Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

gibson j45/ hummingbird differences


Desolationrow

Recommended Posts

Where to start!

 

The Birds are THE strummer's guitar. Think Hillbilly Stones. Warmth and sweetness make up for the "lack of volume" relative to a Martin dread.

 

The J45 is an SUV... fingerpick, fingerstyle, strum - all the whilst balanced throughout. The Birds have a jangle, and while they certainly are fingerpicked as well (ask Em7), they just want a 1st position chord from you. They beg for it.

 

If you have the means, I would own both. I would not trade a J45 for it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Where to start!

 

The Birds are THE strummer's guitar. Think Hillbilly Stones. Warmth and sweetness make up for the "lack of volume" relative to a Martin dread.

 

The J45 is an SUV... fingerpick, fingerstyle, strum - all the whilst balanced throughout. The Birds have a jangle, and while they certainly are fingerpicked as well (ask Em7), they just want a 1st position chord from you. They beg for it.

 

If you have the means, I would own both. I would not trade a J45 for it.

Thanks for your answer! Also i went tô the shop and i play a Martin d35 (ôther famous "songwriter"guitar) perhaps a rosewood guitar is good option? Thanks again

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for your answer! Also i went tô the shop and i play a Martin d35 (ôther famous "songwriter"guitar) perhaps a rosewood guitar is good option? Thanks again

 

I have a D35 and a Bird (actually I gave the Bird away). There is something to be said for owning a Hog Gibson and a Rosewood Martin Dread. I love my D35, but if I ever had to thin the herd, it would go before my Gibsons I think.

 

Back to the Bird... this video sold me (its actually a Sheryl Crow Country Western, which is a blingless Bird. Sweetwater has a Country Western in stock too FYI (http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/SSCWANNH?adpos=1o1&creative=105744828601&device=c&matchtype=b&network=g&gclid=COXJxJqzxcwCFRNahgodnOAFXw)

 

This guitar sounds little like a D35, so play them both and let your ears decide!

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ea5wuoMQyA8

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have only played one Hummingbird and can't remember much since it was a while back, and my skills were very crude at that time (only slightly better now).

 

I have always wondered how the Birds are with palm muted bass string "oomph". If I want to play something Neil Youngish, the palm muted tone is important and has to work with a capo up a couple of frets.

 

Lars

Link to comment
Share on other sites

45 or Bird, , , we know they are both short scaled mahogany creatures, so it's up to the shoulders and the looks, , , , , , and the rest - which is 2 different identities and auras. Both can be strummed - both can be picked, but if you primarily strum maybe the Hummingbird calls your name. Seems you answer by being in love - which is a major factor in this situation. Everything points toward the Bird - but I would wait 2 or 3 weeks and go out and try a bunch, , , including some rose models.

Simply play the things you usually play and see what feels right - in your hands, , , and in your heart.

 

Have a happy spring

 

 

 

@Lars68 - I think the it gets pretty snappy and actually rocks when doin' that - still the Bird wouldn't be my first choice when playing Young. Yes, for some songs it will work fine - Long May You Run fx, , , where others especially dropped-D-stuff demands - or should we just say like - that bigger rose-box'n'bass. (eehh, just realized I play Long May U Run in dropped D, but rather gently travis-picked)

 

Rule is of course that there're no rules - and Neil would be the first to subscribe, , , , , to a certain degree. .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...