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62burst

Just wrecked a set of DR Sunbeams

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The Sunbeams sat in the case pocket long enough for me to forget they were not the DR Rares that sound great, but seem to match Martin SP's in their short-lived nature. The Sunbeams were going to be perfect for the '49 LG-2 which was going out tonight to fill the need for a small guitar situation. . .

 

The "Taylor Method" of string installation makes for a fast string change, yields just the right number of wraps around the tuner post, and ensures that the diagonal cutters never get anywhere near the headstock:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uXEkDR_-D88

 

Yes, he just strung up that guitar in 2:52.

 

. . . DR Sunbeams have a round core with a flattened area on the end to keep the windings tensioned. If you cut the string before installation, as in the above method, the windings become loose on the string. To say that it causes the string to sound dead is an understatement. It might be better if this information was prominently mentioned on the outside of the string package, not buried in a page of text inside only visible if the packaging was torn apart, which is not necessary to remove the strings.

 

Oh well. 'Hope this helps someone else.

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Yup. Learned that a while back. Not sure how, but it was probably the hard way.

 

I like DR strings but every pack I've got in the last two years had corrosion on them. Doesn't affect them in any way but just looks bad. It is like one tiny spot repeated along the string in intervals, like it happened on the roll of raw material. I have Sunbeams on my 39 J-55 now and they sound great.

 

Rich

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Interesting stringing technique, with no locking turn on the string before you start to wrap. Obviously it works if you get enough post wraps.

 

Re the Sunbeams, I must have read somewhere not to cut them before they're tensioned. In practice, I don't cut any type of string until they're tensioned, so maybe I just got lucky.

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Been there, done that . Kind of one of those slow motion brain hiccup as you move in to clip-em, you know you shouldn't but it happens anyway. The loose brass winding unfurls, and along with it, your mind.

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Round core strings should have the message prominently displayed on the cover of the strings... WARNING! Do NOT cut these strings before winding them on the posts! DANGER DANGER WILL ROBINSON!

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Why would anyone cut strings before tensioning them ?

 

 

Well, you would if you followed the Taylor method. Which I don't.

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Question still stands , followed by 'what the hell is that video all about?'

 

That's just teaching people the wrong thing. Geez louise

 

Hey, it's that Taylor way. Who knows what their guitars would sound like if you strung'em properly? [rolleyes]

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Why would anyone cut strings before tensioning them ?

 

The only string I ever cut before tensioning is on a Fender with split tuners, you almost have to cut them first if you want to string the guitar correctly. Any other tuner, tension first, then cut.

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I finally learned to cut the string AFTER I first tuned it. It's easy to ruin strings. I imagine we've all wasted a few sets throughout the years. Years ago I was always breaking them when I first put them on because I'd tighten them too much. I'd be searching for the note when I'd already passed it.

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quote name='blindboygrunt' timestamp='1459631579' post='1757645']

Why would anyone cut strings

 

As stated in the o.p., that method gets a nice minimal amount of string winding on the tuner post, and the cutters, & their resultant recoil, never get/happen anywhere near the the headstock.

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Well , I get that part of it . It's very fast , which I suppose has its own impressiveness .

I just think about that video being online forever ,some kid or novice gets a guitar and needs to know how to change strings and watches that. It looks clever , and it's the 'Taylor method' so hey that must be the way to do it . And it is a way of doing it , but at the same time it's not.

 

You can pour a pint of Guinness in one go , and that faster and only handling the glass reduces the chance of dropping it , but it's not right .

 

Maybe I'm wrong , maybe this is the definitive way to change strings. Maybe it makes no difference at all . I'm not some fuddy duddy who thinks everything has one way of being done .

But if someone asked me to show them how to change strings I wouldn't be showing them this . It's not formula 1 .

 

I hope you get where I'm coming from. It all just seems very production line and not much bonding with an instrument going on .

 

But hey , who am I . A guy can change his strings with his feet if it makes him happy

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Yes. It also helps orient the ball end properly, if you do it the same way every time.

 

Yup, I've always done it that way....

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I usually wrap my string before I thread it. That way I know how many I'll get on my acoustics. Most of my electrics have string locks so there are few if any wraps.

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For me, there was a growing appreciation for those who could restring a guitar, and not get some combination of a wire bird's nest or some honeydripper look on the tuner post. Even if the string was pre-wound a bit, by the time it was up to tension/tune, there were too many windings on the post. The Taylor method eliminates that, and the time savings is just a fringe benefit. Helpful if you like to do multiple string changes at one time for a/b'ing multiple guitars or string sets on a level playing field (strings of the same install date).

 

Especially appreciated for a simple, clean look;

 

Screen%20Shot%202016-04-03%20at%201.33.55%20PM_zpss6hh0jvo.png

 

. . . or if you can't easily wrap around a tuner post:

 

Screen%20Shot%202015-10-24%20at%209.54.50%20PM_zpsfdanspgn.png

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Why would anyone cut strings before tensioning them ?

It's typical when restringing guitars or basses with their tuner capstans slotted and featuring a centre hole.

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I actually find changing strings sort of, therapeutical in a way. I enjoy the process and take my tine.

 

However the Taylor method could be useful if you pop a string at a gig and need to make a fast change.

 

However ive had a chance to learn early about never cutting round core before fully wound, especially given i use Pyramids and Subeams on 90% of my guitars, both round core strings.

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The Taylor method works ok, unless you happen to be watching a spring training baseball game at the time and only half paying attention to the restringing. In that case, you may stretch the A string to the A post thinking it is the E string. Oops! My A string only has about one wrap around the post. Let's go Bucs!

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Not a fan of the Taylor method. I do use my drill to actually do the windings too, but if you cut it first you can't lock the string on itself.

 

bobsmethod.jpg

 

 

That's pretty much what I do. Strings never slip.

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