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carranoj25

Problem Changing Strings

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Hello everyone,

 

Went to change the strings on my SG this evening and did (believe I did) everything properly. However, there is buzzing all over and it even feels like the action is lower. I tried using the Tune-o-Matic bridge with screws facing the bottom and then tried the top. Do I just need to bring it in for another setup? I did not change string gauge or try to tune differently. Any info. is greatly appreciated!

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Guessing you moved the bridge adjustment posts. Slack the string tension and twist the posts counter-clockwise. Try a full revolution on each post and then re-tune. Repeat until it plays without buzzing. This should get it playable. Then get a basic set-up kit from Stew-Mac. It will help you set your own guitar up and save you lots of money over the years.

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Guessing you moved the bridge adjustment posts. Slack the string tension and twist the posts counter-clockwise. Try a full revolution on each post and then re-tune. Repeat until it plays without buzzing. This should get it playable. Then get a basic set-up kit from Stew-Mac. It will help you set your own guitar up and save you lots of money over the years.

 

The bridge adjustment posts being the two objects that hold the tune-o-matic in place? One on each side?

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The bridge adjustment posts being the two objects that hold the tune-o-matic in place? One on each side?

 

Yes - the tune-o-matic sits upon them.

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Weird, other than what Surf suggested I can't imagine what else it would be.

Just curious how those would even get touched during a string change.

Makes no sense to my small mind.

I'm sure more intelligent folk can help you out. I'm no help. Sorry bro. Lol

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Cool, thanks but just to be completely sure, we are talking about the thumbwheels in the below picture?

 

http://www.epiphone.com/News-Features/News/2011/Understanding-The-Epiphone-LockTone-Stopbar-Tune-o.aspx

 

Same thing right? How much should I slack the string?

 

Those are the ones. Just slack the string enough to remove most of the tension on the bridge. That will allow you to turn the thumb screws and raise the bridge. The screws move easily with no tension on the bridge, which is probably what happened when you changed the strings. I notice mine wanting to wander during string changes too.

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Those are the ones. Just slack the string enough to remove most of the tension on the bridge. That will allow you to turn the thumb screws and raise the bridge. The screws move easily with no tension on the bridge, which is probably what happened when you changed the strings. I notice mine wanting to wander during string changes too.

 

Weird.

OK, So I've played guitar since I was a kid. I'm kinda old now. Yes I took 20 years off playing but.

My first bridge like this that I can remember was in the early 80s. Had an ole LP Custom. I do change my strings one at a time. Never take them all off.

But I have never ever had a problem with the thumb wheels turning. Even when I have taken off all the strings

to clean the fret board. Which is pretty rare for my lazy a$$. I have never had a problem with the thumb wheel turning to the point where I saw any fret buzz.

Crazy man,, crazy.

Good luck with it. Curious to hear what this was.

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Learn something new every day! Thanks guys. I thought it got the buzz out but didn't know abought the sustain and such. When I changed strings on my sons guitar back, the whole guitar fell apart. Lol. Thought man! Every nut and bolt was so lose. And I had to re tighten everything. All the tunning keys were so wobbly. When I got it back together I had to play with the bridge settings till it finally sounded right. That was my learning guitar since it was a very cheap Vendetta. Now I'd like to buy it from him since it has a very deep bass sound. I have to admit, when I took the strings all off to work on it, the entire bridge and tail pieces fell right off too. That stumped me putting it all back together.

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when I took the strings all off to work on it, the entire bridge and tail pieces fell right off too.

 

 

Ya man, I think we all make that mistake once. Hopefully only once.

 

This coming from a man who had 2 propane tanks so he would never run out of gas.

I have to admit that in my lifetime I not only ran out once but twice since owning 2 propane bbq tanks.

I have since switched to natural gas on my bbq.

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1463978123[/url]' post='1771839']

Ya man, I think we all make that mistake once. Hopefully only once.

 

This coming from a man who had 2 propane tanks so he would never run out of gas.

I have to admit that in my lifetime I not only ran out once but twice since owning 2 propane bbq tanks.

I have since switched to natural gas on my bbq.

 

msp_thumbup.gif Yeah, I get tired changing the tanks out too and have two. That's a great idea though! I thought about going back to charcoal but remember it puts a funny taste in the meat.

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did you remove all the strings, and maybe do a clean up while the strings were off?

 

it does sound like once all the strings were off, the bridge was lowered inadvertently.

 

Once all the strings are off, the thumb wheels that adjust the bride move very easily.

 

a few things to do

 

one, measure your action, and record it, so you know where the strings ride at the 12th fret when it's setup how you want it.

(talking about gap between bottom of each e string to top of fret) Once you know what that is, you can easily restore it if it moves. you will need a precision ruler that has small measurements.

eg 64s of an inch or mm.

 

option 2, leave the two E strings on when you change and do maintenance, but detune the E strings enough to move them out of the nut ****, and let them rest on the side of the neck, leave enough tension so there is some down pressure on the bridge while you're doing any maintenance. this will help, but they will still move easily. (Measuring your action is the best way)

 

Those that say taking all the strings off ruins the setup but this is hogwash, it's almost always cockpit error, and they've moved the bridge adjustment posts somehow.

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Well I had not changed my strings in awhile on my Sg and knew it was time. But I was foolish and took them all off at once. While I was cleaning my guitar both my tailpiece and tune-o-metic bridge fell off as I moved the guitar around. So Im guessing the tuneomatic bridge had some pieces move around and I am going to try what Surfpup told me to do. But moving forward, changing one string at a time means "Take the low E off, put the low E on but don't tighten it all the way. Then do the same for the A,D,G,B,E?"

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Nice, glad that it worked.

 

I always take off all the strings, but I have a locking bridge and tailpiece, that would be the fancy solution.

 

But if you wan't to take them all off just lock them in place, with rubber bands for example.

I think rct mentioned it once, tried it on my Epi and it worked pretty well!

 

Some say it's not good to take them all off.

That it will mess up your intonation and truss rod adjustment etc....

 

I always do it that way and never had a problem.

The string tension is away only for a few minuts, nothing a healthy guitar neck couldn't take.

And I can't imagine a tech backstage changing strings one after another, it just takes too long.

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I always replace the strings one at a time so there is no change of the thumb screws moving or throwing the intention or truss rode adjustment out. I clean the fret board under each string as I change them as well if needed...

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... But moving forward, changing one string at a time means "Take the low E off, put the low E on but don't tighten it all the way. Then do the same for the A,D,G,B,E?"

It means replacing the strings one by one starting at tuning pitch of each old one and ending at tuning pitch with each new one before changing the next. This is the best way of doing regardless of guitar build. (By the way, this is valid even more for bowed instruments.)

 

 

...

I always take off all the strings, ...

 

Some say it's not good to take them all off.

That it will mess up your intonation and truss rod adjustment etc....

 

I always do it that way and never had a problem.

The string tension is away only for a few minuts, nothing a healthy guitar neck couldn't take.

And I can't imagine a tech backstage changing strings one after another, it just takes too long.

Changing strings one by one is the fastest and securest procedure, in particular if instant playability of the guitar is a concern.

 

Being some minutes with no string tension is not a basic problem for a decent guitar, but it may take too much time until tuning stability will be back at a level allowing to play the instrument on stage.

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I think rct mentioned it once, tried it on my Epi and it worked pretty well!

 

I use cork under the wheels, punch a whole in little knick-knack pads. Works for how inaccurately high I like the strings.

 

Take them all off, nobody ever died from it and no guitar ever broke from having all the strings off.

 

rct

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As far as keeping the thumbwheels correctly positioned I simply drew a fine arrow pointing forward on each wheel with a fine Sharpie.

If either (or both) slips a bit it's instantly obvious and re-setting hardly takes a second.

 

Pip.

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I sometimes remove all the strings, and other times change 1 or 2 at a time. No rhyme or reason.

 

But. The same thing as the OP happened to me last time I changed strings on my Goldtop. All these years changing strings and it's never happened to me until then. I don't remember touching the thumb wheels, but somehow they lowered. So it does happen. :)

 

BTW. Last time I was in a craft store with my wife I looked for those cork things that rct is talking about. I was going to try his trick. But A.C. Moore didn't have them.

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1464004947[/url]' post='1771905']

I always replace the strings one at a time so there is no change of the thumb screws moving or throwing the intention or truss rode adjustment out. I clean the fret board under each string as I change them as well if needed...

That's the way I did it to for years. Now I do two at a time since I'm using Pure Blues DR strings in Pure Nickel and they come two each in 3 packages. I get enough tension on them and cut two more strings.

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Those of you that have trad archtop (floating bridge) will know that when you remove the strings, the bridge falls off. The tailpiece will also likely come adrift from the strap pin.

A pencil mark at the correct bridge position saves a lot of intonation correction later.

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Cool, thanks but just to be completely sure, we are talking about the thumbwheels in the below picture?

 

http://www.epiphone.com/News-Features/News/2011/Understanding-The-Epiphone-LockTone-Stopbar-Tune-o.aspx

 

Same thing right? How much should I slack the string?

 

I was impressed with the scientific (but simple) explanation of the sustain improvement on the bridge re-design (LockTone) in carrano's link. Its a refreshing change from the customary mumbo jumbo.

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I use cork under the wheels, punch a whole in little knick-knack pads. Works for how inaccurately high I like the strings.

 

Take them all off, nobody ever died from it and no guitar ever broke from having all the strings off.

 

rct

 

Oh it was cork!

But where did I read that rubber band stuff? Must have sounded rct-ish to me, sorry my bad.

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