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Investment guitar


LarryUK

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Has anyone on here bought a guitar as an investment? I don't mean a 59 LP, just a mint one that will hopefully rise in price. I bought my Hamer Sunburst as a player, but it's mint and I don't want it damaged. It's 40 years old next year and I know it will appreciate in time. Hence I don't use it much. I've also found it a good excuse for a new one. 'it's an investment'.

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I haven't. But I bought my 2015 Les Paul Less+ because:

 

1/ It had dropped to half price (49%) by Sept of that year.

 

2/ It appeared in Sept 2017 that Gibson would abandon this spec of guitar. And I could imagine myself at some point in the future trying to find a 2015 Gibson.

 

Those 2 factors together made me buy. Rabs and I were exchanging messages about price fluctuations at the time. I bought the Less+ at about the right time. They began to rise in price again after a few days.

As for point 2/ Gibson did not continue with exactly the same spec, but HP models eventually started arriving.

 

I don't really consider myself a LP player. I dont use it as much as the ES-339 (bought early 2015), or other working guitars. So there was an 'element' of 'get it while you can' operating at the time.

 

If the despised 2015 Nashville guitars ever do become desirable in the future, I would only sell if I had too many guitars (I have too many right now :rolleyes: ). Meanwhile it will not stop me playing the Less+ out or using it like any other guitar.

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No, not really. For my 2 oldest guitars I bought the first (69 Epiphone) because I'd joined a band and it was super light weight which appealed to me for playing 3 sets as I'd had some back/neck issues. The second (61 Gibson MM) was very cheap and I thought it would be a good backup to the Epi as it was even lighter, same scale length etc. Turned out to be a bad idea as the pickup output volumes were so different that it didn't really work out. I still have both but rarely play them - they aren't collectible as they are modified/beat up and not particularly desirable models in the first place.

 

Though I never intended to make money on them, it did cross my mind that I should easily be able to get my money back if I didn't like them at least due to some people finding them old and 'interesting' but I can't imagine selling them unless I was desperate for a bit of cash - maybe give to my son, nephews or grandchildren if they are interested in future years or in my will.

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I haven't. But I bought my 2015 Les Paul Less+ because:

 

1/ It had dropped to half price (49%) by Sept of that year.

 

2/ It appeared in Sept 2017 that Gibson would abandon this spec of guitar. And I could imagine myself at some point in the future trying to find a 2015 Gibson.

 

Those 2 factors together made me buy. Rabs and I were exchanging messages about price fluctuations at the time. I bought the Less+ at about the right time. They began to rise in price again after a few days.

As for point 2/ Gibson did not continue with exactly the same spec, but HP models eventually started arriving.

 

I don't really consider myself a LP player. I dont use it as much as the ES-339 (bought early 2015), or other working guitars. So there was an 'element' of 'get it while you can' operating at the time.

 

If the despised 2015 Nashville guitars ever do become desirable in the future, I would only sell if I had too many guitars (I have too many right now :rolleyes: ). Meanwhile it will not stop me playing the Less+ out or using it like any other guitar.

After Christmas 2015, Amazon had a New Year sale. They had the 2015 Les Paul Classic for £700. I hesitated, but they sold out. I still think I should have had one. My Hamer Sunburst is mint and I do think they will appreciate in time.

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No.

 

In around 2008 I bought my '95 R0 in mint condition. It had spent it's life in a display case as part of a collection and was effectively unplayed. It's now my most 'chipped-n-dented' guitar as it gets almost all the playtime and is the one I always grab if I'm playing out anywhere be it at a friend's house or an open-mic night. I bought it for a good price and am never going to lose money on it but nor will it ever be worth a great deal in 'investment' terms.

 

In 1980 or thereabouts I bought an old, tired-looking, f-hole archtop (without a bridge) for £10. I thought it might make a slide guitar. With a bridge sourced it turned out to be unplayable as-was. Thirty years later it was made playable by a skilled luthier with imagination. A bit of detective work by some good souls here discovered the make and model. It's now, apparently, worth roughly £4k. It gets all the acoustic playtime and is well-worn.

 

I can, absolutely, see the point of buying as an investment but having a guitar too precious to play is not really my idea of fun.

 

Pip.

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No, your guitar might increase in value but it may not be anything considerable, that is if it does appreciate at all.

 

Sometimes a never-played guitar provokes questions as to its playability.

 

If I was looking for an investment a stock index fund is the way to go, you will not beat it.

 

A pristine guitar is a conversation piece, maybe good for bragging rights but half the people maybe impressed and the other think the guitar should be played.

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1492847305[/url]' post='1850807']

Has anyone on here bought a guitar as an investment? I don't mean a 59 LP, just a mint one that will hopefully rise in price. I bought my Hamer Sunburst as a player, but it's mint and I don't want it damaged. It's 40 years old next year and I know it will appreciate in time. Hence I don't use it much. I've also found it a good excuse for a new one. 'it's an investment'.

 

Just bought an all rosewood custom shop telecaster for that reason. Most of the guitars I have are out of production models,some I only play very little. Are they good investments? Time will tell.

 

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The market is utterly flooded with guitars of all kinds. "Limited Editions" are only limited until they are produced again. Even high end guitars are not a good investment, they are too expensive to begin with.

 

Save for guitars like the Page LP reissue and things along those lines I do not see a modern guitar appreciating in value.

 

You know what would be a fun experiment? place an investment into an Stock Index Fund with a low fee like VTI (in the USA) buy stock for the same exact amount you paid for a guitar. See which wins. Granted you can play a guitar in the meantime but maybe you are not planning to play it since it is an investment.

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Never! I buy them, because I love them, and love playing them. I DO take care of them, as well.

But, I'd never leave one to "Case Queen" status, in the off chance that it might go up, in "value."

A lot of my guitars have gone up, in value...some, significantly! But, that's luck/good fortune,

not intent.

 

In some circles, the well played (AKA honest relic'd) versions are perceived as more "valuable"

simply because they were well played, and well loved, more than the "pristine" case queens.

 

It's a fickle industry, anyway, subject to fads and/or "who" (celebrity rock star) plays what. Which,

I've never fully understood, because unless the model in question was THEIR guitar, what does them

playing that model really mean, value wise, to any of us? It's not like we're going to be suddenly

imbued with their talent, etc. The Epi "Casino" is just one, of many, examples! If The Beatles had

not started playing those Casino's, would they have the life, and "mojo" they now enjoy???! That whole

concept is just "Weird," to me. I do understand it, on some level, but, it's still strange.

But, as always, that's just Me!

 

CB

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...and I know it will appreciate in time.

You are assuming that guitars will still be desirable in future. Fewer and fewer kids are getting into guitar and rock has been dead for a while now. Unless a new guitar god the likes of Randy Rhoads or Slash comes along boasting Hamer sunburst and spawns a new generation of guitar players, be happy to get your money back when you do sell it. You're right that guitars are investments, just not financial investments.

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I never bought one intentionally as an investment - though over the years, I have had quite a few that I sold or traded for more than I paid for them. I bought a goldtop LP in 1970 for $300 and in about '95 traded it for a brand new ES175. Not a good trade as I gave the 175 up after about a year and sometimes still wish I the old Lester.

 

I may (or may not) have bought one that will turn out to be an investment by chance. I bought one of the early Taylor Solid Body Customs in '08. The solid bodies didn't sell that well for Taylor and by 2010 or so they discontinued the Custom model. In 2013 they discontinued the entire solid body line. It is an excellent guitar, but since it never gained popularity nor was it played by any huge rock guitar gods, I don't know if it will go up in value or not. It wasn't cheap (around $3K)to begin but maybe if I found the right person who was a huge Taylor fan and wanted a solid body I could get more than I paid for it just because there aren't that many around :( [confused]

 

Uh-oh just did quick check on Reverb for used Taylor SB Customs, they are being offered from between $1300 to $1800 so have lost about 50% of their original retail. I bought it to play, and so far it looks like a poor investment. Might not live long enough to see it go up in value [scared]

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I will buy super cheap guitars off Craigslist and flip them after fixing them up but I don't buy guitars for investments. Guitars I buy for me I buy because I love guitars and am fascinated with them. I have played all of my guitars at one point or another and swap out what is on display in my music room periodically.

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It's absurd unless you have so much $ that you really don't need further investments. By the time a guitar bought new appreciates to any significant degree (or not) most of your life will have gone by. The guitars I've accumulated that may have appreciated are, to my mind, lucky accidents - and the joy of playing 'em far outweighs the financial gamble.

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i think the idea of a guitar as an investment is not a good one.

there are better ways of investing.

besides, as the boomers die off, so will the market.

most kids today aren't listening to guitar driven music. rock is nearing the end of it's reign.

change is inevitable.

Speaking as an acoustic player/not a rocker even in markets that would survive the situation you forecast, guys with cash to spend are more likely to be looking for players than closet queens. Wonderful to play and enjoy - bad investment!

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I've never bought one specifically as an investment. I have bought a few that I knew I could get my money back from if I sold them. Sometimes that worked, and sometimes I took a loss anyway. As I recall, I made a bit on a Gibson semi-hollow and a Les Paul, lost my a$$ on a high-end Strat, and broke even on a couple more.

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