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Dave's fret fix (no more dirty divots)


daveinspain
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Ok, I have been dying to try this so I'd go head and try fixing one fret and see how it comes out. I like the results and it wasn't hard at all, I just followed the instructions in the second video I posted on the What to do about divots thread... Here are some pics of the results. Now I have no idea how long this will last, time will tell. I'll keep you posted.

 

Before:

 

P1130610_zps7qyw4kth.jpg

 

Getting prepadred to fix the fret in the middle, it had the worst divots:

 

P1130619_zpsjvcuzjb1.jpg

 

Silver solder applied:

 

P1130620_zpsjigavlqd.jpg

 

finished result ( not bad for my first one...)

 

P1130623_zpsquakhrpc.jpg

 

Finished, took me like two hours to do the whole job, including going to the hardware store for supplies... I only did the first 8 frets though. Thats all that needed it.

 

P1130630_zps84m2ve1y.jpg

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that looks really good Dave.

 

 

did you have to re-level any frets?

 

nice work!

 

Didn't have to do anything else. just filled the divots with the solder and filed down the solder, sanded and polished. Guitar plays as good as new and there is no way you can tell it was ever worked on. I am so happy... [biggrin]

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What solder did you use exactly? For health reasons, it has to be free of lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd), and all the low-melting solders are quite soft. I wasn't able to find any silver solder aka hard solder or brazing solder with a melting point below 420°C respectively 788°F, most of them melt much higher, in any case much too hot to handle without flame and for fretboard materials.

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What solder did you use exactly? For health reasons, it has to be free of lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd), and all the low-melting solders are quite soft. I wasn't able to find any silver solder aka hard solder or brazing solder with a melting point below 420°C respectively 788°F, most of them melt much higher, in any case much too hot to handle without flame and for fretboard materials.

Yeah good question. That's why I was thinking there's no way this will not damage the binding or fretboard. Sounds like Dave probably used 63/37 or 60/40, I'm doubtful that it's actually Silver solder but curious to hear what Dave says

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What solder did you use exactly? For health reasons, it has to be free of lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd), and all the low-melting solders are quite soft. I wasn't able to find any silver solder aka hard solder or brazing solder with a melting point below 420°C respectively 788°F, most of them melt much higher, in any case much too hot to handle without flame and for fretboard materials.

 

I went to a plumbing supply store and asked for silver solder. I didn't ask for any specific kind or special values. I just took what they gave me. I use a good adjustable soldering iron on it's highest setting. There may be much better solders to use but as I am no pro or scientist I just hoped for good results with what I got. I've been practicing with it today and I must say it plays amazingly well. No buzzes or dead spots. Will it last forever. I doubt it but for now my guitar is playable again and it wasn't that hard or time consuming to do.

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I went to a plumbing supply store and asked for silver solder. I didn't ask for any specific kind or special values. I just took what they gave me. I use a good adjustable soldering iron on it's highest setting. There may be much better solders to use but as I am no pro or scientist I just hoped for good results with what I got. I've been practicing with it today and I must say it plays amazingly well. No buzzes or dead spots. Will it last forever. I doubt it but for now my guitar is playable again and it wasn't that hard or time consuming to do.

That's most likely not silver solder but it may be lead free so hopefully you at least don't have to worry about lead poisoning when you play the guitar.

 

The label on the solder should tell you what it's made of. If you don't understand you could post a pic of it here.

 

The relevant info you could gain from that is if its lead free or not.. You wouldn't want to play the guitar and then eat a sandwich if it's not lead free. Of course you would also absorb the lead through your fingers

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Looks really nice - that said if you ever decide to try this again you might want to get the solder from a jeweler supply store and get true artist grade silver solder. It can be obtained in three hardness levels soft, medium and hard and the amount of heat needed to melt it is different for each one. It's harder to apply medium and hard because of the heat requirements but when finished it's actually a bit harder than any other solder. Lead is a toxic substance true but to fear it is unreasonable, it's not gonna kill you if you touch it. Just like so many things it got a bad name when it used to be delivered to all of us in huge amounts through water pipes paint and almost everything else we made. I work as a jewelery artist every day and use lead on a very common bases several times a week to press molds and other things in presses, I don't breath the fumes if I can help it and I don't eat it, but that's about it for safety precautions. After a day of handling it in the presses my hands are black from the lead and I have be been doing this for three + decades now. Medical exams and tests in physicals show no lead above average in my system at all, in fact it's lower than average because I live in a pretty new area and our water supply is fairly new.

 

Back to your job that looks fantastic Dave, amazing job, I hope it works as good as it looks.

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