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jswatson0917

Noob Needs Schooled

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This is simply not true. Many in forums had issues with some of the features, but the build and quality has never been in contest.

As an 2015 LP Classic owner I can say that wood selection, fit and finish is top notch.

 

But as someone that have spent years trying to find the right guitar I can only recommend you to try as many as possible.

If you are looking for a Les Paul-type guitar you should also play Epiphones. If you can't tell the difference the save that money for something else.

There are also lot's of other brands that make good guitars of the Les Paul type, like PRS, Hagström and more.

 

So get out there and play everything you can get yours grubby mitts on!

 

And when you get something really special in your hands, you will know. I promise.

 

 

Thanks I will take this into consideration

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I have tried this but to me most guitars feel the same and I can't pickup any major differences in tone between guitars. For example to two guitars I own the feel the same other than weight my strat is a couple pounds lighter and is much thinner in both the neck and body. The strat has a glossy neck and the other one has a satin finish. The other problem I have is I can play a few chords and scales but I don't really have any songs memorized to play to compare sound

 

Right. So are you inexperienced?

If so, are you expecting to use the guitar mainly for learning?

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Right. So are you inexperienced?

If so, are you expecting to use the guitar mainly for learning?

 

 

Essentially I guess you can say I am inexperienced. Can I stand in front of a crowd and have them go Whoa no, but I can link a few chords and pluck some strings and have something come out that might sound like music.

 

When is a guitar player not using a guitar for learning? With the exception of Pete Townsend going to town on his amplifiers with his guitar.

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Essentially I guess you can say I am inexperienced. Can I stand in front of a crowd and have them go Whoa no, but I can link a few chords and pluck some strings and have something come out that might sound like music.

 

When is a guitar player not using a guitar for learning? With the exception of Pete Townsend going to town on his amplifiers with his guitar.

 

Is that a serious question? [mellow]

 

If performing, most of the time players are consolidating what they know. That goes for improvising too.

Most of what you learn playing in front of people is what comes across & what doesn't. Hardly the same thing as learning how to play the guitar.

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Essentially I guess you can say I am inexperienced. Can I stand in front of a crowd and have them go Whoa no, but I can link a few chords and pluck some strings and have something come out that might sound like music.

 

When is a guitar player not using a guitar for learning? With the exception of Pete Townsend going to town on his amplifiers with his guitar.

 

I've been playing on and off for 44 years and I consider myself as "learning", and I don't know any of my guitar playing friend who would announce that they had finished learning.

 

 

Ian

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I've been playing on and off for 44 years and I consider myself as "learning", and I don't know any of my guitar playing friend who would announce that they had finished learning.

 

 

Ian

 

 

 

Quite so. That has not been disputed. I’ve been playing 46 years, and am also still learning.

 

I realise that ADHD appears endemic in busy forums (and that goes for me too BTW), but the question was:

“When is a guitar player not using a guitar for learning?” Now that may have been a rhetorical remark.

I really hope not, because I am only trying to help here. So out of respect, I choose to respond to the question literally.

 

We don’t learn every time we use a guitar.

 

When zoned out in front of the TV, I can practice scales for hours. Am I learning anything? No. I am just reinforcing muscle memory.

When laying down a rhythm track with a few chords. Am I learning then? No. I should be practice perfect before hitting that red button.

Am I learning during a classical recital? Of course not. I am emotionally engaged, not intellectually.

 

There are many examples.

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I don't know...I seem to "learn" something, even if by accident, whether I'm playing in a

determined fashion, or just "noodling" in front of the TV, as you say. I learn, too, by those

"accidents" or mistakes, when trying to improve, reinforce "muscle memory." I sometimes

stumble on licks or phrases, that I've always wondered about, by my accidental mistakes.

Of course, I'm totally "self-taught," and I'm sure I have a LOT of "bad habits," accordingly.

Maybe that's why, I "stumble" across those kinds of things. Don't know any better![flapper][tongue][biggrin]

 

CB

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I think it's the features of the 2015 most didn't like, but the quality and build were top-notch, I thought.

 

I think most who experienced them and even complained about the features feel this way.

 

i correct my earlier posts, my guitar is a 2015 and not 16. It did NOT have a gFoRce, but it did have that brass nut. I think that brass nut is making tuning difficult, but other than that its a very good guitar.

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Quite so. That has not been disputed. I've been playing 46 years, and am also still learning.

 

I realise that ADHD appears endemic in busy forums (and that goes for me too BTW), but the question was:

"When is a guitar player not using a guitar for learning?" Now that may have been a rhetorical remark.

I really hope not, because I am only trying to help here. So out of respect, I choose to respond to the question literally.

 

We don't learn every time we use a guitar.

 

When zoned out in front of the TV, I can practice scales for hours. Am I learning anything? No. I am just reinforcing muscle memory.

When laying down a rhythm track with a few chords. Am I learning then? No. I should be practice perfect before hitting that red button.

Am I learning during a classical recital? Of course not. I am emotionally engaged, not intellectually.

 

There are many examples.

 

that is very similar to what i meant when i said there is a big difference between playing guitar and practicing guitar.

practicing muscle memory is teaching your muscles to remember in a way you are learning. For me practicing a scale is all learning still simply because i do not know the notes all over the fretboard so if i learn tone tone semitone combinations by playing scales i am also learning the notes.

 

 

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Quite so. That has not been disputed. I’ve been playing 46 years, and am also still learning.

 

I realise that ADHD appears endemic in busy forums (and that goes for me too BTW), but the question was:

“When is a guitar player not using a guitar for learning?” Now that may have been a rhetorical remark.

I really hope not, because I am only trying to help here. So out of respect, I choose to respond to the question literally.

 

We don’t learn every time we use a guitar.

 

When zoned out in front of the TV, I can practice scales for hours. Am I learning anything? No. I am just reinforcing muscle memory.

When laying down a rhythm track with a few chords. Am I learning then? No. I should be practice perfect before hitting that red button.

Am I learning during a classical recital? Of course not. I am emotionally engaged, not intellectually.

 

There are many examples.

 

 

My question was more of a rhetorical remark since it is often said that musicians no matter how experienced are always learning

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If you have the adjustable brass nut and push/pull pots then you must have the HP version. I have the traditional model. I think by now they may have changed over to a different nut

 

HP?

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If you have the adjustable brass nut and push/pull pots then you must have the HP version. I have the traditional model. I think by now they may have changed over to a different nut

 

Im afraid you lost me on that, What do you mean HP version?

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My question was more of a rhetorical remark since it is often said that musicians no matter how experienced are always learning

 

Thanks for clearing that up. I'll butt out now.

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I think merciful-evans was asking if you're inexperienced because even for me as a 'rank amateur' can hear and feel the difference between guitars when I pick them up one after another in the store.

 

now listening on recordings that's a totally different story, but when you're looking for a guitar for yourself, you have to go to the store and try many out to find the one you like.

 

 

 

 

Essentially I guess you can say I am inexperienced. Can I stand in front of a crowd and have them go Whoa no, but I can link a few chords and pluck some strings and have something come out that might sound like music.

 

When is a guitar player not using a guitar for learning? With the exception of Pete Townsend going to town on his amplifiers with his guitar.

 

 

 

 

 

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I think merciful-evans was asking if you're inexperienced because even for me as a 'rank amateur' can hear and feel the difference between guitars when I pick them up one after another in the store.

 

now listening on recordings that's a totally different story, but when you're looking for a guitar for yourself, you have to go to the store and try many out to find the one you like.

 

Part of the problem is I don't plug in when I try out a guitar. I'd rather not showcase my axe skills in front of an unwilling audience. That is why I can't tell the difference.

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Part of the problem is I don't plug in when I try out a guitar. I'd rather not showcase my axe skills in front of an unwilling audience. That is why I can't tell the difference.

 

that is the best way to see if the guitar is good or not. ask for a silent area if you are seriously checking to buy, they might even let you use a students room or office to listen unplugged. Just keep in mind you should still get a pro to set it up and the action may not be how you will ultimately have it.

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Part of the problem is I don't plug in when I try out a guitar. I'd rather not showcase my axe skills in front of an unwilling audience. That is why I can't tell the difference.

 

Don't let that bother you, guitar players come in all shapes and sizes, good, bad and learning! The people in the shop have seen it all before and you can always turn the volume on the amp (don't just use the guitar's volume)so not many people can hear you.

If you can find a shop where you can trust the staff and talk to them all the better. Whatever you do particularly in your situation, don't rush to buy, play as many guitars as you can it'll give you a better idea of what you want. I suspect that you already have an idea of how you like a guitar to sound (from your favourite guitar players etc)and try to get a guitar that will give that sound but remember, a large part of how a guitar sounds is down to the amp that your playing it through, and that's before anyone throw's effects pedals into the mix.

Listen to some of the reviews by people like Andertons, there a little silly at times but quite good, and they do lots of them but again look out to see if they are using any pedals:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mS7FzAYc0rI

 

Most importantly enjoy looking and the very best of luck.

 

Ian

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I do that all the time in the store; that is play unplugged.. you can feel the neck radius, the neck/fret board easy to chord, do a chromatic scale from fret 1 to fret X (be that 21,22,24 frets) since some guitar's have compound radii and you may or may not like the neck

 

does the guitar balance well? (I have a Jim Adkins tele I bought used, gorgeous guitar, darn neck heavy)

 

you can also feel how the guitar vibrates acoustically (even if its a solid body guitar),

 

after that, then if you still like the guitar,, pick an amp and plug in

 

has nothing to do with 'showing the world your guitar skill'; one thing my wife does not understand is I use an amp for tone, not volume

 

if you turn the gain to 10 and add a fuzz-face to the signal.. you're not going to prove how the guitar sounds in my opinion

 

just trying to help out when you said you can't tell the difference guitars

 

Part of the problem is I don't plug in when I try out a guitar. I'd rather not showcase my axe skills in front of an unwilling audience. That is why I can't tell the difference.

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