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JAF

First time owner of an Epiphone.

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Hello. New on the forum and first time owner of an Epiphone G-400 Pro. I bought it (I think it is second hand, from a retailer) but looks brand new. Except some of the plastic was removed. I also didn't get anything else but the guitar.

I'm not sure but the serial number checked out fine. It was made in 2015 according to the Epiphone serial checker.

 

I love the guitar and its abilities. I have one worry though. It has produce terrible fret noise mostly on the low E-string. I looked around the web to see but all I found made me even more confused. Some sites said I should adjust the truss rod and some said I should adjust the bridge. The neck looks fairly strait to me (that means I cannot see if it is being curved either ways).

 

So if the neck is optimal, what should I do to get higher action? The action on the guitar now is really low. Its almost slinking along the neck.

 

A picture of the guitar if you click on the link. Couldn't figure out how to link it directly in the thread. Just got a warning that I'm not allowed to use [/img] on this board.

 

http://imgur.com/a/jTnUK

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Looking at the bridge from above, there are two screws. One either side of the saddles that the strings go over.

 

To raise the action, turn the screw anti-clockwise. Try the one next to the low E string first. That might be all it needs.

 

Let us know how it goes.

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To raise the action, turn the screw anti-clockwise. Try the one next to the low E string first. That might be all it needs.

 

 

I shouldn't raise both screws? I am quite new to the guitar world as I have just played little over a year and never owned an Epi/Gibson before with the tune-o-matic bridge.

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suggestion.... Be sure de-tune the strings to release the tension off the bridge when you make these adjustments.

 

you don't want or need to damage the screw slot or the threads on the stud posts.

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suggestion.... Be sure de-tune the strings to release the tension off the bridge when you make these adjustments.

 

you don't want or need to damage the screw slot or the threads on the stud posts.

 

I don't feel confident enough to take the step to fix it my self yet but I'll take your advice to hearth, when the time comes. I think i will take it back to the shop and have it adjusted. I called them and they said they'll fix it for no extra charge.

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I don't feel confident enough to take the step to fix it my self yet but I'll take your advice to hearth, when the time comes. I think i will take it back to the shop and have it adjusted. I called them and they said they'll fix it for no extra charge.

 

Good plan! this is an easy adjustment, but it's better to be careful so there's no regrets later.

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I pondered about it some time and came to the conclusion to do it myself. It is something I should learn some time or another. I bought a chromatic pedal tuner from Boss. I loosened the strings, raised the brige and started intonating.

 

The result Is really good. I fixed the muddy sound of the neck pickup too. It sounds very clean now. The muddy sound was probably caused by the fret noise.

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could also be the strings too close to your pickups. That alone can make a good set of pickups sound, not so good.

 

!!And now you're on your way!!

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Okay, adjusting the pickups. Is that a complicated procedure and everything can go wrong is it something I could do? Like do i have to remove a lot of stuff, like the pickup covers?

Now that you mention that, my low E-string still sounds a bit muddy with distortion while the pickup switch is at the rhythm setting. That is the neck pickup right?

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Try lowering the neck pickup until it is just above the plastic surround.

 

You can do that by using a cross-head/Philips type screwdriver. Looking down on the pickup from above, turn the two screws nearest to the pickup cover clockwise to raise and counter-clockwise to lower.

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Okay, adjusting the pickups. Is that a complicated procedure and everything can go wrong is it something I could do? Like do i have to remove a lot of stuff, like the pickup covers?

Now that you mention that, my low E-string still sounds a bit muddy with distortion while the pickup switch is at the rhythm setting. That is the neck pickup right?

 

yes, the Rhythm setting is the Neck pickup. I'd try dropping it a bit to see if it cleans up at all.

 

This is a very easy adjustment, you don't need to remove anything.

 

There should be two small Phillips head screws on each pickup's mounting ring. The are right in the middle on each side of the pickup. That is the screw to raise and lower the pickup height in relation to the string on the bass and treble sides

 

First thing to know is how to measure the gap from the bottom of the string to the screws in the pickup on the two E strings.

 

To measure, press down each e-string at the very last fret. You need a ruler that measures in 64s (for non metric guys like me). Measure from the screw that is under each E string to the bottom of the string. (this should be a flat head screw and each pickup has 6.) You don't need to touch screws under the strings, although, you CAN adjust those too if you feel like you want/need to get really fine in your tweaks.

 

The only adjustment you REALLY need to make to get started is with the small Phillips head screws that you'll find on the mounting ring.

 

As you turn them, you'll see that side of the pickup raise or lower, depending on how your turning the screw.

 

I usually go with 7/64s Low E, 6/64s high each as my starting point, then for each set of pickups, I set them to where I think I've found that pickups sweet spot.

 

When you've achieved some where around 7 ~ 8 /64s low E, 7 ~ 6 /64s high E, stop and see how they sound.

 

Then try to lower them a bit, check it again, Raise em up a bit, check it again. Have your amp set to a clean sound so there are no distractions like distortion, with out too much reverb.

 

Most of the time, the closer the string is to the pickup, the worse they will sound, there needs to be some room between the pickup and the string. hot pickups need to be set off the string a bit more.

 

if you google "humbucker height adjustments" you will find many links that explain this. Go to a few and review them, you'll get the gist of it in no time. here's one example: http://guitarmakersonline.com/pickup-height-adjustment-setup/

 

here's another from Seymore Duncan, which explains this in greater detail. Includes the reasoning behind adjusting the screws under the strings)

http://www.seymourduncan.com/blog/the-tone-garage/fine-tuning-the-adjustment-of-passive-humbuckers

 

 

also remember what ever you do here can be undone, you can always go back if you measure where they are right now.

 

And as with most adjustments as you work thru the setups for electric guitars, always start in small increments and take your time.

 

Most of the time the pickup setups involve just a few turns on the screws to lower or raise them. if your guitar is new, and hasn't been touched, the factory setup is probably pretty close to a good starting point. if it's been set by a previous owner, just set them to what your ears like, and you're done.

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yes, the Rhythm setting is the Neck pickup. I'd try dropping it a bit to see if it cleans up at all.

 

This is a very easy adjustment, you don't need to remove anything.

 

There should be two small Phillips head screws on each pickup's mounting ring. The are right in the middle on each side of the pickup. That is the screw to raise and lower the pickup height in relation to the string on the bass and treble sides

 

First thing to know is how to measure the gap from the bottom of the string to the screws in the pickup on the two E strings.

 

To measure, press down each e-string at the very last fret. You need a ruler that measures in 64s (for non metric guys like me). Measure from the screw that is under each E string to the bottom of the string. (this should be a flat head screw and each pickup has 6.) You don't need to touch screws under the strings, although, you CAN adjust those too if you feel like you want/need to get really fine in your tweaks.

 

The only adjustment you REALLY need to make to get started is with the small Phillips head screws that you'll find on the mounting ring.

 

As you turn them, you'll see that side of the pickup raise or lower, depending on how your turning the screw.

 

I usually go with 7/64s Low E, 6/64s high each as my starting point, then for each set of pickups, I set them to where I think I've found that pickups sweet spot.

 

When you've achieved some where around 7 ~ 8 /64s low E, 7 ~ 6 /64s high E, stop and see how they sound.

 

Then try to lower them a bit, check it again, Raise em up a bit, check it again. Have your amp set to a clean sound so there are no distractions like distortion, with out too much reverb.

 

Most of the time, the closer the string is to the pickup, the worse they will sound, there needs to be some room between the pickup and the string. hot pickups need to be set off the string a bit more.

 

if you google "humbucker height adjustments" you will find many links that explain this. Go to a few and review them, you'll get the gist of it in no time. here's one example: http://guitarmakersonline.com/pickup-height-adjustment-setup/

 

here's another from Seymore Duncan, which explains this in greater detail. Includes the reasoning behind adjusting the screws under the strings)

http://www.seymourduncan.com/blog/the-tone-garage/fine-tuning-the-adjustment-of-passive-humbuckers

 

 

also remember what ever you do here can be undone, you can always go back if you measure where they are right now.

 

And as with most adjustments as you work thru the setups for electric guitars, always start in small increments and take your time.

 

Most of the time the pickup setups involve just a few turns on the screws to lower or raise them. if your guitar is new, and hasn't been touched, the factory setup is probably pretty close to a good starting point. if it's been set by a previous owner, just set them to what your ears like, and you're done.

 

Thank you for such a detailed answer. It is all clear to me by how you explained it. I need to find a non-metric ruler (which is quite uncommon over here) but maybe I can get one specially made for guitars?

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Thank you for such a detailed answer. It is all clear to me by how you explained it. I need to find a non-metric ruler (which is quite uncommon over here) but maybe I can get one specially made for guitars?

 

 

You can use google to find sites to translate to imperial to metric

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Write down how many quarter-turns you turn each screw up or down when adjusting pickup height, so you can go back to square one if (when) you need to! You'll save DAYS!

 

As for the height of each bridge side, usually you want the high E a little closer to the fretboard than the low E, but by how much? I've found it varies. My Epi LP, they're fairly even. On my V, much less so. And they both play like I want them to.

 

Which brings us to the fact that you'll have to adjust pickup height on either side to match the bridge height on one particular side, so the volume's even. Here's what I do:

 

I play a power chord on D, G and B, another one on A, D and G, and yet another on E, A, and D, with only one pickup on, and adjust until the volume sounds about even. I do this for both pickups. This is of course tricky as the strings have different frequency ranges, but just go by ear. If it sounds right, it's right.

 

I cannot over-emphasize the need for writing down the starting point and the changes, or buying a ruler and writing down the starting point. That way, you're safe. Finding the sweet spot is, in my experience, a matter of dogged persistence and luck more than anything else, so you'll probably need to reset once in a while before you find it.

 

As for adjusting the individual poles on the pickups, I've never done that. I'd do more harm than good, I'm sure.

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Write down how many quarter-turns you turn each screw up or down when adjusting pickup height, so you can go back to square one if (when) you need to! You'll save DAYS!

 

As for the height of each bridge side, usually you want the high E a little closer to the fretboard than the low E, but by how much? I've found it varies. My Epi LP, they're fairly even. On my V, much less so. And they both play like I want them to.

 

Which brings us to the fact that you'll have to adjust pickup height on either side to match the bridge height on one particular side, so the volume's even. Here's what I do:

 

I play a power chord on D, G and B, another one on A, D and G, and yet another on E, A, and D, with only one pickup on, and adjust until the volume sounds about even. I do this for both pickups. This is of course tricky as the strings have different frequency ranges, but just go by ear. If it sounds right, it's right.

 

I cannot over-emphasize the need for writing down the starting point and the changes, or buying a ruler and writing down the starting point. That way, you're safe. Finding the sweet spot is, in my experience, a matter of dogged persistence and luck more than anything else, so you'll probably need to reset once in a while before you find it.

. As for adjusting the individual poles on the pickups, I've never done that. I'd do more harm than good, I'm sure.

 

Yeah I have gotten a ruler with inches now, and I can start back on scratch. I found out it really is hard to find the right position :S And by ear, I don't have much to compare what it should sound like, but I can measure the volume with a mixer. I think the bridge pickup sounds perfectly fine, and I haven't done any adjustments to it yet. But I might need to as I raised the bridge on the low E side.

 

I wont touch the individual string poles for now. Probably not necessary for a novice guitarist like myself.

 

I also red on several forum boards that the neck pickup will never sound as good for palm muted power chords as well, so maybe I am chasing the impossible with my current guitars?

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I also red on several forum boards that the neck pickup will never sound as good for palm muted power chords as well, so maybe I am chasing the impossible with my current guitars?

 

I agree, as it's not the right "tone" selection for that kind of playing. You need to top end bite of the bridge pickup, the front/neck pickup just isn't going to respond to the string/picking dynamics. For palm muted rhythms, the bridge pickup is the right choice.

 

Just as any FYI, Typically the bridge pickup will be hotter, (more output) than the neck since the strings move much less as the strings are closer to the saddle/bridge where the termination point is. Over the neck pickup, strings are much further away the strings move/oscillate more. So they usually crank up the ohms on the bridge pup to compensate.

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Hi! It is good that you are learning how to work on your guitar. I do believe that proper guitar setup should be done by the owner.

 

A good base line in setting up pickup height is to place 1 US quarter between the pickup pole piece and the string for the bridge (2 quarter for the neck) while holding the string at the last fret. The quarter should be barely touching the string. Use this as a baseline, adding or reducing the height to taste. Hope this helps.

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