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Like New '64


NCtom

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I looked at and played a "new" '64 B-25 yesterday a shop in Virginia. Except for a few dings and some shopwear, the guitar positively glowed with the appearance of a brand new guitar.

 

The story was that a woman's parents had bought it for her and she never learned to play, so it sat for the past 45 years unused in any way. At first I thought that it must be a refinish, but there were no signs of previous wear. Even the tuners wre still bright and white. It had all the desirable characteristics, the neck wasn't too slim, the bridge was rosewood with a nonadjustable saddle, and tone, while not yet broken in, that was relatively loud and full. Even the insides were bright and clean. I didn't see the case, but the shop owner said it was clean as the guitar.

 

I left it reluctantly, since I just turned 65 myself and have more guitars than my wife knows what to do with. I sure would have loved to brought it home with me, though, and broken it in.

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I left it reluctantly, since I just turned 65 myself and have more guitars than my wife knows what to do with. I sure would have loved to brought it home with me, though, and broken it in.

 

 

If the price was right and money is not a real issue, walking away may have been a mistake. Just because you've turned 65 doesn't mean you should stop buying guitars, if it's one that really speaks to you.

 

What are you saving it for? Enjoy life while you can. (And I'm 70, so I get to say that.)

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If the price was right and money is not a real issue, walking away may have been a mistake. Just because you've turned 65 doesn't mean you should stop buying guitars, if it's one that really speaks to you.

 

What are you saving it for? Enjoy life while you can. (And I'm 70, so I get to say that.)

 

And, I'm close to that. So, I get to second it!

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Always felt the giant thick p'guard stifled and dampened the tone too much, especially since was supposed to replace the LG2, a woody but lively gem. Just another Gibson flub, like ladder bracing. I got rid of both of my B25s.

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Cameleye, what would be the year for wooden bridge/nonadjustable saddle?

 

At 65 I'm not giving up, just willing to sit out this round with SWMBO. If I hadn't just bought a Republic resonator last week I might be willing to try it with her.

 

Also, the shop was asking around $1800, but I didn't ask what would take it.

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On B-25s, the first plastic bridges show up in 1963.

 

The guitar you looked at is most likely a '62 (first year of the B-25), or an early '63.

 

Although it may be early enough to have the thinner pickguard, the thick pickguard is still no big deal to me. These instruments can be every bit as good as the LG-2 that preceded it (in this case, by just a year). If it sounds good, it is good - and some of them can tonally be stellar.

 

As for the asking price, you are talking about the most desirable of all B-25s, in pristine condition. Think of what an LG-2 in pristine condition would run. Imho, $1800 is at the higher end of the scale, but not unwarranted if this B-25 has got the tone, and is truly as clean as you say (with no structural issues).

 

If it meets all the critical criteria, it really is a rather rare bird.

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Another lucky 'old guy' on board☺ The B-25 is a pretty decent little guitar, at least the only ones I didn't like showed up with the downward bridge in the late 60's. Count me in the camp that dislikes the super-thick batwing guards. Many of us just removed 'em back in the day; they were applied over the finish, so no big deal; some folks replaced theirs with more sound/volume-friendly plastic and some didn't. As far as the plastic bridge goes, you're more likely to find them that way than with the wooden variety, but remember we're in Gibsonland and both were used. 1965 was the 'official' year for plastic. As far as I'm aware, natural tops were available as early as 1962 when the model was allegedly introduced.

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Gibson being Gibson, I suppose it could be a '62, then. I was just relaying what was told to me. I'm not sure I care for all this talk about being old, though.

 

I have looked at a lot of guitars and I was struck by this one. Sure, $1800 is no bargain, but feel like it was a reasonable place to start with a 9+ example of a rather rare bird. I've

never been a particular fan of the B-series, but I can't say I care much for the LG's either. I guess I'll keep my opinions and finds to myself from now on.

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A quick search shows prices range for B25s anywhere from $1k to $2k. So, $1800 for a B25 in excellent shape is not a bad price. The fact it has the original chipboard case in pristine shape is a strong clue the guitar is a much desired 'closet queen' and not some form of trickery.

And, thick pick guards and plastic bridges are not deal breakers for most people interested in vintage. Far from being expert - it's my recollection most Gibson's contemporary with this B25 had thick pick guards.

(You don't have to take them off. Eventually, the glue dries up and they fall off on their own. )

This sounds like a great find. Realize there will always be some on any internet forum who will squeeze a few sour grapes into your vintage wine.

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A quick search shows prices range for B25s anywhere from $1k to $2k. So, $1800 for a B25 in excellent shape is not a bad price. The fact it has the original chipboard case in pristine shape is a strong clue the guitar is a much desired 'closet queen' and not some form of trickery.

And, thick pick guards and plastic bridges are not deal breakers for most people interested in vintage. Far from being expert - it's my recollection most Gibson's contemporary with this B25 had thick pick guards.

(You don't have to take them off. Eventually, the glue dries up and they fall off on their own. )

This sounds like a great find. Realize there will always be some on any internet forum who will squeeze a few sour grapes into your vintage wine.

Can't recall the last time I let someone's opinion influence an instrument purchase in a negative way.

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