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Forearm Haze on Sunburst J-45


BigDawg007

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Virtuoso Polish . . . and if it's really stubborn, Virtuoso Cleaner. If it's built up over time it might take a coupla applications of the cleaner.

 

I got tired of cleaning it so these days I use a forearm sleeve with a short sleeved shirt.

 

 

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Geez guys. How do you think those old, vintage, highly-sought guitars get that wonderful wear and patina on them? From being played, not babied! Sure, keep it from getting gouged and broken but enjoy the life you put on your instrument over the years! It's a tool, not a museum piece! Play it!

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Geez guys. How do you think those old, vintage, highly-sought guitars get that wonderful wear and patina on them? From being played, not babied! Sure, keep it from getting gouged and broken but enjoy the life you put on your instrument over the years! It's a tool, not a museum piece! Play it!

 

 

Exactly !

 

Only thing is , when it gets hazy it sticks to your arm skin like a ***** .

 

But it'll eventually harden up and give no more jip

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Virtuoso is good stuff. I've also heard that naptha (lighter fluid, like rosonol) works well and does not damage the finish, but haven't tried it. Each time I play, before I put my guitar away I give it a quick wipe with a soft rag. I hit the strings, the back of the neck, and that spot on the lower bout. It seems to really reduce the accumulation of haze/gunk/etc.

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I am getting a forearm haze on the right side of my J-45 front top. You guys got any recommendations on a recommended varnish or polish that can remove it? Without ruining the front top?

 

Thanks.

I got the same thing the very first time I played my new J-165. I tried a few different standard guitar polishes (Martin, Dunlop Formula 65) and they didn't do anything. I ended up playing it while wearing a long sleeve shirt (winter) or just put a small cloth under my arm where it touched the guitar (really annoying). I don't think its gunk that can be cleaned off or that it ever gets better. I think your skin chemistry can react with the nitro finish and permanently change it. The guitar tech at the place I bought pretty much said the same thing. Personally, in spite of my own ridiculous behavior, I like Buc's answer the best - It's a tool, not a museum piece! Play it!

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Far be it from me to tell anyone anything about acoustic guitars, because they are all so different and just so special, but haze that you can't write your initials in, like on a window in winter? If you can't effect that haze with your finger, it is the heat of your arm warming up moisture trapped under the clear coat on your Unobtanium top, causing it to condense, just like on the aforementioned window. Fender made a whole bunch of electrical type guitars that were pretty famous for doing this when I was a kid, I still run into one once in a while. Their case was slightly different in that the clear coat on top actually held it in, and it would lift the paint right off eventually. Most spensive coustics have lacquer that I believe will transpire that condensation, appearing to do so as a result of painstaking polishing when in reality, just put it away it'll be fine.

 

Just a tip, and as always, I could be wrong. Party on Acoustidudes.

 

rct

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When I bought my J-45, which was and is my first expensive guitar, I spent so much time wipin' it clean everyday from haze, fingerprints snd all. After a while, I just stopped doing it snd spend this time playing a little more. Long sleeve is this only effort I do anymore!

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It's a tool, not a museum piece!

 

Most folks of average means wouldn't spend a two or three thousand dollars on an instrument and not take resonable care of it. Wipe it down after use and clean it up once or twice a year. Questions about forearm haze and such are completely understandable and IMO the OP has a legitimate question. Of course there's stories - like the guys at Elderly exhibiting crap they've pulled out of the bodies of acoustic guitars - hilarious. And then there's Trigger. . B)

 

 

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I had the same problem with my bird. However, I found a solution that worked for me. I took a 100% cotton t shirt and doubled it over, wrapped it very tightly around my index finger and middle finger. Slightly dampened it, then applied a VERY small dab of music monad guitar wax to the cloth. I then applied it to the area with a little pressure and went in small circular motions.work on a small area at a time. Repeat the procedure until the entire area is back to normal. You may have to work on the same place numerous times. I remembered this from spit shining my boots in the military. Since, I apply Gibson pump polish weekly ( I play everyday at home now). When my boy or buddy picks it up without a sleeve on, no problems anymore. Just wipe it down every time after playing. Sure, it may be a little time consuming to get the haze off, but it was well worth it to me. It took me longer than that to save up for it. I've also kept in mind, there can be 100 birds in the same with you, but there is only 1 of a kind and will never be another exactly the same as mine. Hope this helps.

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I've never been good at cleaning my guitars. Maybe once-a-year if I think of it. If it gets wet or I've played in a dusty/dirty area, I'll wipe it off. I wear long sleeves when it's cold and short when it's warm, so I guess they're protected at least part of the time. I agree with what Buck is saying and I also see the other side of this. I don't necessarily want a sweat stain or mark on my guitars, but I guess it could happen. I should probably wipe them off more often than I do. On the "up" side of not regularly wiping-off my guitars is that if one gets stolen, it's likely got my DNA all over it. [thumbup] Of course, if the thief is also a "clean freak" he'll likely clean the guitar. [cursing] ....In general, it's probably best if we wipe our guitars off at least every few months and at the same time use the hell out of them. I've got a couple spray bottles of the Gibson stuff. I'll try to start using them more than I have.

'

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Geez guys. How do you think those old, vintage, highly-sought guitars get that wonderful wear and patina on them? From being played, not babied! Sure, keep it from getting gouged and broken but enjoy the life you put on your instrument over the years! It's a tool, not a museum piece! Play it!

 

It takes me, at most, 10 seconds to wipe down the guitar. I think "baby it" vs. "play it" is a false dichotomy in the context we're discussing here.

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Playing in high humidity conditions is a total pain in the butt unless you happen to be one of those lucky abberations who doesn't sweat. I've met a few and don't trust 'em. Long sleeves are good, except when the sleeve gets soaked all it does is hold moisture which leaves haze anyway. The worst enemy is insect repellent, which will eat the finish in disgusting fashion. Vinyl-backed guitar straps will dissolve finish. I'd bet nearly everyone on the forum could contribute at least one item to the list of guitar finish predators and there'd still be a few undocumented ones out there just waiting to defile our most prized axes. My belief is that, as adults, we are suffering punishment for leaving rings on the table tops of generations of mothers when we were young and indifferent to the damage we left in our collective paths.

 

When polish of one's choice no longer keeps the scar to a cosmetic minimum, my suggestion is taking the blemished instrument to the luthier - a brief professionally applied contact with his buffing wheel generally resolves the issue until we manage to begin the process all over once again.

 

On an unrelated note: if a goat should decide to bathe the surface of your guitar case, don't interfere - there's something in their saliva that makes the case repel dust for an interval of at least 6 years. Check with me a year from now and we'll see if the treatment is good for 7. Yep, there's a story behind that one!

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I really don't like the forearm haze. I can't get rid of it either but have improved it with virtuoso.

I understand about them not being able to stay new, but I still try to keep them that way, while still playing the hell out of them. Not a road worn kinda guy here.

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Most folks of average means wouldn't spend a two or three thousand dollars on an instrument and not take resonable care of it. Wipe it down after use and clean it up once or twice a year. Questions about forearm haze and such are completely understandable and IMO the OP has a legitimate question. Of course there's stories - like the guys at Elderly exhibiting crap they've pulled out of the bodies of acoustic guitars - hilarious. And then there's Trigger. . B)

 

 

.

The 'vintage tone balls' make me laugh every time I pass thru Elderly....

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Geez guys. How do you think those old, vintage, highly-sought guitars get that wonderful wear and patina on them? From being played, not babied! Sure, keep it from getting gouged and broken but enjoy the life you put on your instrument over the years! It's a tool, not a museum piece! Play it!

I pretty much agree with you here, although I can see the other viewpoint to a degree. The first bought-new, expensive guitar can feel like a major responsibility. The way it went with me was that the owner matured along with the guitar and tolerance for normal wear became kind of mutual thing. Anyhow, something usually comes along to separate the players from the furniture buyers....

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Martin Guitar Polish is, in fact, furniture polish.

Lemon Oil - good for raw wood fingerboard and bridges, very bad for nitrocellulose.

Use of 'abrasive' rubbing compounds can take off some of the nitro along with the gunk.

Maguire's Clear Coat Polishing (NOT Rubbing) Compound (for cars) and similar products designed to remove 'swirls' can be used in moderation to minimize the appearance of small scratches.

I've never heard a bad thing about Virtuoso Polish, but I use the Orange Label Gibson Pump Polish. Because I'm addicted to the smell.

Of course, Buc M is right. We need to treat our J45s as instruments and not museum pieces. Keeping 'em clean and shiny is treating it like an instrument. Wearing special clothing and sending your guitar to a restoration specialist for sweaty gunk, not so much. A clue - if you keep your guitar in a hermetically sealed glass display case in a room with a deadbolt and you keep the only key around your neck - it might be a museum piece that happens to look like a guitar!

The best advice I've gotten here on finish care,was to simply wipe off your guitar with a very slightly damp cloth once every month or so.

YMMV.

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My belief is that, as adults, we are suffering punishment for leaving rings on the table tops of generations of mothers when we were young and indifferent to the damage we left in our collective paths.

 

 

 

 

[biggrin]

 

Oh Oh!

 

 

Don't forget the Guitar Fairies lie in wait for the especially fastidious! They have 3 names each including the same names as the Dwarves....but can swing between Happy and Grumpy at the sight of overdone Vituoso polishing! True! What stops their rumbling is to wipe the guitar after every play with a white 100% cotton t-shirt lightly over the body and strings and then a quick little bit of your hot breath on the problem area (like wiping your reading glasses).

 

The darker J45 sunbursts show the marks more than a natural look top, depending on lighting and angle.

 

 

BluesKing777.

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After trying guitar polish I have found the best solution - A very damp chamois leather keeps the area clean then I just finish with a clean soft cloth . The guitars nearly a year old now and I am just going to let mine age gracefully. The biggest problem I have I not knowing when the battery is going to give up the ghost when plugged in , do they really last 1,000 hours as quoted by LR Baggs Thanks

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