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Gibson wood source?

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And one of my faves.. A Zebrawood top... (which would be appropriate to you given your user name :))

gi80218_zpsunfk8uhe.jpg

 

And yes.. I think the same... They should use some alternate woods rather than trying to fix things that arnt broke or adding technology.

 

 

Pretty Cool, had to bump it up. [biggrin]

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There's no reason to keep using wood so far as I'm concerned.

 

Earlier this morning there was a old 1936 bakelite Rickenbacker on ebay uk. (about £850, -it didnt sell)

 

These days we have so many excellent materials to choose from, but for some reason we still stick with wood.

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Guest Farnsbarns

There's no reason to keep using wood so far as I'm concerned.

 

Earlier this morning there was a old 1936 bakelite Rickenbacker on ebay uk. (about £850, -it didnt sell)

 

These days we have so many excellent materials to choose from, but for some reason we still stick with wood.

 

Using wood is the green approach though. Grow a tree which locks up carbon from c02 while releasing the 02. Cut it down and build things, the carbon remains in the wood. Grow more wood and repeat. The more times the cycle repeats the better. The problem lies when you use rare or endangered wood but the extinction of species and the avoidance thereof is conservation not necessarily ecological in an environmental sense.

 

The same goes for recycling paper which is not ecologically sound in the least (if you believe that c02 is a problem that is).

 

The real goal, to my mind, is permaculture where most of our actions are sustainable. The use of wood is highly sustainable as long as it's wood which will grow in a wide range of environments, quickly and sustainably. Maple, for example.

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Using wood is the green approach though. Grow a tree which locks up carbon from c02 while releasing the 02. Cut it down and build things, the carbon remains in the wood. Grow more wood and repeat. The more times the cycle repeats the better. The problem lies when you use rare or endangered wood but the extinction of species and the avoidance thereof is conservation not necessarily ecological in an environmental sense.

 

The same goes for recycling paper which is not ecologically sound in the least (if you believe that c02 is a problem that is).

 

The real goal, to my mind, is permaculture where most of our actions are sustainable. The use of wood is highly sustainable as long as it's wood which will grow in a wide range of environments, quickly and sustainably. Maple, for example.

 

I agree. I've lusted after one of these for many years now and might be ownin one later this year.

 

SWOMGT, Sustainable Wood Orchestra Model Gloss Top:

 

M1861285-front-large.jpg

 

rct

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k, I don't have any of that, I don't like patio furniture.

 

Really? So Aaron at Guitar Center will what? Scratch his neck tat and what? Go find out about fair trade wages and how eco friendly this here Martin is? Is that what is going to happen?

 

Ok. Well, good luck with that.

 

rct

 

Thanks for the good luck wishes, rct.

 

But you did ask the question. And I merely answered on ways to achieve what you asked for. Then it's entirely up to you if you want to go through with them.

 

not sure if I agree 100% with you on that... But I do think it's important to know where the wood is coming from. However, as someone who works at a store I know that we don't really get schooled on where the woods come from, or fairly the workers get paid. And even if I decided to investigate, I don't really have time for that, there are so many important duties when it comes to running stores that it falls pretty far down on my list of things

 

I work in retail too, and I can assure you that I don't know the source materials on all the products in the store. And it's true that it's up to your employer to supply you with these answers. But you can also ask the question.

It is also true that these questions doesn't really apply easily to all types of businesses.

 

But I think it's easy to apply it to food. Like, where is this tomato from? How much emissions from it's transport? Was lots of pesticides used in it's production. Was the workers on the farm payed fair wages for their job?

In the end, if I want cheap tomatoes, that's what I'll get. But if I want a really good tomato? What will need to happen?

 

Less pesticides generally means smaller harvest, fair wages usually means more expensive overhead which all adds to the cost of the tomato.

 

I remember seeing an episode on Chef's Table on Netflix where Dan Barber who runs BlueHill restaurant in NYC talked a lot about that as a business modell. Have look to hear more. He has many interesting views.

 

Also, sorry for going slightly off topic, but it feels like this is a thread about sustainability. I'm sure we all don't want the rainforest destroyed to we can get our LP fix.

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