclusion that it simply requires too much effort to practice at this' No ability to focus on anything for more than 50 seconds at at time and there has to be immediate gratification or "it's too hard".. Wahhh!!

 

 

I would second the advice to look for other players where lessons are taken, at least here there's a better chance of finding a few kids with a friggen clue.

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the way I see this, the problem seems wide spread. they really don't seem to have any idea of what a commitment means when it comes to playing an instrument. With no reset button they soon come to the conclusion that it simply requires too much effort to practice at this'

 

 

Damn straight. That's why I am virtually forcing my kids to play and to practice.

The seem to like it but they don't do it without me making them. And when they do well they are proud.

If they decide to quit when they get older that is fine with me. That is their choice.

At least I have given them the opportunity to have reading music and muscle memory to fall back on

if they ever decide they want to pursue it when they are older.

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Here in Maryland, we have a chain of schools called "School of Rock". Ive never been there, but the way I understand it is that its music lessons but it revolves around performance. They mach up the kids with other kids on the same level. Dont know if they have any locations up north or not.

 

http://www.schoolofrock.com/

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This thread, and other things got me thinking of my first band (a three piece) in 1973/74. Thankfully I have a picture of us [biggrin].

 

To this day I don't know the make of my first guitar, that gold top LesPaul Copy with no marking on the headstock. It's a bolt on neck with a zero fret. While it had a really thick paint job, I sanded it down to refinish it at one point. The neck was like a piece of plywood and the body was a bunch of small sticks glued together under with a veneer top. It played and sounded pretty good through my Music Man HD130 Combo though.

old_zpsjrawu3je.jpg

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Damn straight. That's why I am virtually forcing my kids to play and to practice.

The seem to like it but they don't do it without me making them. And when they do well they are proud.

If they decide to quit when they get older that is fine with me. That is their choice.

At least I have given them the opportunity to have reading music and muscle memory to fall back on

if they ever decide they want to pursue it when they are older.

 

 

That's kind of how I went about it to Quap. My daughter had clarinet lessons a few years back and recently I've been outside and heard her playing on it just for something to do and I say 'are you reading the music' and she says yes, so it seems to have stuck with her. Sounds nice too. My eldest son is 13 and will be doing music at school and starting a band with his mates next year. He had some lessons when he was young - in the photo below he was about 9 y.o, but hasn't played for a couple of years. I might need to upgrade the old 70's Aria SG with the bolt on neck for him though - it's not the best thing to play...

 

GuitarM_zps4c05031c.png

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This thread, and other things got me thinking of my first band (a three piece) in 1973/74. Thankfully I have a picture of us [biggrin].

 

To this day I don't know the make of my first guitar, that gold top LesPaul Copy with no marking on the headstock. It's a bolt on neck with a zero fret. While it had a really thick paint job, I sanded it down to refinish it at one point. The neck was like a piece of plywood and the body was a bunch of small sticks glued together under with a veneer top. It played and sounded pretty good through my Music Man HD130 Combo though.

old_zpsjrawu3je.jpg

 

that might have been an early Aria copy (MIJ). One of my class mates had something similar, I seem to recall that's what his was. I don't exactly recall the zero fret but I remember there were a few unusual things about it. (the bolt on neck being one)

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Damn straight. That's why I am virtually forcing my kids to play and to practice.

The seem to like it but they don't do it without me making them. And when they do well they are proud.

If they decide to quit when they get older that is fine with me. That is their choice.

At least I have given them the opportunity to have reading music and muscle memory to fall back on

if they ever decide they want to pursue it when they are older.

 

I can appreciate where you're coming from. My grandson has been taking drum lessons for about a year now. His practice commit is often a little lackadaisical, his drum teacher is really good though at calling it out when he knows he's been practicing. The positive reinforcement is good incentive. We've also upgraded a few of the pieces for his starter kit for Christmas, hoping that adds a bit of a spark. he wants a better drum set of course, but, we're holding the line on that till he's more committed. He's got a lot of natural ability, so we're hoping he sticks with it.

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That's kind of how I went about it to Quap. My daughter had clarinet lessons a few years back and recently I've been outside and heard her playing on it just for something to do and I say 'are you reading the music' and she says yes, so it seems to have stuck with her.

That's awesome man. That's what I hope for.

My kids complain about having to practice but damn they have a blast when they

do it and they are full of energy when they are done.

 

 

 

I can appreciate where you're coming from. My grandson has been taking drum lessons for about a year now. His practice commit is often a little lackadaisical, his drum teacher is really good though at calling it out when he knows he's been practicing.

My boy is 13. He plays the drums as well. He has a great teacher and is learning to read which is really cool.

If I left practice up to my boy it would never happen so I have to force it. I hope someday he thanks me. lol.

The upside of me forcing him is his teacher is always impressed at how well prepared he is.

 

 

Dude, your kid has the best rock and roll hair ever! [thumbup]

lol,, you beat me to it Surf. Exactly what I was going to say.

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... none of the kids at his school have the motivation to actually practice and get better. They just want to carry an instrument to pick up girls, he is getting a little frustrated that the kids have no interest in being a serious musician.

 

Seems to me that finding a good band for teens is not much different than finding a good band for grown-ups! [biggrin] Just once I'd love to be the least motivated member of a band instead of the most! :rolleyes:

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So strange these days...... When I was 15, (back in the 70's)..lol.... Finding people to jam with was easy [confused]

 

But these days I rarely see teenagers jamming in bands.

 

Back to your question.... Have the young guy talk to people in the high school marching band.... I'll bet he will find a drummer and bass player somewhere in there

I think he's in a smaller school being in the middle of a tiny mass city, but thanks duane and thanks everyone else for your advice. Ill pass these tips along to him. Maybe someday ill have him post a video up here for you all to see. His mother gave him an acoustic for Christmas and he's in heaven. This year im starting up a business idea, if it ever comes to fruition id like to get the kid a Gibson les paul studio, according to his mom he plays everyday for hours. When someone gave me a guitar in the 90s it was the most special experience one could imagine.

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