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US Tornadoes


Rabs

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Tornado's are not fun. I lived in Atlanta in the late '90's and had a couple of tornado scares. People used think I was nuts for living in SoCal (earthquake country). I laughed and said that eq's show up with no warning, and are over in a matter of seconds, and more than likely, all you're going to get is a little shaking going on. With tornado's, it's kind of the same but they can last much longer, do significantly more damage and they show up several times a year. Same goes for hurricanes in Florida. Who's nuts? I'll take the eq's anyday of the week.

 

Good thoughts going out to all those impacted by the recent wave of tornado's.

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Best wishes to all impacted.

 

Dennis, from afar the U.S. has such an amazing array of climate extremes - extreme deserts, extreme cold, extreme humidity, etc..and and 'event' type weather/geological occurrences. I look forward to checking it out someday, quite fascinating comparison to our relatively stable conditions here in a similar sized country.

 

Is there anywhere in the U.S. that has reasonably stable conditions year round (excluding Alaska where I assume it's just cold)? Looking at the map I'd hazard a guess at West Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, and Kansas, but I really have no idea. An amazing country whichever way you look at it. [thumbup]

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Dennis, from afar the U.S. has such an amazing array of climate extremes

Is there anywhere in the U.S. that has reasonably stable conditions year round (excluding Alaska where I assume it's just cold)? Looking at the map I'd hazard a guess at West Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, and Kansas, but I really have no idea. An amazing country whichever way you look at it. [thumbup]

Interesting observation. Yeah, we have a whole lot of weather variations. I grew up in upstate NY and endured cold and snow in the winter, hot and humid (rain) in the summer. I now live in Southern California, and we even have "micro climates". The weather will vary within a 20 or 30 mile radius. For example, beach weather is different than the foothills, valleys, or even 5 miles inland from the coast. All in all though, other than our four year drought, your best bet is the desert areas (usually warm and dry most of the year with no temp extremes except in the winter when it can get real cold after sundown.

 

Your above mentioned states have a lot of weather fluctuations, not to mention being a part of "tornado alley".

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1450989683[/url]' post='1724109']

Best wishes to all impacted.

 

Dennis, from afar the U.S. has such an amazing array of climate extremes - extreme deserts, extreme cold, extreme humidity, etc..and and 'event' type weather/geological occurrences. I look forward to checking it out someday, quite fascinating comparison to our relatively stable conditions here in a similar sized country.

 

Is there anywhere in the U.S. that has reasonably stable conditions year round (excluding Alaska where I assume it's just cold)? Looking at the map I'd hazard a guess at West Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, and Kansas, but I really have no idea. An amazing country whichever way you look at it. [thumbup]

 

And you forgot Yellowstone National park. The entire state of Wyoming is nothing but a Mega Super Volcano. It's a silent volcano waiting to erupt whenever it wishes. All the years I've visited the park from a child to an adult teen, each year has brought changes. Some years have active mud pits and volcanic springs that have minerals in them and other years they dry up and sprout up somewhere else and then come back decades later. A very interesting Park. Rangers have told us stories of people and kids that disappeared in the mineral looking springs. They look colorfull and inviting to take a dip, but they are almost boiling hot and people who have jumped in were burnt and disappeared in its deep crevice's. Mud pits have erupted and severely burnt spectacles before I've been told. They move the board walks back further when it happens. I remember as a kid, this huge thousands of acres were nothing but graze grass for the wildlife. Every year I've visited was the same. After I married and the wife wanted to see it, I was surprised to see the same acreage nothing but volcanic pits everywhere. Experts say if Yellowstone was to ever explode like Mount St Helons did, half of the United States would be gone in the eruption. The reason I've seen it every year is because my mother had brothers and sisters that lived out west as far as California and we visited all of them each and every year in July always going through Yellowstone.

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Tornadoes, this time of year, is pretty "odd!" But, our overall weather has been odd, this year, as well.

El Nino effects, supposedly. As to Tornadoes or Earthquakes? Well, I was born and raised here, in Kansas,

and then moved to So Cal, for 30 years, so I've been through both! Now, Kansas and Oklahoma have BOTH!

We just had a 4.7 Earthquake, a couple of weeks ago, and have had several similar sized one's, this year

alone. All the "Fracking" has seriously increased the amount of earthquakes, in this area. Tornadoes just

go with living in "Tornado Alley!" But, earthquakes were rare here, though not unheard of, until the oil

fracking started.

 

Stay Safe, Y'all!

 

Blown away, and Rockin'!

 

CB

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We had one in April of (I think) 2011. It wasn't very big. An F1. I was watching the reports on TV. I dozed off and all of a sudden I woke up and the thing was on top of us. It sucked up half of one of our sheds -

DSC_0010-1.jpgDSC_0037.jpg

 

Stuff blown all over the place - Roofing stuck in the trees -

DSC_0022-1.jpg

 

The root ball on this oak looks like it was nine feet across -

DSC_0042.jpg

 

It took me a couple of years to catch up on all the downed trees and stuff. I had to replace the roofs on both the house and the shop. Fences, gutters, siding, sheds.

 

I had designed my shop to take a 120 mph wind. And it still doesn't even creak or make any sounds of distress when the wind blows hard. [flapper]

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Best wishes to all impacted.

 

Dennis, from afar the U.S. has such an amazing array of climate extremes - extreme deserts, extreme cold, extreme humidity, etc..and and 'event' type weather/geological occurrences. I look forward to checking it out someday, quite fascinating comparison to our relatively stable conditions here in a similar sized country.

 

Is there anywhere in the U.S. that has reasonably stable conditions year round (excluding Alaska where I assume it's just cold)? Looking at the map I'd hazard a guess at West Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, and Kansas, but I really have no idea. An amazing country whichever way you look at it. [thumbup]

Florida has same weather year around except for the hurricanes

 

4H

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Tornado Alley is a term that is used to describe a wide swath of tornado prone areas between the Rocky Moutains and the Appalachian Mountains that frequently experience tornadoes. Tornado Alley map starts in central Texas and goes North through Oklahoma, central Kansas and Nebraska and Eastern South Dakota, sometimes dog legging East through Iowa, Missouri, Illinois and Indiana to western Ohio. According to the national climatic data center, Texas reports the highest number of Tornadoes of any state, although it's very large land mass accounts for that status. Kansas and Oklahoma are second and third when it comes to the number of Tornadoes reported, but those states report more Tornadoes per land area than Texas. While not as familiar as Tornado Alley, Dixie Alley generally refers to another part of the country that is likely to experience Tornadoes. Generally the upper Tennessee Valley and lower Mississippi Valley. Florida's almost daily thunderstorms spawn a large number of Tornadoes, however a small percentage of Florida's Tornadoes are considered high intensity. The U.S. Records about 1,000 Tornadoes a year with Canada ranking second at only 100 per year. According to the U.S. Weather bureau, Tornadoes have occurred in every hour of the day, every month of the year, and in every state. Most often they occur in May and June, between 4:00 and 7:00 pm. A bad one hit Council Bluffs, Iowa many years ago right by my mothers house. It missed her house but leveled the one next to her. The whole city was a big mess. Two of them hit Omaha Nebraska years back. We have pictures somewhere. We had to take down 6 trees on our property but fortunately that was our only damage.

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Late reply but yea these things suck, we ended up at the neighbor's basement that night.

 

I live in the very south of Nasvhille, hilly terrain, usually tornadoes steer to the north or the south to flatter land, like Smyrna, LaVergne or Murfreesboro to the south or Nashville downtown and Clarksville to the north. Still we must take precautions.

 

I do have a way to build a tornado shelter on the cheap based on how my house sits on a hill I just have not done it yet.

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It is most dangerous if they come after dark, or if they are "rain-wrapped" which means embedded within a heavy downpour. Either scenario is treacherous because you can't see them coming.

One thing many don't realize is they are anchored only at the top. The part on the ground can whip around like a garden hose on full blast. This is why they warn against attempting to outrun one.

The Supercells which spawn them can also be pushing a "Bowfront" where even straight-line winds can be dangerous along the entire band.

The other night when they were so bad, a lone cell a few miles west of me produced winds clocked at 100mph in a very compact area of about a 1/2 square mile.

 

April 7, 2006 I watched one out my front door. It was rain-wrapped and at first I could hear it but couldn't see it. When it became visible it appeared to be coming straight at my house!

I could see things swirling around it just out from the main body. I was home alone and immediately went to the basement and turned a heavy armchair over on top of me. A few seconds later I could hear stuff hitting my house.

I was lucky. Instead of coming at me it was moving across my view and growing. It had destroyed the store down the road. Nothing was left but the huge steel coolers & freezer which were bolted into the concrete slab floor.

There was a guy on a motorcycle who ran inside to warn everyone and if they hadn't gone to the basement they would have been killed. The house across the road was rolled over on its side. The man inside had suffered only a broken arm.

I found a car side-mirror in my front yard. The thuds I had heard were baseball sized hailstones. This was around 12:30 pm - luckily many folks were not in their destroyed or damaged homes.

 

It was later determined to be an F3 tornado with a path of 880 feet wide. It had passed within a thousand feet of our house. I learned that day that when they move Due East (most travel some variation of SW to NE) it means they are strengthening.

The tornado from that same cell lifted and landed a second time that day. Seven people in Hendersonville and Gallatin, Tennessee had not been as fortunate.

 

I have never before or since felt that level of fear and will be just fine if I never do again!

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