Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums
Sign in to follow this  
sbpark

How would you compare an Advanced Jumbo and a Hummingbird?

Recommended Posts

"is has been scientifically demonstrated that long scale instruments do have higher string tension. "

disagree, respectfully
Sound like one of those voters that likes to create their own reality. One may be more comfortable playing a guitar with higher string tension, but that doesnt mean there is less tension.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"is has been scientifically demonstrated that long scale instruments do have higher string tension. " Sound like one of those voters that likes to create their own reality. One may be more comfortable playing a guitar with higher string tension, but that doesnt mean there is less tension.

 

+1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think it's almost my duty to chime in here.

 

As some of you probably remember, I had a 1966 CW, which was re-necked to longer scale a few years ago.

The difference not only in volume, but also in voice was significant.

Though the guitar had the top replaced/braced by a Gibson luthier around 1980, it still sounded more or less like a mid-60's vintage square.

The reason I decided to make the move was

1/ that it had the narrow nut width - 2/ it already been modified - 3/ it presented something within the sound I found really precious.

But funnily enough only after being played for a while.

I don't believe my acoustic pal understood the move - he saw it as over-doing.

Still I searched for the right G-neck - found it on X-mas eve 2011 and soon got my own luthier goin'. He too thought the mission was a bit weird.

 

But in short :

The sound, , , the whole guitar totally changed. Won't nerd into detail, but as said power was increased with, , , should we say between 6 and 9 %.

(Heavier string gauge representing 1 to 2 %).

 

Regarding tension, I never really focused in that, but tend to trust McMaster.

Yet have to ask. Maybe your logic is obvious, but there is also another factor, isn't there.

Everything will be more flexible the longer it is - a rubber band, a metal ruler, a full scale river bridge. It must play in here too, , , or. . .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At times like these, it's nice to just be able to pick up a guitar and PLAY THE FUXKING THING without considering much beyond that👹

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

seems easier to bend on a 25.5 than 24.75,...bee deep bee deep bee deep-thats all folks!!! still puzzeled j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This would be a good place to start a farm, what with all the manure flying around.

 

A longer scale guitar has higher tension on the strings, full stop. It's not debatable. Having said that, however, it's not the only factor, and maybe not even the most significant factor that determines playability. Neck profile (includes depth, shape, width, etc,) along with nut width, bridge spacing, fretboard radius, string gauge and type--and how you hold the instrument--all play into playability. IMO, much too much is made of scale length. If you have trouble stretching your fingers or if you like to bend strings, a shorter scale length can help. A little. Usually, not always. In theory, you should also get a slightly warmer, softer tone with a shorter scale length. The longer scale length should provide a crisper, louder tone, but again, there are other factors. So play the guitar you like. The other stuff is just static unless you really know what your'e doing with acoustical physics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...