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I love the Monkees -- next to the Archies, they're as pure bubblegum as you can get. Slamming the Monkees by comparing them to the Jonas Bros. raises interesting questions about people's quest for authenticity in pop music. But... pop music, by definition, is an ACT: contrived and synthesized so as to have mass appeal and make money for the record industry. The Beatles really are the same as the Jonas Bros, then -- only they realized they could catch more crumbs from the suits if they wrote their own material. By all accounts the Beatles were in it from the beginning for the money... not for art's sake. They idolized the Tin Pan Alley writers, Rogers & Hammerstein, etc.

 

"I'm Not Your Stepping Stone" is one of my favorites!! To me, part of its greatness is because of its unconventional angry edge. Not many tunes with this "F.U." vibe have INYSS's kind of staying power. The Beatles couldn't pull that one off... or were too mediocre/playing it safe to try, I don't know which.

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I was always, and still am, a Monkees fan. While everyone else was tripping out to the Beatles psychedelic era I was tapping my foot to the Monkee's melodies.

 

I wrote an extensive article on the Monkees for another guitarists website if your interested in some behind the scenes monkey business (pun intended).

 

http://www.stringdancer.net/cgi-bin/index.cgi?action=viewnews&id=159

 

One of the most interesting aspects of the Monkees was the list of heavy hitters that were involved in the production of their albums. Here's the "short" list of some names you might recognize.

 

Guitarists:

James Burton

Glen Campbell

Stephen Stills

Tommy Tedesco

Howard Roberts

Lowell George

Ry Cooder

David Crosby

Neil Young

 

Drums:

Jim Gordon

Buddy Miles

Dewey Martin

Dallas Taylor

Hal Blaine

 

 

Keyboards:

Billy Preston

Leon Russell

Neil Sedaka

Harry Nilsson

Dr. John

 

Horns, etc:

Jim Seals

Tom Scott

Jim Horn

Tim Weisberg

Conti Condoli

 

Background Vocals:

Neil Diamond

Bobby Sherman

 

Songwriters:

Gerry Goffin ' Carole King

Tommy Boyce ' Bobby Hart

Neil Diamond

Neil Sedaka ' Carol Bayer (Sager)

Harry Nilsson

Paul Williams

Michael Martin Murphey

Pete Seeger

Leiber/Stoller

Fred Neil

Antonio Carlos Jobim

Richie Valens

Barry Mann ' Cynthia Weil

David Gates

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Great Article L5Larry - good research too.

 

Jack Nicholson was a writer and appeared in a couple Monkees episodes. And its common knowledge Stephen Stills almost was a Monkee.

rare audition video:

 

No to hijack a thread - but the part at the end of your article about the Monkees producers moving on to make movies reminded me about how the profits from John Fogerty and CCR at Fantasy Records allowed Saul Zanetz to enter film production in partnership with Michael Douglas to produce "One flew over the cukoos nest"

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saul_Zaentz

 

The bulk of the reason John Fogerty perfoms old CCR tunes today after a 30+ year hiatus is because Saul Zaentz sold Fantasy records in 2005 - and John Fogerty resigned to the label.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Fogerty

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I actually got to meet them. My family and I were walking through our airport after just getting back from Disney World and found ourselves walking along with Davey Jones. He was headed to their show that night in Pittsburgh. We talked as we walked and he asked us if we wanted to go the show that night and he would leave tickets at the box office for the whole family. His assistant took our names and sure enough when we got there we had tickets plus backstage passes. It ended up being a pretty fun night but Dolenze actually was the most subdued. He really didn't seem to wanna be there but i guess that meet and greet stuff gets old after all these years. Davey and Peter went out of their way to talk to everyone and have pictures taken and even smile. I got all my old Monkees album covers from when I was young autographed.

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I always wondered who did the Spanish style picking on "Valerie".

http://www.tdpri.com/forum/bad-dog-cafe/107157-valerie-monkees.html

 

 

Its very much the "vibe" of Tommy Tedesco - but indeed it was session player

Louis Shelton

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louie_Shelton

 

http://www.louieshelton.com/

 

He's in Australia now

 

he also played the solo on "Last Train to Clarksville"

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I love the Monkees -- next to the Archies' date=' they're as pure bubblegum as you can get. Slamming the Monkees by comparing them to the Jonas Bros. raises interesting questions about people's quest for authenticity in pop music. But... pop music, by definition, is an ACT: contrived and synthesized so as to have mass appeal and make money for the record industry. The Beatles really are the same as the Jonas Bros, then -- only they realized they could catch more crumbs from the suits if they wrote their own material. By all accounts the Beatles were in it from the beginning for the money... not for art's sake. They idolized the Tin Pan Alley writers, Rogers & Hammerstein, etc.

 

"I'm Not Your Stepping Stone" is one of my favorites!! To me, part of its greatness is because of its unconventional angry edge. Not many tunes with this "F.U." vibe have INYSS's kind of staying power. The Beatles couldn't pull that one off... or were too mediocre/playing it safe to try, I don't know which.[/quote']

 

thats funny

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L5Larry...didn't Michael Nesmith actually play guitar as well? I know he had that Gretsch 12 string. The guy definitely later became a big name producer of videos and music. I know he wrote several of the Monkees songs and also wrote "Different Drum" that Linda Ronstadt did with the Stone Ponys.

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