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Speaker cab connections


Johnny 6 String

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Hey Everyone;

 

Hope everyone is happy and healthy for the New Year.

 

Looking for some clarification on series vs parallel switching for multiple cabs.

 

Here is my scenario

I have a micro dark head and an old orange mini extension cab which I'm pretty sure the two jacks are parallel. Its 8 ohm, the head is min 8 ohm. To add a second of the same cab for a mini stack would give a 4 ohm load to the head.

Would it be possible to add a switch to change the jack from parallel to series the same way you can mod a pick up? Or am I missing some thing?

 

Thanks Johnny

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Guest Farnsbarns

Hey Everyone;

 

Hope everyone is happy and healthy for the New Year.

 

Looking for some clarification on series vs parallel switching for multiple cabs.

 

Here is my scenario

I have a micro dark head and an old orange mini extension cab which I'm pretty sure the two jacks are parallel. Its 8 ohm, the head is min 8 ohm. To add a second of the same cab for a mini stack would give a 4 ohm load to the head.

Would it be possible to add a switch to change the jack from parallel to series the same way you can mod a pick up? Or am I missing some thing?

 

Thanks Johnny

 

I'm not sure this makes sense. just to clarify...

 

I think your head has only 1 output marked min 8ohms. You have a cab with an "out" jack allowing you to connect another cab in a "daisy chain" arrangement?

 

If that's right you have correctly identified that it matters whether that jack in the cab would put a second cab in series or in parallel. Can you get the exact model number of the cab? Or, can you take a picture of the wiring in the cab?

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I'm not sure this makes sense. just to clarify...

 

I think your head has only 1 output marked min 8ohms. You have a cab with an "out" jack allowing you to connect another cab in a "daisy chain" arrangement?

 

If that's right you have correctly identified that it matters whether that jack in the cab would put a second cab in series or in parallel. Can you get the exact model number of the cab? Or, can you take a picture of the wiring in the cab?

 

Thanks Farns

 

You are absolutely correct, head has one output marked 8 ohm min, the cab allows for daisy chaining. The cab is an orange ppc108. The newer version of the cab listed on Orange's site does not allow chaining and I couldn't find the answer of their site.

 

I'll try to get a pic of the wiring tonight.

 

 

Thanks again, Johnny

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... Would it be possible to add a switch to change the jack from parallel to series ...

 

I really don't see the need for a switch, but you do need to rewire the jack panel on the cabinet to a "series" wiring path.

 

AND... once you do this, each jack becomes a specific "Input" and "Output" on the first (pass-through) cabinet.

 

Using just one cab will give you your regular 8ohm load, adding the second cab will give you a 16ohm load.

 

 

One word of caution, it's been my experience that too large of a speaker load can be as bad for an amp as too little of a load, especially transistor amps.

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Guest Farnsbarns

My googling suggests the extra socket is in parallel, should be easy to sort. Post pictures or describe the circuit if you're not sure. Might require use of a switching jack to compete the circuit when no extra cab is connected if changing it to series.

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I really don't see the need for a switch, but you do need to rewire the jack panel on the cabinet to a "series" wiring path.

 

AND... once you do this, each jack becomes a specific "Input" and "Output" on the first (pass-through) cabinet.

 

Using just one cab will give you your regular 8ohm load, adding the second cab will give you a 16ohm load.

 

 

One word of caution, it's been my experience that too large of a speaker load can be as bad for an amp as too little of a load, especially transistor amps.

 

Hey Larry;

 

I think that since it lists 8 min that it would be OK with 16 as it seems a lot of Orange cabs are 16.

I'd be OK with rewiring for an in and out (be easy enough to mark them).

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My googling suggests the extra socket is in parallel, should be easy to sort. Post pictures or describe the circuit if you're not sure. Might require use of a switching jack to compete the circuit when no extra cab is connected if changing it to series.

 

 

Thanks Farms

 

Here are a couple pics, I was surprised to see a board in use at the jacks.

 

http://c7.staticflickr.com/1/683/31707052470_417f2ce161_b.jpg

 

 

http://c4.staticflickr.com/1/345/32082487875_52b1786cec_b.jpg

 

 

I like the idea of a switch (DPDT) as I have one from a past pick up project.

 

Appreciate it if you could draw a diagram for me (list parts if need) if I have to wait to get some parts, I will as I'd haven't got the second cab yet. Birthday is coming up in a couple weeks and I have a card for a shop in the city (I live in the sticks) that will coiver part of the new cab.

 

Thanks Johnny

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Guest Farnsbarns

Thanks Farms

 

Here are a couple pics, I was surprised to see a board in use at the jacks.

 

http://c7.staticflickr.com/1/683/31707052470_417f2ce161_b.jpg

 

 

http://c4.staticflickr.com/1/345/32082487875_52b1786cec_b.jpg

 

 

I like the idea of a switch (DPDT) as I have one from a past pick up project.

 

Appreciate it if you could draw a diagram for me (list parts if need) if I have to wait to get some parts, I will as I'd haven't got the second cab yet. Birthday is coming up in a couple weeks and I have a card for a shop in the city (I live in the sticks) that will coiver part of the new cab.

 

Thanks Johnny

 

Ok. Lose the board. It's just 2 busses as would be expected for a parallel circuit.

 

The simplest method (heed warning in caps at end)

 

Choose which jack will be in and which will be out (that doesn't really make sense for a series circuit but you get my drift).

 

1. Take the red wire from the tip connection on the in jack to the positive connection in the speaker(it'll already go to the + on the speaker).

 

2. Take the black wire from the negative of the speaker (it will already come from - on the speaker) to the tip connection on the out jack.

 

3. Take another wire (make it something other than black or red for simplicity) from the ground ring of the out jack to the ground ring of the in jack.

 

You now have a serial circuit. However, it won't work at all unless there's a second cab and THERE WILL BE NO LOAD ON THE HEAD WITHOUT A SECOND CAB.

 

More to come. Dinner's ready.

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Guest Farnsbarns

More...

 

No need for a switch! (A switch would be risky anyway. You could always end up with no load one way or another) and no parts needed (I think).

 

Looks like they've used stereo switching jacks. Good. To check, put a plug in to one of the sockets. It looks to me like you'll see that the plug lifts all the contacts and breaks the connection to the right (as per the alignment in your picture). If so...

 

We'll call those connections which are disconnected when a plug is in, "switched out". The ones on the right.

 

1. Take the red wire from the non switched tip connection on the in jack to the positive connection in the speaker.

 

2. Take the black wire from the speaker and connect it to the "non switched" tip connection on the out jack

 

3. Now you can take a wire from the "switched out" contact of the tip of the out jack to the "non switched" ground ring of the in jack.

 

4. Take another wire from the "non switched" ground ring of the out jack to the "non switched" ground ring of the in jack.

 

The only connection to one of the "switched out" contacts should be the wire from the "switched out" tip of the out jack back to the in jack.

 

Now when no second cab is connected the return from the speaker (-) will arrive at the tip of the out jack but because there's no plug in it this is connected straight out to the negative on the in jack and you have a single 8ohms speaker cab. When a second cab is connected that wire from tip of out to ring of in won't be connected so the signal goes out to the second cab and back to the in jack via the wire from ring to ring.

 

Does that make sense?

 

I can draw a diagram if not.

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Guest Farnsbarns

Here you go. This is easier. Obviously assumes the board has been removed.

 

Red and black go to speaker + and - as I presume they already do...

 

2017-01-03_22.58.42.jpg

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... Obviously assumes the board has been removed.

 

2017-01-03_22.58.42.jpg

 

This statement and sketch are VERY misleading. The statement, "assumes the board has been removed", needs to have the most important part added "AND DISCARDED".

 

And since it needs to be discarded, it further confuses the issue by using the PCB photo for the "new" wiring diagram. Also, since the board has been discarded and the jacks are "panel mount" (and PCB wired), they now have nothing to mount to or solder wires to.

 

This post is dangerously confusing and unclear.

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Here you go. This is easier. Obviously assumes the board has been removed.

 

Red and black go to speaker + and - as I presume they already do...

 

2017-01-03_22.58.42.jpg

 

Farns and Larry greatly appreciate the replies and cautions.

 

 

Farns

 

Yes they are switching jacks,yes red and black go back the the speaker as described. I'll desolder the board and use the tabs on the jacks as indicated in your diagram to re wire. The jacks mount directly to the plate via nut and washer so no worries there (the board has no support except the solder joints)

I'm looking to pick up a new matching cab in a couple weeks (the new cabs only have the one jack) to create a little micro stack so will hold off until then.

 

This little Orange micro dark has been a fun little piece of gear so far.

 

Thanks again for the help.

 

Johnny

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Guest Farnsbarns

This statement and sketch are VERY misleading. The statement, "assumes the board has been removed", needs to have the most important part added "AND DISCARDED".

 

And since it needs to be discarded, it further confuses the issue by using the PCB photo for the "new" wiring diagram. Also, since the board has been discarded and the jacks are "panel mount" (and PCB wired), they now have nothing to mount to or solder wires to.

 

This post is dangerously confusing and unclear.

 

I said lose the board, it couldn't have been clearer.

 

I didn't have a photo without the board because it hasn't been removed, obviously. I did write about 10 paragraphs very clearly saying the circuit board had to be romved. I was emphatic about that and I described the entire process very clearly as well.

 

If you can't solder wire to a pin, don't solder anything, pay someone.

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Guest Farnsbarns

Farns and Larry greatly appreciate the replies and cautions.

 

 

Farns

 

Yes they are switching jacks,yes red and black go back the the speaker as described. I'll desolder the board and use the tabs on the jacks as indicated in your diagram to re wire. The jacks mount directly to the plate via nut and washer so no worries there (the board has no support except the solder joints)

I'm looking to pick up a new matching cab in a couple weeks (the new cabs only have the one jack) to create a little micro stack so will hold off until then.

 

This little Orange micro dark has been a fun little piece of gear so far.

 

Thanks again for the help.

 

Johnny

 

No problem. Yes, I could see the jacks were panel mounted and the board was floating. It was obvious.

 

I'm sure you'll have no trouble soldering to the pins as long as this isn't your first attempt at soldering.

 

Oh, and the soldering iron gets hot. Don't burn yourself! :D

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No problem. Yes, I could see the jacks were panel mounted and the board was floating. It was obvious.

 

I'm sure you'll have no trouble soldering to the pins as long as this isn't your first attempt at soldering.

 

Oh, and the soldering iron gets hot. Don't burn yourself! :D

 

 

 

The soldering wont be a problem, burnt myself plenty of times already [crying] isn't that what they say...fingers are for burning, or cutting, or....

 

I'll post pics when the little micro stack is complete.

 

Johnny

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Guest Farnsbarns

The soldering wont be a problem, burnt myself plenty of times already [crying] isn't that what they say...fingers are for burning, or cutting, or....

 

I'll post pics when the little micro stack is complete.

 

Johnny

 

Look forward to it.

 

Do bare in mind that for a couple of £/$ you could buy some switching jacks with eyelets for those with lesser soldering skills.

 

Also, you might want to consider using a thick, single strand, and therefore somewhat rigid, wire for the connections I've done in blue. This could also solder to the pin between the two I've connected and the one over to the right, as per the track on the board. This would just prevent rotation of the panel mount jacks which could cause them to work loose. Just a thought.

 

Cheers!

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Guest Farnsbarns

Johnny 6 -

 

My advice would be to keep the old parts handy for when you decide to rewire it back to the way it used to be. Or if you need to sell it and you can't because you rewired it and you need to change it back. [thumbup]

 

I agree. Don't discard the board. You might want to use it again one day. You could even tape it securely inside the cab. BadBluesPlayer knows his shizzle BTW.

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I agree. Don't discard the board. You might want to use it again one day. You could even tape it securely inside the cab. BadBluesPlayer knows his shizzle BTW.

 

BBP and Farns;

 

 

 

LOL funny you guys mention that, but I usually keep everything much to the dismay of the Mrs. The tape inside the cab is a great idea! While I tend to keep everything I don't always know WHERE I kept it.

 

Thanks for the advice on the solid strand wire for parts or the job as well, I've lots of odds and sods of wire having around. I've repaired some traces in a board before (jump wires) so I don't imagine soldering to the pins will prove too much of a challenge.

 

 

I know BBP know's his stuff and there's you and a few other other guys I would trust with the technical stuff. I read the forum pretty much everyday even if I'm not posting.

 

Thanks again for taking the time to help me out.

 

Johnny

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