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Gibson LG1 Restoration slotted or unslotted pins


swngdncr

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Hello all, been working on restoration of mom's mid-60's LG1. Project has been on hold while hubby took over garage and workshop to build a wood strip Kayak. Getting back to it now and I am looking for thoughts on the bridge pins. The top was completely destroyed (by my brother who started the restoration 30 years ago). I had to make a new top, and I made a rosewood bridge to match the original plastic one. I'm not planning on selling it, and without the original top, it probably wouldn't be worth much anyway. So,I'm not sure how important it is to be "original" with the bridge pins. Certainly it would be easier to use slotted pins, which is what I assume was original. I don't have the original pins. So, would appreciate any suggestions/advice/input on whether which approach would be best for this project. Thanks in advance for your help. -cj-

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Slotted pins are the most common - those without slots wouldn't be appropriate to the originally installed Gibson LG-1 pins. There are folks on this board who have a preference for them, however, and they would be a good source of information to help you make a choice one way or the other. There are plenty of options available when it comes to the material used for pins - plastic, bone, horn, fossil ivory, and ebony come to mind as well as synthetics like Tusq. They all contribute to a guitar's tone in their own way(s), and your material of choice might be a factor in determining whether slots are necessary or not. Personally, I'd go with the slots to start. You can always refit for unslotted later if you so choose. By the way, I admire you for taking on a project of that size - let us know how it turns out!

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Use the slotted pins. If you need to get a better string break angle at some point, slot and ramp the pin holes slightly at the top of the bridge. Keep it traditional, even though it's new. Stewmac makes saws and files for this job, but since you've made a new top, you probably already knew that.

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I have a 52 LG1 that needs a neck reset but is just perfect for open tuning slide practice - light as a feather and sounds great, but everytime I mention it here, let me say the response is ...poor. Well I like it.

 

It has slotted ebony pins from Stewmac.

 

Can somebody explain the difference again? I got AA unslotted pins put in a couple of guitars recently and had the bridge ramped.....and I can't hear any difference. At All. Should have thrown my pesos out on the road.

 

(Oh yeah, my dad bought 2 timber kayak frames for my brother and I when we kids, covered one with canvas which was 15 feet long and christened Snoopy 2 and we took on the Great Southern Seas! Don't know what happened to the second one, must have sold it.)

 

 

BluesKing777.

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How 'original' it is has diff meanings to diff people. If your goal is to make it functional (playable) again, don't feel like you're out of bounds making some changes. I restored my 59' LG3 a few years ago and went through similar thoughts. There was no way mine could ever be made 'collectable' in the sense of vintage nostalgia or value, so playable was the goal while keeping enough of the mojo to identify it as the real thing.

 

I used slotted ebony bridge pins, Gotoh tuners (Klusons sux), refinished the mahog top, fixed broken braces, left the back/sides/neck alone, made new nut/saddle, and it turned out to my satisfaction. I think that's what should be most important is my 2c. best

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