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JuanCarlosVejar

Any 60's Everly Bros experts around?

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Folks,

 

I have heard so many bad thing about these guitars ...

And it's messing with my head as I have listened to various youtube videos of 63 and 64 Everly's over the years and find myself loving what I hear.

For having giant pickguards and straight bracing (I think) ...These are a maple lovers dream in my opinion.

 

 

 

A)Is anybody familiar with the internal structure of the Everlys?

B)Does anybody own a early vintage example?

C)If I ever got my hands on a 63 or 64 are they good candidates for a conversion to lefty (as far as the bracing pattern is concerned)

 

 

 

 

 

JC

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The Everly is the funky version of the J-185, and just as her predecessor she's also traditionally Gibson X-braced. As far as lefty conversions go, only the adjustable saddle with the strings anchoring through the bridge might be problematic if you wanted to keep that construction intact (given that the previous owner didn't already abandon it altogether). The sixties models (esp. 1962-64) had a slighter thinner body and are overall more desirable as vintage instruments. The handcrafted Ike versions of the Everly are probably the most desirable though. Ike Everly or not, it goes without saying that it's extremely rare to come by an opportunity to grab either one of these.

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I haven't heard anything negative about the vintage Gibson Everly model. I am curious what you may have heard.

 

Personally, they always seemed to have a coolness factor about them when I have seen some at vintage guitar shows.

 

Regarding converting one to a lefty, the only thing I see as maybe an issue is the angle of the bridge's saddle could affect intonation and probably should be replaced with a bridge with an angle that favors lefty playing. And, the nut should probably be replaced to favor lefty stringing. Just my opinion.

 

QM aka Jazzman Jeff

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I don't care for the pinless bridge construction as it relates to structural stability, but otherwise to my knowledge, a vintage Everly should be manufactured along similar lines to other Gibson flat tops from the same era.

 

As for focusing attention on adjustable bridges & large pickguards, I believe the emphasis is overrated. Yes, in theory it is reasonable to assume they will negatively impact resonance, but in practice, it seems that a stellar example of a given model will still shine through and produce it's unique & superior tone.

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I have an original 63 in black. For a guitar with huge pickguards (really thick too!), a pinless bridge, and a shallower body depth than traditional Gibson acoustics (including the J185) - you'd expect it to be lacking. In contrast, compared to other guitars I've owned and own (new and vintage Hummingbirds, J180s, J200, J160E, J100, Firebird acoustic, Dove), it sounds absolutely stellar.

 

To answer a couple of your questions - internally it's an X braced pattern (nothing unique going on). Also, the main aspects about converting to lefty would be the the bracing being reversed (not sure what that does to the sound) as well as the bridge. You would have to get one made - which is not difficult for a skilled luthier.

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A few years back I had a '63 in the house somebody I knew wanted to sell. It did have the cool factor going for it and I had no real issues with the guitar other than the standard Gibson neck profile from the period. But in the end it was one of those guitars I liked the idea of better than the guitar itself - especially given what the instrument cost.

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I have an original 63 in black. For a guitar with huge pickguards (really thick too!), a pinless bridge, and a shallower body depth than traditional Gibson acoustics (including the J185) - you'd expect it to be lacking. In contrast, compared to other guitars I've owned and own (new and vintage Hummingbirds, J180s, J200, J160E, J100, Firebird acoustic, Dove), it sounds absolutely stellar.

 

To answer a couple of your questions - internally it's an X braced pattern (nothing unique going on). Also, the main aspects about converting to lefty would be the the bracing being reversed (not sure what that does to the sound) as well as the bridge. You would have to get one made - which is not difficult for a skilled luthier.

 

 

Groova,

 

I don't want to put you through any trouble but as you might imagine ...Being a lefty a lot of times one has to live only on the fantasy of this or that vintage model.

 

 

Is there any chance you would be willing and able to take some pics of the inside of the top of your 63 EB ?

 

I would love to see what is underneath the hood

 

 

And if I may ask a second question I would be interested in you comparing the sound of the EB vs the Firebird Custom (these guitars also have a pretty stellar reputation)

 

 

Thanks to you and to everyone else for the thoughts

 

 

JC

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Not too familiar with the Everlys in the '60's, but they surely inspired me in '57 '58 & '59. Early recordings were with a Southern Jumbo or two and an early J 200. Naturally fame and endorsements of Gibson hyperbole made mucho money for them and "the real Gibson" back then. Gotta' say, I've never played a bad Gibson in my lifetime, some I've liked a tad better than others. One main thing about the "Great Everly" sound was, the late "Jimmy Day" playing the steel guitar on many of their recordings. This is not from reading countless stories, but from memory! have fun and enjoyment in your endeavor.

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Juan there was a thread awhile ago by a guy who was really into the Everly Brothers guitars.

He had one that was made by an independent well none builder, who built for the Everlys when they weren't with Gibson.

I searched the form, but couldn't find it. He seemed to have a lot of knowledge about the EB's and Gibsons.

I was hoping he would have hung around, and added to the other knowledgeable people here

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Juan there was a thread awhile ago by a guy who was really into the Everly Brothers guitars.

He had one that was made by an independent well none builder, who built for the Everlys when they weren't with Gibson.

I searched the form, but couldn't find it. He seemed to have a lot of knowledge about the EB's and Gibsons.

I was hoping he would have hung around, and added to the other knowledgeable people here

That's probably Billy, and this was his thread on the Everly guitars: http://forum.gibson.com/index.php?/topic/129324-photosgibson-j-180-and-steinegger-ike-everly-custom/page__p__1754405__hl__j-180__fromsearch__1#entry1754405

 

His take on the Everly was—and I'm of the same mind—that the Everly was conceived as a rhythm guitar for the stage meant to support the singer, not drown his vocals out, and in that sense the Everly was a great success for both Gibson as well as Steinegger. This also has to do with the recording tech used during the times of the Everly Brothers, where just a single microphone was hooked up to record both the artists' vocals and their guitars.

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Groova,

 

I don't want to put you through any trouble but as you might imagine ...Being a lefty a lot of times one has to live only on the fantasy of this or that vintage model.

 

 

Is there any chance you would be willing and able to take some pics of the inside of the top of your 63 EB ?

 

I would love to see what is underneath the hood

 

 

And if I may ask a second question I would be interested in you comparing the sound of the EB vs the Firebird Custom (these guitars also have a pretty stellar reputation)

 

 

Thanks to you and to everyone else for the thoughts

 

 

JC

 

No problem - will do. Sorry for the late response. I've been less frequent on these forums as I would like to be :(

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Here you go - was the best I could do. The x brace is before the bridge plate and you can then see the traditional braces that move diagonal from left (upper bout) to right (lower bout).

 

It's ok .I am a patient man for the most part!

 

 

Thanks

 

 

 

JC

post-48052-078791200 1491323766_thumb.jpg

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Here you go - was the best I could do. The x brace is before the bridge plate and you can then see the traditional braces that move diagonal from left (upper bout) to right (lower bout).

 

So non scalloped bracing???

 

 

The whole X cannot be seen but from what I can see it appears straight

 

 

Thanks again

 

JC

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So non scalloped bracing???

 

 

The whole X cannot be seen but from what I can see it appears straight

 

 

Thanks again

 

JC

 

Thats a Non scallop... Mine are the same ..

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Thats a Non scallop... Mine are the same ..

Slimt,

 

 

So you have a vintage EB?

 

 

If so mabe you could be willing to share some pics too.

 

As I said to Groove being a lefty I can only dream about these...

I have heard rumors that there's one 1963 lefty somewhere in the UK.

 

The bracing intereste me the most but any other pics you can spare would be very welcome !

 

 

Thanks

 

 

 

JC

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Slimt,

 

 

So you have a vintage EB?

 

 

If so mabe you could be willing to share some pics too.

 

As I said to Groove being a lefty I can only dream about these...

I have heard rumors that there's one 1963 lefty somewhere in the UK.

 

The bracing intereste me the most but any other pics you can spare would be very welcome !

 

 

Thanks

 

..

 

JC

 

 

Mine stay off camera...

 

Ive dwindled my stash down to where its Managable

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I believe they had scalloped bracing in some guitars out of the 40s and 50s, but by the 60s it was not a standard practice at Gibson.

 

So why not just get a righty and have a skilled luthier make a lefty bridge for it? I'm guessing it would be pretty straight forward if they had the original. As long as you kept the original, don't think it would have much impact on resale if that was a concern (as long as it's with hide glue).

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You know what,I think I am going to start saving up for one (I know they are not cheap) ... I always likes the way Cat Stevens made his sound.

And it''s probably the one guitar that is a prime candidate for conversion.

 

 

I appreciate your encouragement

 

 

 

JC

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Back in the late 60's when my wife was just my girlfriend (and I was just starting to play) we'd listen to her cousin who performed some and actually cut a couple records. He had a black Everly Brothers model. There was something about that black guitar with those big ol' tortoise pickguards - I LOVED it! Later I saw Eric Anderson with one on an album cover; too cool! I once asked that cousin about the guitar. He no longer had it, and said, "I wish I'd known how much you liked it; you could have had it!" Man, was I crushed! So I have nothing to add here except to say that I still think they're way cool, I never did own one, but I sorta almost came close, once... [sad]

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