Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Internet Good or Bad For Music Business


JayinLA

Recommended Posts

Ever since Metallica and the record industry dug their heels in against the coming tide of file sharing and internet copyright morality, recording artists of all levels were put on notice. It was appearant that something was happening that was going to change the game for good....or bad.

 

 

Someone such as myself, who is a starving artist can use (and believe me) will welcome any exposure for free whether I see any profit from it or not. The internet allows so many channels of exposure for creatives who are trying to find an audience or following for their art.

 

The super successful recording artists of the world have to be frustrated that their copyrighted music is being shared and played all over the place with no return financially.

 

So is it good or is it bad.

 

MY ANSWER: It certainly changed things. Getting signed to a record deal being a monicor or "making it" is no longer the key to success. Most record contracts are one record contracts and are not going to front you milions of dollars based on some A&R's gut instinct. However if you are a working band, and don't mind working (Performing and Recording) their is a wealth of bounty to be had out their even in this singles, ringtone market place.

 

The DIY music biz is thriving, and club music is great again. Juke joints and small venues are hot beds of talent and competition among local artists and their following. Some of our favorite bands and musicians of the past are taking to the road again as royalty checks are diminishing, which is great for the fans.

 

So, in essence it has become a consumer's market where if you want to make a buck, it is easier and "making it" is easier but does not garantee exotic cars and beach bungalos. More like a BMW sedan and a flat Downtown. Still not a bad way to make a living. It's easier than ever for working creatives to survive on their art, but much harder to get rich.

 

What are your thoughts on today's music biz?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great topic Jay, especially in light of some recent threads on this forum!!

 

Old model music business; internet = generally fatal or near fatal.

New model music business; one current paradigm = J Bieber who made it almost entirely through YouTube videos according to his manager. Possibly not the example many people would like!

 

An increasing number of people want to get music free. Bad for big recording artists whose income and royalties decline steeply.

But pop music (specifically) has always been about new trends and faces - the internet is really good for that; the near-instantaneous communication of today was a very far-off dream when I was young.

IMO pop music's future is back where it should be, in the hands and hearts of teenage girls as it was in the 50s and 60s. And the rest of it is far, far less controlled by big music cartels than it was.

Those big companies still have their CD reissue catalogs which should keep turning over for awhile yet. The future is ever unpredictable and (as always) NOW is the most interesting time.

As they say, just my 2 cents.......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm interested in seeing whether the cult of celebrity survives. I suspect it will; for quite a while anyway.

Obviously if it doesnt, the music business will suffer, but perhaps its about time it did.

 

There are always artists whose music we love, but most all plaudits are certainly OTT in my view. We are all people, with certain aptitude & talents.

 

All the guitarists we love from any period were certainly talented, but they were also hardworking and all of them were lucky. It could quite easily be a different bunch of musicians we remember if things had turned out just a little differently for them. Think about those others who couldve been successful in place of them.

 

We seem to be living in Warhol's predicted 15 minutes of fame period. But it feels strange and it doesnt fit our expectations.

No one is content to be part of an audience anymore. Everybody want to be on that stage. But with everybody up on stage, there is no one to watch & listen anymore.

 

If we can figure out how to live with it maybe the opportunities afforded by the internet will benefit us better in the long run.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good and bad.

 

It's good for those like yourself who are trying to get exposure... get their music out there.

 

But it's bad for music as a whole, in my estimation. With the dawn and take-over of digital downloads, there was a major element lost—if not severely diminished—in the world of music where the consumer is concerned…

 

When CD's came along, vinyl took a hit. The experience of "the album" was lost somewhat... with it being easier to skip over songs. I, myself, never did this. I treated the CD like the vinyl LP, only I didn't have it flip it over.

 

But then came the mp3, and the experience of having a physical connection to your music source (not to mention all the artwork and inserts, etc.) was gone. Downloading individual songs, never having to actually GO somewhere to get your music, not having something to hold in your hands, etc.,etc. Blech! I have not downloaded much music. I still will go out and buy a CD. Digital downloading is an empty musical acquisition experience.

 

It's all a matter of how you look at it, as well as your age and the generation you hail from.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The ballgame is most definitely new.

But I don't entirely blame the internet although it can take the majority of blame.

I believe the music business changed in the 80s when MTV and music videos started.

How you looked became more important than how you sounded. It was painful to watch the classic

bands of the 70s try to "fit in" with this new genre. Some did it with style, some sold out.

What the internet did was make it all free and has already been stated, forced bands out on the road

to make money as opposed to selling records.

 

"making it big" is still a lottery win just as it always was. Exposure has changed. I think for the worse.

The next talent is a mouse click away. Why dwell on the one I'm watching when there are a thousand more

lined up on the right side of the screen.

I give our local radio station credit for playing indie labels and promoting Canadian bands.

I hear a ton of great stuff when I'm driving. I only use the internet to research stuff I hear that I like.

I don't really use is it to find new stuff. But I do hear of new stuff on this forum on occasion that I really like.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In terms of bands producing original music, and using numbers purely as indicatives:

Same as before 90% of originals bands play as a hobby/passion and enjoy whatever gigs they can pick up for them I think its great as theres exposure to their songs via YouTube, Reverb Nation, Band Camp, etc. Many of these bands would never record and if they did would sell virtually no CDs anyway so its a great help to get people along to the gigs where they might make a little money and enjoy being seen in any case. I have loads of local bands live recordings on my MP3 and listening to them reminds me to check out who is playing, buy a T-shirt etc. I even listen to fellow forum members stuff on Sound Cloud quite regularly.

 

Same as before 9.9% of originals bands might get somewhere play on decent festival gigs, get paying club gigs, support tours to big acts, a commercially decent CD or 2… for them its also good. They were highly unlikely to get rich from playing, but they get extra exposure and help perpetuate whatever ongoing success within the aforementioned parameters they might enjoy.

 

Same as before 0.1% of originals bands get widely known and liked and have a shot at serious commercial success. This is where it gets trickier…for them its a bummer in that most wont be selling anything like the albums/CDs they might have once upon a time, but on the positive they now instantly have worldwide exposure available to them and the opportunity to use that to market their CD's, tours and merchandise that seems to be the main trade-off.

 

My 3c worth (the lousy exchange rate is hurting)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting conversation, with so many possible angles. I do believe that from a record companies point of view (and subsequently the artist)it's been a bad thing due to illegal downloads, however I think the companies themselves perpetuated it, at least in part because they were quick to jump on the download/iTunes bandwagon.

Going back even further it was much more difficult to copy and distribute a copy of music sold on vinyl than a download or CD. I think to some extent the record companies own greed has caused some of their problems.

You could also ask what TV has done for music, when the "products" of people like Simon Cowell dominate the charts, it's he who makes all the money from that not the artists.

 

 

Ian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know [unsure] ...The Internet, has been both a God send, and a curse, at the

same time. It's allowed instant global communication, exposure, and easy access to

almost everything! Is that good? Yes, and No! People spend their lives in front

of computers, on smart phones, and tablets, instead of actually having a face to face

conversations, anymore. That is (IMHO) not so good! They have everything at their

fingertips, but seem to lack, more and more, the real social skills, and responsibility

that goes with it. There's no, or little direct "consequence" to their actions. They

"hack" one another, and everything else, to get what they want, "legal" or otherwise.

 

The "Music Business" is merely one aspect, or "casualty!" And, patience levels, have

dropped, dramatically! So much is now "instant access," so entitlement and lack of

patience, flourish. It's very surface and image oriented, and misinformation (AKA Lying)

is rampant! Progress? Maybe, some might say definitely...In SOME ways. Being able to

do, or assist medical procedures/operations, from thousands of miles away, in critical,

life threatening situations, is a God Send! Having access to music, and art, from all

over the world, and any culture, is positive, interesting, and even inspiring! Those

kinds of things are all very positive! But, there is such a thing, as information (and

misinformation) overload, and a resulting social disconnect, as well. Which makes for a

"can't see the forest for the trees," syndrome. Cyber crime is a real, and global, threat!

As is cyber warfare. The Internet has been life altering, musically, and otherwise, no

doubt! And, as with most life altering things, both great and not so great, at the same

time.

 

But, the genie is out of the bottle now, and there's little to no going back. So..???

 

IMHO, as always.

 

CB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know [unsure] ...The Internet, has been both a God send, and a curse, at the same time.

It's allowed instant global communication, exposure, and easy access to almost everything!

Is that good? Yes, and No! People spend their lives in front of computers, on smart phones,

and tablets, instead of actually having a face to face conversations, anymore. That

is (IMHO) not so good! They have everything at their fingertips, but seem to lack,

more and more, the real social skills, and responsibility that goes with it. There's

no, or little direct "consequence" to their actions. They "hack" one another, and

everything else, to get what they want, "legal" or otherwise. The "Music Business"

is merely one aspect, or "casualty!" And, patience levels, have dropped, dramatically!

So much is now "instant access," so entitlement and lack of patience, flourish. It's

very surface and image oriented, and misinformation (AKA Lying) is rampant! Progress?

Maybe, some might say definitely...In SOME ways. Being able to do, or assist medical

procedures/operations, from thousands of miles away, in critical life threatening

situations, is a God Send! Those kinds of things are very positive! But, there is

such a thing, as information overload, and social disconnect, as well. Which makes

for a "can't see the forest for the trees," syndrome. Cyber crime is a real, and global,

threat! As is cyber warfare. The Internet has been life altering, no doubt! And,

as with most life altering things, both great and not so great, at the same time.

 

But, the genie is out of the bottle now, and there's little to no going back. So..???

 

IMHO, as always.

 

CB

 

 

Wow man. Yeah the internet as a big glass house is a much larger topic. I personally feel "Trojan Horsed" knowing that every damn thing has some creepy back door to spy and snoop. Not that I give a rats rip that some cheeto fingered *** knows that I like Emo lesbians or Black Chicks, but in general, it's almost like we're unconsciously building a prison for ourselves, and the few that see it, are relentlessly attacked.

 

But as for DIY creatives who are trying like hell to avoid getting a real job...it has some real value. I suppose everything has good and bad. Yen and Yang. In fact there could not be one without the other, right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry, Jay...for the (seeming) "rant." It wasn't, really. Just some observations.

The Internet is Great, in a lot of ways! Musically, and otherwise. [thumbup] But,

I DO worry, about all this "tech" stuff, and the negative aspects, as well. But,

I'm OLD, and know the difference, between the era's. Most younger folks, have never

really known, anything but the Internet, and the "tech" world. My era, and thinking,

is as foreign to them, as to be on Mars! LOL

 

CB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great topic Jay. I'm kind of an old timer I have not played in an organised group since the late 70's. Music sure has changed. In the old days before DJ's at weddings a person could make some extra cash playing at wedding receptions. As far as buying music I still have a huge album and 45 rpm collection. I also have a huge cd collection. I love to watch youtube and I listen and watch musicians on the internet daily. When I see hear a group or guitarist I really like, I buy their cd. I like to own the music I love to play over and over and I feel that the musician should be compensated for their work. For me it's much easier to figure out a song if I own the cd because my stereo sits next to my amps which makes replaying the song a cinch by hitting the replay button. A big problem is try going to a music store and asking for the latest Martin Taylor or Tommy Emmanuel cd. The sales clerk looks at you like your from Mars. So one has to go to their web sites to purchase their music. I'm sure they receive more per cd than if it was mass distributed. Good for them. I stumbled upon a jazz singer, Caecilie Norby, fron Denmark on Youtube and bought the cd from overseas. For those Forum member who have not listened to these to musicians, you should. IMHO they are both in the top 10 of guitarists in world today. They recently put out a cd together which I bought from Emmenual's website called the Colonel and the Governor. Sorry this post rambles. My point is if we don't purchase music we love to listen to, I believe we will lose a lot of great musicians because they will have to seek other ways to make a living.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wait, they got the internet on the computer now? [scared]

 

I do miss the old days of a waiting to hear a record release on the radio, and then waiting at the store to get your copy. There was a certain magic in holding that album in your hands, and getting home as quick as possible to listen to the whole thing.

 

As stated here, the good news is that you can get a lot more exposure with the internet. But with more bands making albums it's tough to stay alive in the music business today. Rush talked about how they probably wouldn't have made it today. They signed a multi-album deal in the 70s. When Caress of Steel flopped, they still had a deal to do another album. That album, 2112, saved them. With all the music on the internet, these deals are simply not there. So bands have less opportunities to find their groove.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...