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Official HUMMINGBIRD owners thread!

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God, wherever he or she is, whatever form he or she takes, damn you for showing me that. It burnses, oh how it burnses.

rct

 

Easy there, Smeagle. Easy.

 

But that picture should be banned. Every time I look at it it just looks more and more, well, precious. Precious. MY PRECIOUS!!!!!!

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God, wherever he or she is, whatever form he or she takes, damn you for showing me that. It burnses, oh how it burnses.

 

rct

 

 

Easy there, Smeagle. Easy.

 

But that picture should be banned. Every time I look at it it just looks more and more, well, precious. Precious. MY PRECIOUS!!!!!!

 

One Bird to rule them all.

 

 

Rdnzl, that photo is growing on me.

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All true except that a maple Hummingbird is definitely NOT a Dove in different trim. The different scale lengths really seem to make a difference. 24.75" or 25.5" scale length, is almost as big a difference as mahogany vs maple.

 

Jesse, for as long as I can remember, players talk about the ease of playing a short scale guitar compared to regular scale. I must have something wrong with me since I can honestly say I can't feel a difference when I switch from one of my short scale to regular scale guitars. My 185 plays the same to me as my 150.....go figure. [confused]

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Get the one you prefer, tone wise... But if it were me i'd prolly go for the 2016 hummy... The new models are so light weight, they are very good and the hummingbird is supposed to be hog back and sides, but it's true that quilted one looks awesome.

Still, quilted is mapple, not hog.

 

I think this is quilted hummingbird, not 100% sure though :

Yes, it is.

 

I prefer this video, as he doesn't have half his boobie out.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3-tT-B0qOys

One can also find videos of him playing the standard Hummingbird to compare, and maybe even the Vintage. I'm not sure any of the videos quite capture how the maple sounds to the player. It sounded much warmer to me, but it did have dead strings when I played it. I don't feel like it loses any of the warmth but at the same time gets some oomph. The Vintage goes a different direction to get the same effect of more oomph and even more warmth.

 

Are the 2016s lighter? I know each particular guitar varies, and yes, the 2016s are very nice, but I don't think they made any significant internal changes. The 2016 Vintage is light as a feather, but a 2016 standard vs a previous standard shouldn't have much difference.

 

The quilted maple does weigh quite a bit more than mahogany. Quilted mahogany is also a bit warmer than flamed mahogany.

 

Jesse, for as long as I can remember, players talk about the ease of playing a short scale guitar compared to regular scale. I must have something wrong with me since I can honestly say I can't feel a difference when I switch from one of my short scale to regular scale guitars. My 185 plays the same to me as my 150.....go figure. [confused]

No, you're right. It is fairly subtle for me, too--Neither is better, but having both is a lot of fun. I love that the neck is just a tiny bit shorter, frets a little closer together (for better or worse). If you use lowered tunings, you'll be able to tell that the tension is lower compared, but a decent setup makes 25.5" perfectly playable. But I just meant that the quality of tone changes based on the difference between scales, nevermind the differences in how they play. I think that is part of the secret to the Hummingbird's warmth and certainly to the J-45's warmth.

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That maple one sounds a little lacking in warmth

 

So they still make mahogany ones in that colour ??

 

 

And half a booby is bette than no booby , but the girls video was so obviously a studio version of the song with a video added later , or vice versa ..:

 

She kind of annoyed me to be honest

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All true except that a maple Hummingbird is definitely NOT a Dove in different trim. The different scale lengths really seem to make a difference. 24.75" or 25.5" scale length, is almost as big a difference as mahogany vs maple.

 

This is true. To exaggerate the point, putting a capo up the neck, out of cowboy chord territory does add a sense of intimacy to the sound. As far as maple goes, the question to be considered might be how it acts on a large, square-shouldered short scale guitar vs, say, a small Nick Lucas or 00-sized guitar. The SJ-200 is admittedly a bit of an anomaly, but to those who have both; is the maple louder than the rosewood version?

 

 

Jesse, for as long as I can remember, players talk about the ease of playing a short scale guitar compared to regular scale. I must have something wrong with me since I can honestly say I can't feel a difference when I switch from one of my short scale to regular scale guitars. My 185 plays the same to me as my 150.....go figure. [confused]

 

It could also depend on your playing style- if you were more of a strummer, vs trying to make some big reaches for some cleanly-fretted fingerstyle or maybe some country blues pickin'.

 

 

So they still make mahogany ones in that colour ??

 

Yes, PeteJMurray from the Hummingbird Selection thread could always get a recent 'Bird in the iconic red 60's burst in mahogany to get the true bird flavor. . . and christen it with his belated father's name, etc. in his honor.

 

And half a booby is better than no booby , but the girls video was so obviously a studio version of the song with a video added later , or vice versa ..:

 

She kind of annoyed me to be honest

 

Well, she was fairly preoccupied with styling pretty, so . . .

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Jesse, for as long as I can remember, players talk about the ease of playing a short scale guitar compared to regular scale. I must have something wrong with me since I can honestly say I can't feel a difference when I switch from one of my short scale to regular scale guitars. My 185 plays the same to me as my 150.....go figure. [confused]

 

I think if you are practiced it is that you don't notice a difficulty between the two because you are strong enough for the hardest to play. Fender/Gibson players have to be strong enough to maul their Teles, but maintain control and discipline while playing the "easier" Les Paul, they don't notice any difference after a while they are all just guitars.

 

rct

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Are the 2016s lighter? I know each particular guitar varies, and yes, the 2016s are very nice, but I don't think they made any significant internal changes. The 2016 Vintage is light as a feather, but a 2016 standard vs a previous standard shouldn't have much difference.

 

I got a standard 2015 (built in 2016, but 2015 model) and i tried the 2016 "new model", i didnt have both to compare next to next though, but the new seemed lighter to me when i took it in hands, i got surprised.

Dunno if it was the case though.

Couldnt see much difference either in tone or projection, both have this hummy wibe in them and seemed close.

Couldnt see any difference either with the edges things on fretboard, nor in wood appearance (2015 was AAA, 2016 AA, but looked same to me); im no expert though.

 

Since they were built same year, maybe the main difference was about the pickup...

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That maple one sounds a little lacking in warmth

 

So they still make mahogany ones in that colour ??

 

 

And half a booby is bette than no booby , but the girls video was so obviously a studio version of the song with a video added later , or vice versa ..:

 

She kind of annoyed me to be honest

Yeah, I'm all for boobies, but marketing drives me nuts (and not in the same way that boobies drive me nuts)

 

I only have my personal experience with a (dead-stringed) 2014 Quilt Hummingbird to draw upon, but it was so tasty warm. Maybe it was just my player's perspective (i.e. sounds different from in front), and the dead strings. It blew me away though. At that point, I didn't think I'd ever want a maple guitar (which, admittedly, was my own psychologically strategy to talk myself out of my SJ-200 love, but now I have an SJ-200, and it might be my favorite of favorites). It was then I realized that Gibson are the wizards of maple.

 

Of course, as 62Burst says, the body shape has an awful lot to do with it, but I think Gibson's bracing also has a lot to do with it, even on the small maple Gibsons (full disclosure: I have yet to play any Gibson maples except: J-185, J-200, Hummingbird quilt--but I have listened to lots of maple Nick Lucases, and they don't seem to lack in the warmth).

 

I didn't know one could get a mahogany Bird in a true cherry sunburst. (The maple one, or at least that maple one, is actually a "bright cherry sunburst," where as the standard comes in "Heritage cherry sunburst," and my vintage is "Vintage Cherry Sunburst"....... and for instance the Donovan J-45 is just a plain cherry sunburst, which they don't seem to use much anymore and really should.) I would still like something in a true cherry sunburst. I might even settle for a honeyburst. You need a degree in guitar finishes to even keep up with all the variations when, deep down, all you want is a dang cherry sunburst.

 

I think if you are practiced it is that you don't notice a difficulty between the two because you are strong enough for the hardest to play. Fender/Gibson players have to be strong enough to maul their Teles, but maintain control and discipline while playing the "easier" Les Paul, they don't notice any difference after a while they are all just guitars.

 

rct

I play the blues (but not on purpose) on just about any electric guitar... When I used to use medium strings on everything, it was even worse. When I first started trying out Hummingbirds (light strings, 24.75" scale) I would bend all over. I've been told I have a grip that is far too hard, but if I don't grip hard, I get buzzes.

 

I got a standard 2015 (built in 2016, but 2015 model) and i tried the 2016 "new model", i didnt have both to compare next to next though, but the new seemed lighter to me when i took it in hands, i got surprised.

Dunno if it was the case though.

Couldnt see much difference either in tone or projection, both have this hummy wibe in them and seemed close.

Couldnt see any difference either with the edges things on fretboard, nor in wood appearance (2015 was AAA, 2016 AA, but looked same to me); im no expert though.

 

Since they were built same year, maybe the main difference was about the pickup...

Hard to tell I guess. It is all very subtle, or at least to me it is. I wish we could get everyone and all these guitars in the same place and really do some comparing.

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Here's my new used 2016 Hummingbird Standard. The first pic is with a flash and makes it look a bit redder then it really is.

 

bird-1_zpsaljftq1p.jpg

bird-2_zpsbtycwruu.jpg

 

Sweet, what a gorgeous burst.Are you sure that's a used guitar looks pretty minty to me.

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Never noticed this thread before. Though I don’t own a Hummingbird I read all the way through.  Great thread!

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Wow so much new and beautiful. My '64 hummer is beat and refinished (somebody painted it Periwinkle blue in the '60s) but it's something about old spruce and Honduran mahogany that makes a sound so sweet and loud that all my test drives on the newer models  seem tame, and to be frank, kind of lame. Oh and lets see someone find another with the L5 fingerboard!

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Edited by Holiday Hoser

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22 hours ago, Dewey Miller said:

I’ve joined the family! 2011 mystic Rosewood. Now gotta work on the set up. Any advice?

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Beautiful. And the Honeyburst is one of my favorite bursts. Rosewood makes for a great sounding Hummingbird. If you can't get local recommendations for a luthier to get your new bird set up for your playing style, you could always turn it over and have a fine coffee table.

Congrats.

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4 hours ago, ThemisSal said:

Well... four Hummingbirds have come and gone for me, including the one I posted about earlier in this thread..

 

i do do have a Country Western now... which structurally is a Bird. But no cool guard. And not technically a Bird. Wait I shouldn’t be in here... I’ll show myself out.

 

Sure by the time you've made your way out the door you'll probably have bought another one 

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I never noticed this thread either! 😲 Of course, I should never join any club that would have someone like me as a member, but here goes...

... as of November 2018.

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Edited by drathbun

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26 minutes ago, TIMT said:

Here's an early 1968 with only a few hours of playing time on it.  It belonged to my wife's uncle, who bought it new to learn how to play.

Early 68, , , guess we see from the still thin back braces. I have an SJ from that same year (or could be 69), which has moved into the bulkier business. 
Do try to find an original ceramic saddle - will change the sound significantly and it's fun to switch back'n'forth while learning.

Enjoy this well-kept beauty and send us a video. 

Welcome aboard

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23 hours ago, E-minor7 said:

Early 68, , , guess we see from the still thin back braces. I have an SJ from that same year (or could be 69), which has moved into the bulkier business. 
Do try to find an original ceramic saddle - will change the sound significantly and it's fun to switch back'n'forth while learning.

Enjoy this well-kept beauty and send us a video. 

Welcome aboard

Thanks for your observation of the thin braces.  I was expecting the guitar to feel heavier than it is.  I'm looking for a ceramic saddle, but for now I have a bone saddle I'll try.  My main guitar is a Santa Cruz TR, so this Hummingbird is definitely different!  Thankfully the guitar strings were slacked for storage and there is little top deformation.  Overall, there's not a nick or scratch anywhere - looks like my wife's uncle didn't go far in his learning/playing.  

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On 8/19/2019 at 8:37 AM, TIMT said:

Here's an early 1968 with only a few hours of playing time on it.  It belonged to my wife's uncle, who bought it new to learn how to play.  (Sorry for the repost - I've added a better picture of the back but thought that I was editing the original post).

  On 8/19/2019 at 9:09 AM, E-minor7 said:

Early 68, , , guess we see from the still thin back braces. I have an SJ from that same year (or could be 69), which has moved into the bulkier business. 
Do try to find an original ceramic saddle - will change the sound significantly and it's fun to switch back'n'forth while learning.

Enjoy this well-kept beauty and send us a video. 

Welcome aboard

 

On 8/19/2019 at 8:37 AM, TIMT said:

 

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IMG_2781.JPG

 

IMG_2793.JPG

Edited by TIMT
updated picture

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On 5/30/2016 at 9:33 AM, BirdMan81 said:

 

I have a 2013 True Vintage I bought in 2017. A real sweetheart. The label says "Custom Shop."  

Specs as I know them:

Vintage Cherry Sunburst finish, AAA grade Sitka spruce top,  mahogany sides and back, X scalloped bracing, Madagascar rosewood bridge and fingerboard, bone nut and saddle, tortoise pickguard with floral Hummingbird design (hand painted), Nut width: 1.725”  Pearl Paralellogram inlays, Gold Gotoh Green Button Tuners, Tapered Dovetail Neck Joint, Waverly bone bridge pins, Original Vintage brown HSC

TONE to die for. Plays great. I tried lots of strings and Elixir light nano PB are far and away the best strings for this guitar. (I don't like them on any other guitar.)

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Hi everyone,

Glad to join the family.

I play a 2017 Hummingbird Heritage Cherry Sunburst.

As regarding strings, I use Gibson Masterbuilt Premium Phosphore Bronze Wound Light Gauge 12-53

The picks i use are mainly Jim Dunlop 1mm Nylon Standard, Jim  Dunlop Tortex 1mm & Gibson Nylon Standard 1mm

This is definetely the very best guitar ever.

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'64 Hummer with L5 fingerboard refinished in the 60's after some long haired hippy type pinko fa9 painted it periwinkle blue. A true beater but sounds like heaven. One word here kids, Photobucket (bad) Imgur (Goood)

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Edited by Holiday Hoser

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