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Have an annoying scratch on my j45

Will this stuff make the guitar explode or anything ?

 

95DBC938-0D8A-4133-8F87-C237F34A079F.jpg

 

I've used it in the past to touch up a couple of chips on my Guild 12 string. Use tiny drops and let it spread into the chip until you get a flat suface.

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Honestly, unless you can touch it up with the point of a needle I fear you'll notice the touch-up more than the scratch.

 

I doubt that.

The scratch is all I see

The guitars not pristine , and I don't worry about that but it's such a shitty scratch

 

I'll take a pic when I get home

I kinda new I'd have to use a pinhead or something

Any advice will be appreciated

 

Thanks lads

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I doubt that.

The scratch is all I see

The guitars not pristine , and I don't worry about that but it's such a shitty scratch

 

I'll take a pic when I get home

I kinda new I'd have to use a pinhead or something

Any advice will be appreciated

 

Thanks lads

I used a 0000 paint brush that I used to use for retouching black and white photographs.

A pair of magnifying specs can be helpful.

Dab it on in tiny spots. Don't use a painting motion or it will be obvious.

Like most jobs, it's worth taking your time.

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ouch!

 

that area is not really ALL black Stu.. Have you tried to use some scratch remover first?

 

There's a few different ones you can try, (meguire's scratch x believe it or not, may help..)

 

There are some products made JUST for guitars tho. maybe you'd feel better using one of those?

just a quick google turns up some stiff like this: https://www.guitarscratchremover.com/

 

I think the Black paint will stick out a bit more than you'd like.

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I've tried all polishes

Think I'm making it whiter by using them

 

If it was a straight line I'd leave it as it might look like player wear

But it's so odd , and I honestly don't know how it got there.

All I can think of is changing strings and some weird circumstance with the end of a thin string did it. Because it's such a weird shape

 

I seriously hate it . Think I'd rather have a black line that I could remember doing 😄

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I've tried all polishes

Think I'm making it whiter by using them

 

If it was a straight line I'd leave it as it might look like player wear

But it's so odd , and I honestly don't know how it got there.

All I can think of is changing strings and some weird circumstance with the end of a thin string did it. Because it's such a weird shape

 

I seriously hate it . Think I'd rather have a black line that I could remember doing ��

 

watch this: https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?fr=yhs-mozilla-001&hsimp=yhs-001&hspart=mozilla&p=guitar+scratch+remover#id=3&vid=7ccdb3bdb5a973c0b226268f81801ee8&action=click

 

Case Latch??

 

Seriously, check this link: https://www.guitarscratchremover.com/

 

 

there is one example looks like yours.. if you can believe the photos... it worked in that case.

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watch this: https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?fr=yhs-mozilla-001&hsimp=yhs-001&hspart=mozilla&p=guitar+scratch+remover#id=3&vid=7ccdb3bdb5a973c0b226268f81801ee8&action=click

 

Case Latch??

 

Seriously, check this link: https://www.guitarscratchremover.com/

 

 

there is one example looks like yours.. if you can believe the photos... it worked in that case.

 

 

That's reminding me of the middle of the night adverts where they set for to car bonnets

 

'Wow I can't believe it's the same car !!'

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OOopps, , , that scratch isn't the right kind of scratch.

 

Have you considered one of those water-resistant ultra thin black felt pens. Easy to steer and very discrete.

 

I would start there.

 

 

Really ?

I thought they would stick out like a sore thumb due to the difference in ink ??

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Honestly, unless you can touch it up with the point of a needle I fear you'll notice the touch-up more than the scratch.

 

Depending on where it is on the guitar, I'll agree. If you're that worried about a scratch I'd take it to someone who knows what they doing, otherwise it could end up looking worse than the scratch itself, like a poor cover-up job of a bad tattoo!

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Depending on where it is on the guitar, I'll agree. If you're that worried about a scratch I'd take it to someone who knows what they doing, otherwise it could end up looking worse than the scratch itself, like a poor cover-up job of a bad tattoo!

 

 

That's my thought as well. An experienced luthier or repair tech might thin some lacquer way down, and depending on how the far into or through the finish the scratch has gone, drop fill or overspray slightly, then buff it down.

 

It's magic what an experienced guy could do with this, probably at reasonable cost.

 

In any case, the first thing is to get all the polish residue out of that scratch. I've had reasonable success using cotton swabs (Q-tips) and naphtha, but it will take a bit of effort and patience to get it out.

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I have a trick that could work. I have used my kids WATER based wide tip drawing pens to make all kinds of small scratches and marks disappear. I use them on my guitars and lacquered furniture etc. Buy a full color pen set at the kids store and pick the closest color. Use the pen right on top of the scratch, then wipe the excess off with a damp cloth.

 

Just make sure you go to the kids store and get water based pens. Alcohol based will melt the finish. As long as the pens are water based, you can do no damage.

 

I have even used this trick on my old 1942 Banner. J-45. I can not even find the touch up spots now.

 

Lars

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Thanks Davy.

 

88A2D286-AE06-4329-9A82-2CA7270F1A60_1.jpg

 

It's a doozy

 

Thats nothing. Honestly I'd just live with it. Over time it will get dirty and just become part of the character of the guitar. Like I mentioned above, if that scratch annoys you, a bad repair will annoy you even more. Take it to a pro. You paid a lot of money for that guitar, don't cheap out and do it yourself to save money unless you know what your doing. I do a lot of work on my own guitars (set ups, cut my own nuts when I'm not lazy, have made saddles form blanks including slotted saddles for my AJ), but know when the work at hand requires a real pro.

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My pristine black car hood got a dozen paint chips from an idiot gravel truck driver that didn't close his back flap scoop all the way. Marble sized gravel at 70 mph does wonders. Also put a dent in my windshield. I cleaned each one real well so the paint would adhere. There were no dents, just gray spots the size of the dot over the "i" on the Gibson logo on our headstocks. I used a toothpick to put a small drop in each one and waited to see if it would slowly sink and level out to fill in the pockmark. If it didn't, I wiped it clean with paint thinner and tried again. A few days later, I went over them with the meguiers Scratch x to polish out and blend in any imperfections. Be sure your paint is thin and fluid so it will seep into the scratch. As was suggested, a small needle or pin might be the best "brush". I agree, that scratch would drive me to distraction. A black line, if done right will be less noticeable. Since the paint color and gloss won't be an identical match, the trick is to only use it to fill in the scratch. It might be possible to fill it in slightly over filled, and wipe off the excess only with a naphtha damp rag. G'Luck!

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Really ?

I thought they would stick out like a sore thumb due to the difference in ink ??

 

I've tried different methods over the years - primarily on vintage tops and headstocks.

Both cellulose gloss paint and oil paint in the the right blends. Sometimes even aquarel-color and as said felt pen.

 

This scratch is hyper thin and the risk you'ld fumble a clumsy retouche forward with the brush is present.

Of course I know nothing 'bout your fine-painting-skills, but U see what I mean.

 

Make the pen step 1 and buff it down. See how it turns out - might reflect differently from different angles in certain lightings, but it's worth a try.

If it doesn't work, go Northwest with a horse hair. You might have a miracle cure there if your hands can handle it.

 

Let us hear'n'see what happens. Quite exciting procedure ahead. And NO, , , I personally wouldn't let that paper-clip-like ding-thing get away with it.

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My pristine black car hood got a dozen paint chips from an idiot gravel truck driver that didn't close his back flap scoop all the way. Marble sized gravel at 70 mph does wonders. Also put a dent in my windshield. I cleaned each one real well so the paint would adhere. There were no dents, just gray spots the size of the dot over the "i" on the Gibson logo on our headstocks. I used a toothpick to put a small drop in each one and waited to see if it would slowly sink and level out to fill in the pockmark. If it didn't, I wiped it clean with paint thinner and tried again. A few days later, I went over them with the meguiers Scratch x to polish out and blend in any imperfections. Be sure your paint is thin and fluid so it will seep into the scratch. As was suggested, a small needle or pin might be the best "brush". I agree, that scratch would drive me to distraction. A black line, if done right will be less noticeable. Since the paint color and gloss won't be an identical match, the trick is to only use it to fill in the scratch. It might be possible to fill it in slightly over filled, and wipe off the excess only with a naphtha damp rag. G'Luck!

 

How did you "dent" your windshield?! I'll never own a black car. Way too much work to care for a black finish and if you don't keep up on it, it will start looking like crap pretty darn fast after you drive off the lot.

 

Scratch X is awesome for polishing guitars to get rid of light swirls, small surface scratches, etc. I've used it on Gibson Nitro finishes and it's great.

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. . . but it's so odd , and I honestly don't know how it got there.

 

Mr Woodford probably knows what happened.

 

 

Have you considered these lacquer pens?

 

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The above is only a screen capture. Scroll down on the link below; Stew Mac has brown and black as well. Maybe try a hobby shop first to get around Stew Mac's notoriou$ mark up.

 

http://www.stewmac.com/Materials_and_Supplies/Finishing_Supplies/Colors_and_Tints_and_Stains/ColorTone_Touch-up_Marker.html

 

The narrow width of the scratch gives you a good chance of making it much less noticeable. Lacquer's strong suit is it's workability. You could follow up the touch up with Virtuoso Cleaner, then V. Polish.

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I've used the pens - they get my vote.

The Stew-Mac pens have a big fat tip, and when you press down to release the paint, it can come flying out in a blob.

 

I've used them by dripping it into a plastic cup & then applying with a fine point brush or micro sponge.

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