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chipss36

thermo treated woods in guitar

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Seems like this sympathetic guy primarily focus on electric guitars and the fortifying results of the torrefaction.

By that he kind of fails to hit this target-group, which obviously are about acoustic guitars and ditto sound(differences).

 

Still a competent voice on the scene - and some kind of an avantgardist too.

I for 1 am totally sure about the sonic effects of the baking. And like it quite a lot.

Several other members here are and do as well.

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Seems like this sympathetic guy primarily focus on electric guitars and the fortifying results of the torrefaction.

By that he kind of fails to hit this target-group, which obviously are about acoustic guitars and ditto sound(differences).

 

Still a competent voice on the scene - and some kind of an avantgardist too.

I for 1 am totally sure about the sonic effects of the baking. And like it quite a lot.

Several other members here are and do as well.

 

did you watch the whole thing? he spoke of 17th century violins, flutes, basses not on word electric guitar ? regardless, the science shown I find very interesting.

to each his own.

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did you watch the whole thing? he spoke of 17th century violins, flutes, basses not on word electric guitar ? regardless, the science shown I find very interesting.

to each his own.

No I didn't, it's fairly long - skipped my way forward and fell deeper into certain passages.

Fx where he worries/wonders about the woods 40 years from now, and the idea that the guitars should have frequencies blown at them during the process in the container.

Took the bass-talk as electrics, but missed the classical part. Will find it.

Yes, the lecture seems highly qualified.

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Here some cliff notes.

 

under an electron microscope,spruce thermo wood cells look like 17th century wood cells, they are open, in new wood the cells are closed.

The wood takes on less moisture, is more stable, is stiffer, resins crystalize, has a faster sound velocity, also weight reduces.

just like aging wood does over 50-60 years. it can be overdone, and if so breaks the cells. and with a wood plane is easy to spot.

 

all of this in pretty huge for an acoustic, even more so for a classical, with less sting tension to make sound, on the projection side anyway.

 

but the biggest part to me is its stable, even in thin pieces and over time.

 

glad to see Gibson giving it a shot, I just may pick up a J45V and see if its a keeper.

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Here some cliff notes.

 

under an electron microscope,spruce thermo wood cells look like 17th century wood cells, they are open, in new wood the cells are closed.

The wood takes on less moisture, is more stable, is stiffer, resins crystalize, has a faster sound velocity, also weight reduces.

just like aging wood does over 50-60 years. it can be overdone, and if so breaks the cells. and with a wood plane is easy to spot.

 

all of this in pretty huge for an acoustic, even more so for a classical, with less sting tension to make sound, on the projection side anyway.

 

but the biggest part to me is its stable, even in thin pieces and over time.

 

glad to see Gibson giving it a shot, I just may pick up a J45V and see if its a keeper.

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"glad to see Gibson giving it a shot, I just may pick up a J45V and see if its a keeper."

 

It (they) is (are).

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Well sure is pretty, build sure nailed it, much better than my j45tv.

I hated the pickguard placement on the tv, and a few other issues,so the tv was sold, like the darker burst much more, and one peice of wood for the fretboard and bridge.

I'll have to give it a week or so to report on sound. So far sounds just like well a j45....lol.

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did you watch the whole thing? he spoke of 17th century violins, flutes, basses not on word electric guitar ?

Gave it an extra shot, but still couldn't find the passage about old acoustic instruments (my fault, please give the time-mark).

 

But I also checked the guy's web-site and he primarily is an electric 6-string builder.

All okay, but that's the reason he doesn't really touch the subject we circulate around on these pages :

Being the acoustic timbre and the various differences between ordinary mint, real vintage and artificially aged guitars. Response, dryness, sustain, tone etc.

 

Mister Ruokangas isn't really sure if the torrefaction has any sonic effect and leans upon others (customers) when talking about it.

He's into the baking because of stability, especially of the necks. Again fair enough, and I'm not saying there isn't things about wood and torrefaction to be learned here.

 

Hope he'll develop into some acoustic work in the years to come. Not unrealistic.

Finland needs a qualified brand to take up the torch after Landola (my first western brand) has closed.

I'm sure Juha could do it ^

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