Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums
Sign in to follow this  
RockyA

Gibson with Fender Amps

Recommended Posts

Those using Fender amps such as Deluxe Reverb, Twin Reverb, Vibrolux, Princeton, etc that have inputs 1 and 2. Who plugs there LPs, 335s, SGs, etc into input 1 or 2 mostly. Which input do you play the most?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Fender Hot Rod Deluxe and plug my Gibsons (ES-335, Les Pauls and SGs all passive) into input 1. My Ltd H-7 7 string with active EMGs is the only guitar that I plug into input 2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On Fender amps generally input 1 is for single coils & input 2 is for humbuckers. Whatever sounds best for you. Of course I could be wrong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always use input #1. That's the one designed for guitars with regular passive pickups. Input #2 was designed for microphones with a stronger signal and it sounds quieter than #1. That's why very few people use it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Usually input 2 on my Fender Hot Rod Deville 2x12, as it is supposedly attenuated for humbuckers, although I just got a Gibson All American II with single coils that I'll try running through input 1. The bigger issue I've had with the Hot Rod Deville is how damn loud it is; I'm used to running a JCM900 half-stack at half power/50w and being able to push the tubes harder, but I can't crank the Deville past 2 or 3.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would always go with input 1. It has 1 MOhms and won't load down pickups significantly. The typical input 2 design includes a voltage divider using two 68 kOhms or 75 kOhms resistors and thus is a 136 kOhms or 150 kOhms load, cutting volume in general by 6 dB and furthermore attenuating the pickup/cable resonance to about similar extent, depending on pickup(s) and cable used.

 

The very sense of input 2 can be to avoid distorting the input stage with hot pickups for clean tones. However, it will affect tone when plugging the guitar directly. Using NON-BYPASS (!) FX pedals will preserve the guitar tone in this case. True-bypass FX pedals should never be used exclusively or as single FX pedal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 90's DRRI and I always only use input 1 on channel 2. Guess I could try input 2 when wanting to jam at lower levels, but non of my guitars are high output.

 

btw I always use channel 2 because that one has tasty spring reverb and rich, delicious tremolo. The bright cap is annoying as F, though. Some day I'll get the amp mod'd with a push/pull knob to bypass it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use input one on my DRRI and Twin Reverb with all my guitars. As far as Gibson guitars I play an ES335 and Les Pauls. Fender guitars are Telecasters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too used to think input one was for single coils and input 2 for humbuckers but according to Fender Amp manuals input 2 has less gain than input 2 (-6dbl) and is used for high output and pre-amplified instruments.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...