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Tuning an Electric Guitar

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So I got this Les Paul the other day.....Tuning it is driving me crazy. I use a Snark tuner and it works fine with my acoustic guitars. This Les Paul, the G string in tune but when I play a D chord, it sounds awful?? Not in tune?? Something is not right?? Understand that this is my first electric guitar....I noticed the bridge is adjustable, do I need to make adjustments??

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Might be worth checking the intonation, if you hold the G string at the 12th fret you should get a G on your tuner. If it's out the bridge needs adjustment.

 

 

Ian

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Hello!

 

Probably, the slot of that string is not cut deep enough. You are pushing it sharp when fretting the chord.

 

Fret the 3rd fret of that string. Measure the gap between the string and the first fret. It should be around 0.010".

 

Cheers... Bence

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Thanks for the feedback.....Did a quick test, doubt intonation...harmonics at 12th fret spot on. While playing a basic D chord, the G string....fretted should be an A and it is way sharp. Guess its a "nut" issue....as mentioned on a reply to this thread. I am going to change strings and do a bit more research to see if this is something I can resolve at home. Ironic, I thought an electric would be spot on, no environmental issues....just keep it in the case. Thanks again for the replies and look forward to chatting with the Gibson crowd!!

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Thanks for the feedback.....Did a quick test, doubt intonation...harmonics at 12th fret spot on.

 

Do yourself a favor and intonate your guitar using an open note and a fretted note at 12, or two fretted notes like a G at the 5th on the D followed by a G at the 17th on the D. An open note is basically a note fretted at the 0 and should be compared to another fretted note, not a harmonic. Harmonics start sharp and fall off over time, the longer the more they fall. Tricksy hobbitses.

 

rct

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Yep, GForce will solve the issue!

 

 

no it wont (not sure if this was sarcasm or a suggestion)

 

Chances are the problem is what Bence has already pointed out

 

the nut regulation is not right.

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Could it be just a bad core in your string or maybe you're use to having to fret really hard and now you don't have to. High quality guitar, great set-up = less effort to fret and play

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Could it be just a bad core in your string or maybe you're use to having to fret really hard and now you don't have to. High quality guitar, great set-up = less effort to fret and play

Hi Chuck and thanks to you and everyone else regarding my LP issue. Quite sure it is a "nut" issue. You bring up a point...been playing acoustics and I am new to this electric guitar stuff....I am going to put new strings on tomorrow and might look into a few swipes of sand-paper on the nut. Nothing radical...Kinda funny, with all my experience playing acoustics, I have never had this happen. It is surly a quick fix. Neck and action seem fine, strings feel like noodles compared to my Larrivee's. I will post some pics shortly.

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Yep... you've got good ears.

 

If you intonate the G string correctly...it will still be sharp because the frets are not true temperament. You could slightly tune an open G slightly flat as a compromise so that the D chord sound better.

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Use your tuner, and check not just the intonation at the 12th fret vs open, but ALL the frets.

 

If the nut is indeed cut too high for that string, it will reveal itself by the notes getting progressively sharper to a big degree as you get closer to the nut.

 

If you want to "test" this, do a capo on the first fret, and the notes should be the same or out by the same amount using the same "test".

 

Personally, I don't intonate to the nut. I check every note, and find the best average. The nuts are almost always likely to be out more often than the frets. If it's THAT far out it I address it.

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Not trying to be a jerk here, but if you're coming from acoustic to electric, then it is really easy to over grip your fretting hand. Check your hand pressure to make sure you're not pulling the string sharp. If so, you've got some work to do in adjusting your feel. One thing I've heard recommnded is using heavier gauge strings to help compensate during the transition. Just an idea, but again not trying to be a jerk. Good luck with it.

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I find I do a lot of acoustic work for choir,, when I finally get around to playing for me, I grab my Les Paul.

 

I find that I'm either mashing the strings to the fret board that pull the strings out of tune or I'm bending a string enough to pull it out of tune.

 

I find the LP is more touch sensitive that my other guitars.

 

 

 

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