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Do you really need to adjust pole pieces on a humbucker?


PMC

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I read sometime ago that one of the "standard" or "popular" ways to adjust them is to do the 10 o'clock/2 o'clock arrangement like

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such that the screw tops match the neck/string curvature.

My SG came adjusted this way (I am not sure it was done at the factory or at the dealer).

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I read sometime ago that one of the "standard" or "popular" ways to adjust them is to do the 10 o'clock/2 o'clock arrangement like

////

such that the screw tops match the neck/string curvature.

My SG came adjusted this way (I am not sure it was done at the factory or at the dealer).

 

If you put the slots in a straight line, you could short out the pickup.

 

If they criss-cross, they'll be out of phase.

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For optimal string balance, the height of the screws should match the fretboard radius (12" on a Les Paul). Some players bring up certain strings to change that balance - more treble strings for searing leads or more bass string emphasis for chunky rhythm, etc. However, if you are happy with the sound (string balance) there is no real reason to adjust them, regardless of where the pole heights are set.

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I've adjusted mine out of necessity. I bought the LP used and the prior owner had both e string magnets cranked way up. I guess he/she was trying to get a scooped sound? I turned them down close to even and flat across the deck. As far as I know, there's no point in cranking them up too far because the magnetic pull can kill sustain.

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Thanks for all the info guys, I like the sound I am getting so I think I will leave well enough alone. Sometimes I just have to tell myself, stop tinkering.

 

When I take it in to a trusted guitar tech for a once over I will leave it in their hands.....maybe

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Thanks for all the info guys' date=' I like the sound I am getting so I think I will leave well enough alone. Sometimes I just have to tell myself, stop tinkering.

 

When I take it in to a trusted guitar tech for a once over I will leave it in their hands.....maybe[/quote']

 

Tinkering will make you go blind.

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I've found that the biggest difference happens only with the D and G strings. On most of my Gibsons, the G pole is the highest. The D is much lower than the G, and the A is just a touch higher than the D.

 

As for the treble stings, adjusting the poles, at least I find, doesn't do anything. You have to adjust the slant of the whole pickup higher on the treble side for there to be a noticeable change.

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Seth Lover completed his design for the humbucking pickup. Gibson said how can we make it look better ?

Lover said "I'll add a row of screws".

 

A little psychology goes a long way...

Yes' date=' it was just a marketing thing in the beginning. Turned out it did have [i']some [/i]benefit to players. But still, height adjustment on the sides is more effective.

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If you ever had a non-adjustable, specifically when playing clean, you will notice that small diameter strings;

the 1st & 4th will sound weaker than the others, especially the rythym pickup.

Most people don't notice, so its not an issue.

 

In my case, I have to be able to play clean or distorted, no matter what style.

So, I'm one of those few obsessed individuals that can hear the difference and will adjust the poles as soon as I notice something different.

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