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Jack Fossett

Casino Coupe v ES339 Pro

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Cool video, and it's easy to see why people might be going back and forth about

these two excellent Epis.

 

My solution to the dilemma was to buy the Epiphone ES-339 P-90 pro. I'm a very happy Epi owner.

The ES-339 weighs about 8 pounds (3.5 Kilos), so it's heavier than my SG but similar to a Tele.

Lighter than a Les Paul anyway.

Dunno if the Casino coupe is lighter, but I think it is. No maple center block (the log).

 

I really was going to get the Casino Coupe. I had four other electric guitars, all with

Hum bucking pickups. So the P-90 niche was unfilled, and as soon as I played the Casino Coupe

at a guitar store I was hooked on the size and shape and the excellent neck.

 

I'd been looking hard at the Gibson ES-339 with the '57 Classic hum buckers... this guitar is a

real prize IMHO, but it seemed expensive. Most other Gibbie arch tops are much more expensive

of course... when I was looking, the Gibson ES-339 was priced about $2000. They are more now.

Gibson makes a stripped down "studio' version of the ES-339 for about $1700... but when M/F

put the Epiphone version on sale, I had to pounce. The Gibson and the Epiphone are both

plywood guitars. The Gibson is certainly more elegant, but is it worth so much more money?

 

I got my Epi for $339 brand new (with no case). At that price, I could buy it because I was curious.

You can spend a lot more on fast women and slow horses, and have a lot less fun than I've had

with my Epi. Sorry. I figure I saved enough on the price to afford a hard shell Epi case, and

new hardware and wiring. I bought the blonde ES-339, and decided she should have a

Blonde/Black motif going.

 

So my Epiphone ES-339 P-90 pro sports

>Gotoh locking tuners (black)

>Tusq nut (black)

>hand wound P-90s from Rose Pickups

>Gotoh Bridge and Tailpiece (black)

>High quality wiring harness from Sigler Music with CTS 500k pots and Switchcraft switch and jack

>hand made ebony pickguard carved out of headstock veneer from Stewmac.

 

These parts were not cripplingly expensive. It doesn't pay to spend more on upgrades than your guitar is worth,

unless you really like the guitar (which I do). But I got very good quality parts, better than what was on there new.

I wasn't intending to dive into the innards, because that's such a PITA with a semi-hollow guitar.

I played it stock for almost a year, but when the switch began to crackle, I decided to pull the whole

shebang out of there and install better quality parts. Because by that time, I had bonded well with this

instrument and wanted her to have the best. Also, because of the hassle factor and the lack of an access door,

I only wanted to do this once.

 

The P-90 pickups are wired so that with the switch in the middle, they form a big hum bucker and single coil

hum is almost eliminated. Love the tone, love the feel of the small semi-hollow body and love the neck.

I sanded the back of my Epi's neck with green kitchen scrubbie pads, this removes most of the sticky Polyurethane feel.

I actually do this with all of my guitars and basses. It makes a big difference IMHO.

 

Anyway, the ES-339 P-90 pro solved the dilemma for me, and is an excellent asset to my arsenal of tones.

The blonde guitar with the black hardware and pickups looks very cool, and she balances perfectly and

I've been really enjoying this one.

 

Also, this was my vote in the great 2015 Gibson Guitar bashing festival. There was so much honking negativity

being thrown around concerning Gibson's 2015 line of guitars, I just stepped away from it all in disgust.

It was all blowing smoke of course, the 2015s are lovely things, and work very well. But players resented the

higher prices and the lack of choice about the new 'improvements." So Gibson had to eat crow.

And I bought a new Epiphone, and happily replaced parts on it till I had exactly what I wanted.

She can take her place alongside my Gibson SGs and Fender Tele and not give up a thing.

post-57682-075232300 1480299196_thumb.jpg

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Cool video, and it's easy to see why people might be going back and forth about

these two excellent Epis.

 

My solution to the dilemma was to buy the Epiphone ES-339 P-90 pro. I'm a very happy Epi owner.

The ES-339 weighs about 8 pounds (3.5 Kilos), so it's heavier than my SG but similar to a Tele.

Lighter than a Les Paul anyway.

Dunno if the Casino coupe is lighter, but I think it is. No maple center block (the log).

 

I really was going to get the Casino Coupe. I had four other electric guitars, all with

Hum bucking pickups. So the P-90 niche was unfilled, and as soon as I played the Casino Coupe

at a guitar store I was hooked on the size and shape and the excellent neck.

 

I'd been looking hard at the Gibson ES-339 with the '57 Classic hum buckers... this guitar is a

real prize IMHO, but it seemed expensive. Most other Gibbie arch tops are much more expensive

of course... when I was looking, the Gibson ES-339 was priced about $2000. They are more now.

Gibson makes a stripped down "studio' version of the ES-339 for about $1700... but when M/F

put the Epiphone version on sale, I had to pounce. The Gibson and the Epiphone are both

plywood guitars. The Gibson is certainly more elegant, but is it worth so much more money?

 

I got my Epi for $339 brand new (with no case). At that price, I could buy it because I was curious.

You can spend a lot more on fast women and slow horses, and have a lot less fun than I've had

with my Epi. Sorry. I figure I saved enough on the price to afford a hard shell Epi case, and

new hardware and wiring. I bought the blonde ES-339, and decided she should have a

Blonde/Black motif going.

 

So my Epiphone ES-339 P-90 pro sports

>Gotoh locking tuners (black)

>Tusq nut (black)

>hand wound P-90s from Rose Pickups

>Gotoh Bridge and Tailpiece (black)

>High quality wiring harness from Sigler Music with CTS 500k pots and Switchcraft switch and jack

>hand made ebony pickguard carved out of headstock veneer from Stewmac.

 

These parts were not cripplingly expensive. It doesn't pay to spend more on upgrades than your guitar is worth,

unless you really like the guitar (which I do). But I got very good quality parts, better than what was on there new.

I wasn't intending to dive into the innards, because that's such a PITA with a semi-hollow guitar.

I played it stock for almost a year, but when the switch began to crackle, I decided to pull the whole

shebang out of there and install better quality parts. Because by that time, I had bonded well with this

instrument and wanted her to have the best. Also, because of the hassle factor and the lack of an access door,

I only wanted to do this once.

 

The P-90 pickups are wired so that with the switch in the middle, they form a big hum bucker and single coil

hum is almost eliminated. Love the tone, love the feel of the small semi-hollow body and love the neck.

I sanded the back of my Epi's neck with green kitchen scrubbie pads, this removes most of the sticky Polyurethane feel.

I actually do this with all of my guitars and basses. It makes a big difference IMHO.

 

Anyway, the ES-339 P-90 pro solved the dilemma for me, and is an excellent asset to my arsenal of tones.

The blonde guitar with the black hardware and pickups looks very cool, and she balances perfectly and

I've been really enjoying this one.

 

Also, this was my vote in the great 2015 Gibson Guitar bashing festival. There was so much honking negativity

being thrown around concerning Gibson's 2015 line of guitars, I just stepped away from it all in disgust.

It was all blowing smoke of course, the 2015s are lovely things, and work very well. But players resented the

higher prices and the lack of choice about the new 'improvements." So Gibson had to eat crow.

And I bought a new Epiphone, and happily replaced parts on it till I had exactly what I wanted.

She can take her place alongside my Gibson SGs and Fender Tele and not give up a thing.

post-57682-075232300 1480299196_thumb.jpg

 

Nice appraisal. Thanks for sharing.

 

I too was considering an Epi ES-339 Pro, but decided to try the Gibsons out first. That meant traveling to Andertons in Guildford. I didnt much like the 3 they had in the shop, and thought I would not be bringing one home, but then found I loved the Studio version they fetched over from the warehouse.

 

Before buying the Studio, I picked up what I thought was another ES-339, except that it was much lighter. It turned out to be an ES-390 which is of course the Gibson equivalent to the Casino Coupe. I couldn't get that guitar out of my head, so after a couple more months I bought a Casino Coupe. The full hollowbody Coupe is lovely to handle.

 

Despite that I have decided to part with it because I just cant live with too many guitars about the place. I dont regret buying it. I gigged it just once and it did just fine, though I did struggle a bit with feedback at that time. Though I've enjoyed using it, I've had my fun & someone else can enjoy it now.

 

The ES-339 and the Casino Coupe are only superficially alike. The Coupe is very much louder acoustically, while the ES-339's sound is closer to that of a solidbody, though personally I think it still sounds richer than an LP equipped with the same pickups. The ES-399 still has some propensity to feedback, but its easily controlled and I enjoy finishing a tune with FB when using it. :)

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yes, the Gibson ES-339 studio version give you all of the rawk and kerang, and not such

a high price tag. Hard to beat. I cast my vote for the Epi version and do not regret my choice.

 

The Gibson version is one to be proud of, and to show off.

The Epi version is one to play and gig with (after upgrades), and pay the bills.

Both approaches have their merits and advantages. That's why both Gibson and Epiphone can

coexist.

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yes, the Gibson ES-339 studio version give you all of the rawk and kerang, and not such

a high price tag. Hard to beat. I cast my vote for the Epi version and do not regret my choice.

 

The Gibson version is one to be proud of, and to show off.

The Epi version is one to play and gig with (after upgrades), and pay the bills.

Both approaches have their merits and advantages. That's why both Gibson and Epiphone can

coexist.

 

You bet. The biggest appeal of the Epi for me is the coil split. None of the the Gibsons have that.

 

PS

I feel no pride for any of my guitars. They are just tools.

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