Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Cleaning


AndyK

Recommended Posts

If legend is correct, James Jamerson never cleaned his bass or replaced the strings (unless one broke).

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Jamerson

 

"James Jamerson used La Bella heavy-gauge (.052–.110) flatwound strings which were never replaced, unless a string broke. He did not particularly take care of the instrument, as he stated: "The gunk keeps the funk", and it is possible that the neck eventually warped, as many claimed it impossible to play."

 

Why clean it? Wipe it down with one of those soft guitar cloths and forget it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't use mineral spirits.

 

Here's what I do when it's time to make my guitars or basses shine like a new penny:

 

1. First you remove the strings.

 

2. Then you polish the frets with Brasso or any available metal polish. I like to use an old, soft terrycloth rag for this job.

 

3. Buff the neck really good afterwards, front and back, with a quality guitar polish.

 

4. Next, remove the bridge and all metal bits, and polish them with a good chrome polish like Blue Magic.

If they aren't too corroded, you can polish them without removing 'em.

 

5. Then, soak any spots that had stickers, or other areas with blemishes, with WD-40. Gently buff off any old sticker residue with the WD-40 and a soft terry cloth.

 

6. Polish the tuning keys and machine heads with the blue magic. Take your time, this is very detailed work.

 

7. Apply some electrical contact cleaner to a q-tip, and gently swab out the electrical jack where your guitar cord plugs in. This will help to improve contact when the guitar is plugged into your amplifier.

 

8. If you had previously heard a scratchy, crackling noise when turning your volume and tone knobs, remove the cover plate/pick-guard, and find the electrical pots that the knobs are connected to. Spritz some of the electrical contact cleaner/lubricant (I like De-Ox-It) into the small apertures in the pots, and roll the knobs left and right for about a minute. This will remove the noise later on.

 

9. Re-attach the pick-guard and all the bridge bits.

 

10. Lastly, wax the entire guitar down from head to toe with Turtle Wax, or some other automotive carnuba wax. Buff all the wax off a bit later with a soft terry cloth towel or a cotton bandana.

 

11. Re-string her with brand-new strings, tune her up, and your lad's bass guitar will look (and feel) like brand new!

 

 

:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

5. Then, soak any spots that had stickers, or other areas with blemishes, with WD-40. Gently buff off any old sticker residue with the WD-40 and a soft terry cloth.

 

 

Aha! Thank you, sparquelito. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't use mineral spirits.

 

Here's what I do when it's time to make my guitars or basses shine like a new penny:

 

1. First you remove the strings.

 

2. Then you polish the frets with Brasso or any available metal polish. I like to use an old, soft terrycloth rag for this job.

 

3. Buff the neck really good afterwards, front and back, with a quality guitar polish.

 

4. Next, remove the bridge and all metal bits, and polish them with a good chrome polish like Blue Magic.

If they aren't too corroded, you can polish them without removing 'em.

 

5. Then, soak any spots that had stickers, or other areas with blemishes, with WD-40. Gently buff off any old sticker residue with the WD-40 and a soft terry cloth.

 

6. Polish the tuning keys and machine heads with the blue magic. Take your time, this is very detailed work.

 

7. Apply some electrical contact cleaner to a q-tip, and gently swab out the electrical jack where your guitar cord plugs in. This will help to improve contact when the guitar is plugged into your amplifier.

 

8. If you had previously heard a scratchy, crackling noise when turning your volume and tone knobs, remove the cover plate/pick-guard, and find the electrical pots that the knobs are connected to. Spritz some of the electrical contact cleaner/lubricant (I like De-Ox-It) into the small apertures in the pots, and roll the knobs left and right for about a minute. This will remove the noise later on.

 

9. Re-attach the pick-guard and all the bridge bits.

 

10. Lastly, wax the entire guitar down from head to toe with Turtle Wax, or some other automotive carnuba wax. Buff all the wax off a bit later with a soft terry cloth towel or a cotton bandana.

 

11. Re-string her with brand-new strings, tune her up, and your lad's bass guitar will look (and feel) like brand new!

 

 

:)

 

Screw that! Just buy another one ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't use mineral spirits.

 

Here's what I do when it's time to make my guitars or basses shine like a new penny:

 

1. First you remove the strings.

 

2. Then you polish the frets with Brasso or any available metal polish. I like to use an old, soft terrycloth rag for this job.

 

3. Buff the neck really good afterwards, front and back, with a quality guitar polish.

 

4. Next, remove the bridge and all metal bits, and polish them with a good chrome polish like Blue Magic.

If they aren't too corroded, you can polish them without removing 'em.

 

5. Then, soak any spots that had stickers, or other areas with blemishes, with WD-40. Gently buff off any old sticker residue with the WD-40 and a soft terry cloth.

 

6. Polish the tuning keys and machine heads with the blue magic. Take your time, this is very detailed work.

 

7. Apply some electrical contact cleaner to a q-tip, and gently swab out the electrical jack where your guitar cord plugs in. This will help to improve contact when the guitar is plugged into your amplifier.

 

8. If you had previously heard a scratchy, crackling noise when turning your volume and tone knobs, remove the cover plate/pick-guard, and find the electrical pots that the knobs are connected to. Spritz some of the electrical contact cleaner/lubricant (I like De-Ox-It) into the small apertures in the pots, and roll the knobs left and right for about a minute. This will remove the noise later on.

 

9. Re-attach the pick-guard and all the bridge bits.

 

10. Lastly, wax the entire guitar down from head to toe with Turtle Wax, or some other automotive carnuba wax. Buff all the wax off a bit later with a soft terry cloth towel or a cotton bandana.

 

11. Re-string her with brand-new strings, tune her up, and your lad's bass guitar will look (and feel) like brand new!

 

 

:)

 

Since you mentioned "Turtle Wax" I assume this whole list is satire? I wouldn't put Turtle Wax on my granddaughter's tricycle much less one of my guitars!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10. Lastly, wax the entire guitar down from head to toe with Turtle Wax, or some other automotive carnuba wax. Buff all the wax off a bit later with a soft terry cloth towel or a cotton bandana.

 

Turtle Wax...now, that's funny. I didn't notice that because I never got that far before I I realized I would never go through that much trouble to clean a guitar. As merciful-evens said: "Screw that, just buy another guitar."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since you mentioned "Turtle Wax" I assume this whole list is satire? I wouldn't put Turtle Wax on my granddaughter's tricycle much less one of my guitars!

 

Not satire.

 

I have kept my guitars in great shape this way for many, many years.

 

Carnauba wax works great on any number of painted finishes, though the spray-on waxes are fast becoming my favorite, simply because they are easy, and you don't have to worry about caked-on residue.

 

 

Why are you opposed to the use of hard paste waxes on your guitar's finishes by the way?

Is there a negative association to the brand 'Turtle Wax' in your local scene?

 

Just curious.

 

[mellow]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I once met a young (20 something) Japanese kid, who had a Gibson LP Standard, in Vintage burst,

that was the filthiest LP I'd ever seen. It didn't appear to have any real "damage," or finish

checking, etc. And, it was a fairly recent model, a that time...I.E. Not "Vintage," etc. So...

I ask him: "Do you even clean your guitar??!" He laughed, and said: "NO...NEVER!!" I asked him

"Why?" He said, rather proudly: "This way NO ONE asks, or wants to play MY guitar, but ME!" [biggrin]

Plus, he obviously loved the "look," as it was. :rolleyes:

 

So...whatever floats your boat, I guess? [unsure][biggrin]

 

 

CB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...