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Gibson J45 Historic Collection


KeThomas91
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Hi guys, just to ask the members on their experience if any, of playing this particular model .Such a guitar has come up for sale right in my backyard as it were .Before arranging a viewing I would be interested in hearing the opinions of any current owners on the forum. As my next purchase will probably be my keeper, financially speaking, I would very much prefer a classic guitar such as the J45 with its short scale and nut width which is slightly proud of 1 11/16 ".Any advice/ insight very much appreciated !!

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I own one too. Great guitar imho. This was Gibsons only j-45 before they introduced the standard and the true vintage models. The HC is more like nowadays standard, with nicer cosmetics (at least for my taste; logo decal, white button tuners)

 

Some say the HCs are a little lighter build than todays standards, don't now if thats true, but they are definitely more like the standards build wise (Bracing etc.) Me thinks the nut is just a little smaller than on todays regular Gibsons.

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That was a great product demo. Outstanding example of how versatile the J45 is and the great tone. You should get an honorarium from Gibson. Or a free t-shirt.

 

I think I was in line for something until I tripped at the end with the big finale

 

I'm just pleased that a person made it to the end of my song 😂

 

I'll take a tshirt if one is going spare though

 

 

That'll sell more guitars than Tony polecastro and his beard ever did 😄

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The J45s coming from Bozeman are outstanding examples. The Historic should be no exception. If you don't have one you need one. The 'bursts vary,the 1.72 nut width is pretty consistent. The 24 3/4" scale is very addicting and is a real joy if you are used to longer scale. As with any handmade instrument, the tone from one to another can vary but many here can vouch for the overall. Not to be overlooked, a good one will get better with age and play. Good luck, hope it's a good one! Come back and share if you nab it.

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From what I have been able to learn through years of quietly looking around and listening, there were 670 J-45 Historic Collection guitars made for Guitar Center. These were essentially the plain old, standard version, generic J-45 as Gibson made them that year. Sitka spruce top, EIRW bridge and fingerboard, Tusq nut and saddle, Gotoh Kluson-clone tuners, Fishman Matrix Natural pickup, 20-fret fingerboard that (alas!) covers part of the rosette, which in turn is (along with the soundhole) closer to the neck because of Ren Ferguson's change of the bracing angle to 98 from 103 degrees or so, and a badly-placed pickguard that covers another quarter of the rosette. Mine has a nut width that is 1.704-in according to my Harbor Freight digital calipers.

 

The neck carve matches my memory of my 1960 LG-2, the tone is ENOUGH like my memory of my long-gone 1950 J-45, and it just feels like a nice old Gibson. Not, mind you, a specific Gibson from a specific year - but a generic "old" Gibson, or maybe a "traditional" Gibson. It has enough of the feel and the sound and the playability and it doesn't pretend to be a specific, moment-in-time snapshot. It's still ultimately about a playable guitar that references the past but has features and touches that reflect decades of refinement.

 

I love mine. I've owned a couple of hundred guitars and amps in my life, owned and played lots of nice old acoustics along the way, and this one satisfies me. Every time I pick up this guitar and play it, I am grateful to have it and enjoy it immensely. I love the way it sounds when I play it, I love the way it sounds when I play back recordings I have made with it. This is a keeper for me, and it has pretty much ended my search for flat top steel strings. It is my forever guitar.

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Hi guys, just to ask the members on their experience if any, of playing this particular model .Such a guitar has come up for sale right in my backyard as it were .Before arranging a viewing I would be interested in hearing the opinions of any current owners on the forum. As my next purchase will probably be my keeper, financially speaking, I would very much prefer a classic guitar such as the J45 with its short scale and nut width which is slightly proud of 1 11/16 ".Any advice/ insight very much appreciated !!

 

I bought mine new in 2006. She has opened up beautifully. The standard J-45 has Grover Rotomatic. These have the plastic Kluson type tuners The guitar sounds and plays like J45's I always remembered, and always wanted. My buddy has the Jackson Browne model -- stupid money for a guitar to my ears and hands isn't any better (or as good, really) than this one.

 

What I mean is that, the J45 Historic Collection is good enough that if you love it and play it often, she will grow into the guitar you are looking for.

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From what I have been able to learn through years of quietly looking around and listening, there were 670 J-45 Historic Collection guitars made for Guitar Center. These were essentially the plain old, standard version, generic J-45 as Gibson made them that year. Sitka spruce top, EIRW bridge and fingerboard, Tusq nut and saddle, Gotoh Kluson-clone tuners, Fishman Matrix Natural pickup, 20-fret fingerboard that (alas!) covers part of the rosette, which in turn is (along with the soundhole) closer to the neck because of Ren Ferguson's change of the bracing angle to 98 from 103 degrees or so, and a badly-placed pickguard that covers another quarter of the rosette. Mine has a nut width that is 1.704-in according to my Harbor Freight digital calipers.

 

The neck carve matches my memory of my 1960 LG-2, the tone is ENOUGH like my memory of my long-gone 1950 J-45, and it just feels like a nice old Gibson. Not, mind you, a specific Gibson from a specific year - but a generic "old" Gibson, or maybe a "traditional" Gibson. It has enough of the feel and the sound and the playability and it doesn't pretend to be a specific, moment-in-time snapshot. It's still ultimately about a playable guitar that references the past but has features and touches that reflect decades of refinement.

 

I love mine. I've owned a couple of hundred guitars and amps in my life, owned and played lots of nice old acoustics along the way, and this one satisfies me. Every time I pick up this guitar and play it, I am grateful to have it and enjoy it immensely. I love the way it sounds when I play it, I love the way it sounds when I play back recordings I have made with it. This is a keeper for me, and it has pretty much ended my search for flat top steel strings. It is my forever guitar.

 

I read this AFTER I wrote my response. This is better because you said what I wanted to say and with more detail. Yes, I own lots of guitars, but, except for my D-28, this is the one I have had the longest and will own until I die....

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My friend has a Historic Collection and it is one of the most decent, polite even courtly guitars I've ever played.

My own black sheep, , , , pardon, black nut Standard w. wrong mop logo and far too heavy Grover tuners, not to mention the misplaced pick-guard, is much stronger.

Provide more bass and generally seems almost masculine compared to the HC. Both are stellar slopes and none of us would disagree, , , or switch.

 

But 45's, , , , they came a long way so there are plenty of variations and personalities.

My 1953'er appears as an elegant lounge member where the 59'er is much straighter.

The 1950 I traded in for the 53'er was raw in comparison with each of those. Then again that was exactly what the guy missed in the one I got.

Is there a basic DNA for the voice and nature of these icons.

 

I think so, but wouldn't take the J-45 for 1 dimensional granted. The trail behind them is too long.

Same with the hog squares - apart from the fact that they have a shorter history thus don't grow roots all down the 50's and 40's.

 

Enjoy your search - and tell us what you found, , , and why. .

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