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Searching for a way to replace a stop bar bridge with an ABR type.


Dynadude

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My old SG has the inserts and studs for the stop bar bridge, and I've always wanted to replace it with an ABR type, or the wider type found on the '70s SGs.

 

The problem is the width of the spacing for the studs. The spacing for the Stop Bar type is wider, and I have not been able to find any bridges that are designed to work with the extra width. The studs are secondary in importance, as they can be easily fabricated, or it may be that the studs made for the narrower bridges would work, so that is not really a problem.

 

I have always had to settle for the Wrap type bridges, and it has always been a problem. They do not work well with the addition of a stop bar, like my guitar has. I have remedied the rocking problem by adding set screws to the outsides of the bridge slots, but I still want to be rid of the slotted bridge all together. It would give the guitar a much cleaner look.

 

Does anyone here know of a way around this? Seen a bridge somewhere that might work with the wider spacing?

 

Here's a pic so you can see the problem.

 

Dsc002002.jpg

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Dynadude, I think I'd be tempted to go for this. I think it would be a shame to remove and plug the original stop bar inserts.

 

1966_SG_Special_1.jpg

 

Do you want to change the bridge because your present one is not solidly located ? If this is the case, you could get some replacement stop bar screws (I think they would be 3/8 " imperial thread), and grind away the collar so they act like conventional screws. Then you could tighten them down which would clamp your bridge firmly after you had set the intonation. You would need washers to sit over the inserts to give you the correct bridge height. The bridge would be clamped between the screw heads and the washers. Once you had fine tuned the height by using different washers, you could measure the thickness of them, and cut an appropriate alloy spacer for each side. This would look much neater than washers.

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When I was doing repair - we would:

 

* remove the existing wrap around bridge thread inserts

* install wood dowel plugs

* carefully find the location to drill new holes for Nashville T.O.M. Bridge studs or ABR-1 Screws

* Drill holes and insert the threaded inserts for the Nashville bridge

* attach the Nashville bridge

* Intonate the guitar

 

 

A local Luthier should be able to perform the work

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When I was doing repair - we would:

 

* remove the existing wrap around bridge thread inserts

* install wood dowel plugs

* carefully find the location to drill new holes for Nashville T.O.M. Bridge studs or ABR-1 Screws

* Drill holes and insert the threaded inserts for the Nashville bridge

* attach the Nashville bridge

* Intonate the guitar

 

 

A local Luthier should be able to perform the work

 

 

Dynadude... if you go through the operation of having a luthier add a TOM bridge and stop tailpiece.... go with ABR-1 bridge... not the (imo - crappy - ) Nashville bridge...

 

 

peace

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A appreciate the replies fellas, but I was really hoping that there was a way to replace this bridge without altering the guitar. I just can't go that far. It's seen too many changes already.

 

I have an idea I'm planning to try. It's going to involve a little engineering, and I'll let you all know how it turns out.

 

I may have found another patent worthy idea. We'll see.

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Dynadude' date=' I think I'd be tempted to go for this. I think it would be a shame to remove and plug the original stop bar inserts.

 

[img']http://i523.photobucket.com/albums/w352/marscape1/1966_SG_Special_1.jpg[/img]

 

Do you want to change the bridge because your present one is not solidly located ? If this is the case, you could get some replacement stop bar screws (I think they would be 3/8 " imperial thread), and grind away the collar so they act like conventional screws. Then you could tighten them down which would clamp your bridge firmly after you had set the intonation. You would need washers to sit over the inserts to give you the correct bridge height. The bridge would be clamped between the screw heads and the washers. Once you had fine tuned the height by using different washers, you could measure the thickness of them, and cut an appropriate alloy spacer for each side. This would look much neater than washers.

 

I really want to replace it for aestetics. I have it stabilised. The guitar stays in tune as well as any I've ever played, but it looks rather odd with the slotted bridge and a tailpiece.

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Here's what I can tell from the picture of your guitar. From the marks and filled holes already showing below the tailpiece your guitar originally (or in a previous life) had a Bigsby with the "lightning bolt" bridge. The was the same setup as used with a Maestro also, on SG and Firebird models. It is understandable to want to replace the lightning bolt bridge with something that is adjustable as their intonation was not designed for the light guage plain "G" strings that became so popular in the mid to late sixties.

 

One of the first repacements for the lightning bolt bridge was the Leo Quan Badass, this may be what is on your guitar. They were designed to be a direct replacement for the large stud mounted wrap-around, but fully adjustable. It could be used as an all-in-one wrap-around bridge/tailpiece, or as an over-the-top bridge for use with a Bigsby or Maestro. These were/are very good bridges, in fact they give you more room for adjustment than an ABR-1 or Nashville Tune-O Matic does.

 

The probelms began with your guitar when the TP-6 stop tailpiece was added. It is not needed and serves no function (other than the micro-tuning feature). In fact there are schools of thought that say you get better sustain and body resonance with only the wrap-around. In your current setup the bridge seems loose BECAUSE of the TP-6 stopbar. This bridge when used as a wrap-around will not be loose, it will have the full tension of all the strings pushing it down, and pulling it forward. It can not, and will not, be loose or move when properly adjusted.

 

The answer to your problem is not to add or change what you have, but to simply remove the TP-6 stopbar and studs, restring your guitar wrap-around style with the bridge you have and I think you will be amazed at the difference.

 

Modifications to the guitar or hardware, zero. Total cost, $0 (OK maybe $5 for a new set of strings), and it will take you less than thirty minutes to do. Give it a try and report back.

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Here's what I can tell from the picture of your guitar. From the marks and filled holes already showing below the tailpiece your guitar originally (or in a previous life) had a Bigsby with the "lightning bolt" bridge. The was the same setup as used with a Maestro also' date=' on SG and Firebird models. It is understandable to want to replace the lightning bolt bridge with something that is adjustable as their intonation was not designed for the light guage plain "G" strings that became so popular in the mid to late sixties.

 

One of the first repacements for the lightning bolt bridge was the Leo Quan Badass, this may be what is on your guitar. They were designed to be a direct replacement for the large stud mounted wrap-around, but fully adjustable. It could be used as an all-in-one wrap-around bridge/tailpiece, or as an over-the-top bridge for use with a Bigsby or Maestro. These were/are very good bridges, in fact they give you more room for adjustment than an ABR-1 or Nashville Tune-O Matic does.

 

The probelms began with your guitar when the TP-6 stop tailpiece was added. It is not needed and serves no function (other than the micro-tuning feature). In fact there are schools of thought that say you get better sustain and body resonance with only the wrap-around. In your current setup the bridge seems loose BECAUSE of the TP-6 stopbar. This bridge when used as a wrap-around will not be loose, it will have the full tension of all the strings pushing it down, and pulling it forward. It can not, and will not, be loose or move when properly adjusted.

 

The answer to your problem is not to add or change what you have, but to simply remove the TP-6 stopbar and studs, restring your guitar wrap-around style with the bridge you have and I think you will be amazed at the difference.

 

Modifications to the guitar or hardware, zero. Total cost, $0 (OK maybe $5 for a new set of strings), and it will take you less than thirty minutes to do. Give it a try and report back.

 

[/quote']

 

 

While I appreciate all the time and effort for your reply, I must make it clear that I wish to retain the current setup, and simply replace the bridge with a more appropriate style.

 

Once again, I think I have a solution, but it will take a little time to produce the parts. I'll update the progress here, if anyone wants to check the outcome.

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