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The Partisan


Mojorule

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Thanks Flatters. As you can see, I was trying to send the sound waves directly down under.

 

Originally written by a man who worked with Raymond and Lucie Aubrac in the Resistance, then became de Gaulle's Minister of the Interior after the war.

 

LC got the words wrong in French, which goes to show that growing up in Montreal doesn't guarantee bilingualism. Still his 1969 performance is extraordinary, as is the live version from the 2008-2009 tour with the amazing accompaniment from Javier Mas. LC massively improved on the original musical arrangement, which goes to show that his musical gifts were rather greater than people tend to give him credit for:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uTMe6-6VSuQ

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I confess I had not heard this tune. What a tale, sad yet hopeful. Sets the mind to imagining the times it depicts. Good job, Mojo! [thumbup]

 

Went off and listened to Cohen's recording and read some about the history of the song. Seems there's a bit of controversy over the translation of the last lines........ The French phrase, Nous rentrerons dans l'ombre translates We'll get into the shadow, but is sung as Then we'll come from the shadows. A French website about the song says this is contrary to the intent of the lyric, that once freedom comes, the resistance will melt back into anonymity, wanting no more than to return to their pre-war lives as they were. Guess it's true that sometimes things get lost in translation............

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I confess I had not heard this tune. What a tale, sad yet hopeful. Sets the mind to imagining the times it depicts. Good job, Mojo! [thumbup]

 

Went off and listened to Cohen's recording and read some about the history of the song. Seems there's a bit of controversy over the translation of the last lines........ The French phrase, Nous rentrerons dans l'ombre translates We'll get into the shadow, but is sung as Then we'll come from the shadows. A French website about the song says this is contrary to the intent of the lyric, that once freedom comes, the resistance will melt back into anonymity, wanting no more than to return to their pre-war lives as they were. Guess it's true that sometimes things get lost in translation............

Nice bit of scholarship, Buc. Gets me thinking about things that old folkies think about more often these days.

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Thanks all.

 

I confess I had not heard this tune. What a tale, sad yet hopeful. Sets the mind to imagining the times it depicts. Good job, Mojo! [thumbup]

 

Went off and listened to Cohen's recording and read some about the history of the song. Seems there's a bit of controversy over the translation of the last lines........ The French phrase, Nous rentrerons dans l'ombre translates We'll get into the shadow, but is sung as Then we'll come from the shadows. A French website about the song says this is contrary to the intent of the lyric, that once freedom comes, the resistance will melt back into anonymity, wanting no more than to return to their pre-war lives as they were. Guess it's true that sometimes things get lost in translation............

 

Indeed, as OC says, nicely excavated, Buc. I prefer the French lyric if truth be told, not least because of this perspective. At roughly the same time, another Resistance poet was musing over whether he could defend his memory/justify being remembered in the face of forgetting, I think in a way which suggests not:

 

My link.

 

(Problematic English translation here: My link.)

 

Perhaps there was something in the Vichy water.

 

Great to have you back on the saddle Mojo, and sharing material again. How your Woody SJ, do you still have 2 year old strings on her ?

 

Thanks Ozymandias. To be honest, I've now lost track of which strings have been replaced when. I'm pretty sure that some of them are the originals which came with the guitar 5 years ago. Still sounds great, though, weather-permitting.

 

Actually not a great weather day on Saturday: too much damp, so the Woody sounded a bit lifeless, even before my cheap phone started overlaying weird out-of-phase effects and odd camera angles during recording. Sounded really cracking a few weeks ago, at the end of October. Still a touch of warmth in the air, and a certain dryness which just bring out the best in the guitar.

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