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leovan83

High Performance question

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As much as I look most of the features of the HP versions like the coil tapping, the ability to choose what each push pull can do, the heel joint, even the e-tuners... because it would be a very versatile recording guitar. But, I honestly don't like the way they look. I mean, I would much have them look just like the regular versions than the way they do, I don't like the big metal knobs, the truss rod cover or the metal pickup rings. It looks kinda "too much".

 

But, I guess I could do with all the chrome, but my question is this:

 

For any 2017 HP owners out there, wouldn't those metal pickup rings get corroded/stained pretty quick? I know most of the tailpieces on my LPs are somewhat stained, and I wipe them every time I'm done playing them. What do you think?

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If you like everything about them except the pickup rings and knobs, there is no real problem.

Just buy aftermarket replacement parts and change them. Throw the stock parts into the case or sell them.

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If you like everything about them except the pickup rings and knobs, there is no real problem.

Just buy aftermarket replacement parts and change them. Throw the stock parts into the case or sell them.

 

ditto. Those things are not a problem.

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I guess it doable for sure. The HsP would be great recording guitars for me, but I guess if I could only get one or the other, I'd go T, it just looks better.

 

[biggrin]

If looks did it, I’d be using an SG instead of a Les Paul. Come to think of it, I’d probably just have Rics instead.

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Lol! In my opinion, it all has to do with looks to an extent, otherwise we would be playing blocks of wood with no designs or colors.

 

That being said, when I think of Gibson the first hint that comes to my mind is a vintage looking guitar, a classic shape with classic appointments. I think the Hp series are great as a solution for the Gibson player who needs a do-it-all guitar for the studio, but I would be much more comfortable playing a classic looking LP with the nitrocellulose finish and the cream pickup rings etc hehe. If they made the HP versions to look pretty much the same as the T versions, loosing the extra chrome and stuff, I think it would be much better IMO.

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Like this? [biggrin]

 

bo-diddley-1959.jpg

 

Are you saying that the HPs dont have a nitro finish? [confused] I actually dislike nitro. It takes 2 years to cure, and after that it ages prematurely.

 

The HPs (mostly) are too bling-heavy to confine to a studio. Gibson reserve the higher grade maple caps for them for one thing. I also prefer the T looks but HPs must look good to someone?

Personally, if I was in the market for an LP, I would buy a HP and not bother with any aesthetic mods, other than to remove the pickguard (and then lose it).

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Before buying my first Gibson few days ago, I was researching forums and trying out various available models of LP and SG guitars (both Gibson and Epi) for good 8 months, and when it comes to playing, it didn't really matter T or HP, except that fast access heel was really making a difference for me. On the other hand upgrades on HP attracted me as something new, cause I respect tradition, but will personally always try something different. What was bothering me was proven failures with G-force and brass nut on 2015 line, but I was kind of thinking if Gibson still sticks to those for 2017, then they must have improved on lessons learned.

 

Finally I decided on 2017 Classic line simply because of looks (Green Ocean Burst color combined with all in chrome). Nothing more. If same color was available in Standard line, or some of the 2016 and even 2015 models I would pick those, although I now kind of like slightly heavier guitar feeling of Classic and the fact that it is brand new model.

 

I always failed to understand posts that "hated" HP upgrades, especially after 2015, when choice was available, and then again some things like G-force and even the nut are easily replacable if you don't like them. Or simply just buy T and ignore HP...

 

I was mostly concerned about quite a lot of complaints on Gibson QC lately and the fact I was ordering online from another country, however my experience is more than satisfactory and I happened to receive a great instrument.

 

Having it for few days now, I don't see myself buying T line over HP, now that I actually tried it.

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I think that the HP models will gain popularity as the new generation of players gradually replace us oldies. Gibson are trying to embrace the future (well, the present actually!) but we are holding them back. [flapper]

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Guest Farnsbarns

I think that the HP models will gain popularity as the new generation of players gradually replace us oldies. Gibson are trying to embrace the future (well, the present actually!) but we are holding them back. [flapper]

 

Most certainly this. If Gibson don't turn their backs on us 40-something-plus traditionalists they'll be left high and dry when we all die/retire/stop playing in old age. It makes no sense to pander to dying (literally or figuritivrly) market. Besides, when all the young players have become accustomed to robot tuning, flat, wide necks and phenolic resin fretboards the value of the old wooden manual instruments will plumit and we will still have a supply.

 

I say Gibson haven't gone nearly far enough into modernising the electric guitar. That's not to say I want them, I just recognise that Gibson have to chase the future.

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Merciful, the finish IS nitro on both the T and HP guitars, so no difference there.

 

Marin2112, don't get me wrong, actually, unlike your initial doubts about the HP line, I think I would love an HP over a T because of the exact features some people dislike. I would love the e-tuners, the coil tapping, the neck joint and the removable pickguard. That being said, I would use it as my "recording" Les Paul. My main and only issue is the fact that Gibson is a brand that has achieved a legendary image for almost all of their models and those images reflect specifically to classic and vintage looks. A Les Paul looks like a Les Paul because of all the specific little details that allow you and most people who don't even play guitar recognise a Les Paul: the pickguard, the fonts used, the specific colors, etc. Same with almost everybody Gibson model out there... it's an old and great guitar company, and the models they provide are the classic ones. If I wanted a super modern and high tech guitar I'd get a Strandberg or a Skerverssen, or even a Jackson or an Ibanez, ESP...

 

Most people who buy Gibson guitars or Fenders (both are probably the oldest and most iconic electric guitar makers) come looking for exactly that: the classic traditional looks. SURE, we love a better performing guitar (no matter if it looks old or high tech) and that's exactly what I was trying to say. I love the looks of a vintage muscle car but I wouldn't mind the reliability and tech of a new car. That being said, this is what I think:

 

Gibson would score a great achievement if they had the HP line and T line, look exactly the same. I mean "look", and by that I mean that both guitars look as good and classic as always except the HP part of things goes behind curtains like it should. Robot tuners and coil tapping? Of course! Just make sure they use the same kind of tubing pets so you can't really tell, no giant chrome knobs, pickup rings and truss rod cover that reminds you of the horrible Firebird X era of things... make the tapping happen with your trusted and correct looking top hats or speed knobs. Replacing the truss rod cover with a piece of metal saying "high performance" instead of the classic script fonts over a black background? Hell no! It's as iconic as the Gibson logo or the Les Paul logo. Might as well make the Gibson logo different, big block italic letters or something! See my point? I (and I think a whole lot of users) who are looking for a Les Paul not only because of its iconic sounds and feel but also because you really like the shape and looks (like all things in life), would buy a HP in a heart beat! I know I would choose a 2017 LP Classic Goldtop in HP if it looked exactly like the T version but with all the upgrades behind curtains, I'd gladly pay the extra 400 bucks, it's a much better guitar in every way, there's no denying that. Unfortunately it does come to looks some times, and sometimes you don't feel like having to buy replacement pickup rings and knobs and truss rod covers on a 2500 dollar guitar, maybe on a 1000 guitar...

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Merciful, the finish IS nitro on both the T and HP guitars, so no difference there.

 

Marin2112, don't get me wrong, actually, unlike your initial doubts about the HP line, I think I would love an HP over a T because of the exact features some people dislike. I would love the e-tuners, the coil tapping, the neck joint and the removable pickguard. That being said, I would use it as my "recording" Les Paul. My main and only issue is the fact that Gibson is a brand that has achieved a legendary image for almost all of their models and those images reflect specifically to classic and vintage looks. A Les Paul looks like a Les Paul because of all the specific little details that allow you and most people who don't even play guitar recognise a Les Paul: the pickguard, the fonts used, the specific colors, etc. Same with almost everybody Gibson model out there... it's an old and great guitar company, and the models they provide are the classic ones. If I wanted a super modern and high tech guitar I'd get a Strandberg or a Skerverssen, or even a Jackson or an Ibanez, ESP...

 

Most people who buy Gibson guitars or Fenders (both are probably the oldest and most iconic electric guitar makers) come looking for exactly that: the classic traditional looks. SURE, we love a better performing guitar (no matter if it looks old or high tech) and that's exactly what I was trying to say. I love the looks of a vintage muscle car but I wouldn't mind the reliability and tech of a new car. That being said, this is what I think:

 

Gibson would score a great achievement if they had the HP line and T line, look exactly the same. I mean "look", and by that I mean that both guitars look as good and classic as always except the HP part of things goes behind curtains like it should. Robot tuners and coil tapping? Of course! Just make sure they use the same kind of tubing pets so you can't really tell, no giant chrome knobs, pickup rings and truss rod cover that reminds you of the horrible Firebird X era of things... make the tapping happen with your trusted and correct looking top hats or speed knobs. Replacing the truss rod cover with a piece of metal saying "high performance" instead of the classic script fonts over a black background? Hell no! It's as iconic as the Gibson logo or the Les Paul logo. Might as well make the Gibson logo different, big block italic letters or something! See my point? I (and I think a whole lot of users) who are looking for a Les Paul not only because of its iconic sounds and feel but also because you really like the shape and looks (like all things in life), would buy a HP in a heart beat! I know I would choose a 2017 LP Classic Goldtop in HP if it looked exactly like the T version but with all the upgrades behind curtains, I'd gladly pay the extra 400 bucks, it's a much better guitar in every way, there's no denying that. Unfortunately it does come to looks some times, and sometimes you don't feel like having to buy replacement pickup rings and knobs and truss rod covers on a 2500 dollar guitar, maybe on a 1000 guitar...

 

Following the 2015 ‘experiment’ (for want of a better word) I think Gibson want to foster a quality distinction between HP and T. Even the ‘High Performance’ name is partly a challenge to the diehard traditionalists. It implies that by choosing a T model, they are not getting the best guitar they could.

 

Ok, that doesn’t cut much ice with most guys here. Their knowledge and experience is pretty extensive.

 

Even so, the HP higher price, premium AAAA caps and fancy cases all contribute to the perception of a superior instrument. I’m sure it’s quite deliberate.

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Getting back to the OPs question "won't the pickup rings tarnish?". I don't think they will as my understanding is that the hardware on the HP is chrome. Chrome does not tarnish like, silver, gold, or nickel does. And if it should you can polish it with chrome polish and not worry about the plating coming off. I have nickel on my 336, and gold on my LP and L5 and they all tarnish a lot. I am considering a new LP and one thing I like is the chrome plated metal parts. [thumbup]

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Following the 2015 'experiment' (for want of a better word) I think Gibson want to foster a quality distinction between HP and T. Even the 'High Performance' name is partly a challenge to the diehard traditionalists. It implies that by choosing a T model, they are not getting the best guitar they could.

 

Ok, that doesn't cut much ice with most guys here. Their knowledge and experience is pretty extensive.

 

Even so, the HP higher price, premium AAAA caps and fancy cases all contribute to the perception of a superior instrument. I'm sure it's quite deliberate.

 

 

I agree that it does seem that Gibson is trying to steer their market into a non-traditional direction. I believe there is a market for both, but I would like to see both lines on equal ground, but it probably never will be because Gibson is a for-profit company and they need to optimize their business (like any other business in any industry) but it does seem like the traditionalists are holding them back (me being one of them to some extent). But if that's what the market demands, they have to comply to some degree to make sales. It's a tricky balance for them.

 

(Wow, that was a lot of "buts", sorry about that.)

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