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E-minor7

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Actually the skinny neck was one of the main reason I got the 1965. :)

 

The neck carve is one of the reasons you will never get my wife's 1960 J-200 out of her hands. Not a good or a bad thing - just personal preference.

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My '67 J45 has the narrow nut but a very deep and chunky neck. I have huge hands and still get on with it just fine. I agree about the sound being infectious, I love mine. It's sort of aggressive but sweet at the same time, like a loyal guard dog. Eagerly awaiting your report on your new arrival Em7!

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No doubt 45' can be labeled one of the most iconic and praised acoustics on the planet ever. And they more than often live up to the reputation.

Still the model isn't that easy to fine-catagorize and digging one step deeper, it must be stated that they are quite an ambiguous phenomenon.

 

Born out of the J-35 and Jumbo family as early as 1942, they have traveled though many a period and the ones known from today's Montana-line only hold a vague genetic connection to their legendary ancestors : The Banners we rate so high and got familiar with fx on these pages.

Those war-horses, , , or should we say work-horses were/are raw and strong - almost like representing the naked americana itself.

Intriguing and important to remember they at the same time carry a velvet layer through that single ring hole. Check them out and you see the point.

 

But soon the 1950's started and the 45's developed into something gentler. It was as if they came down from the farm-fence and entered some softer lounge.

If listening to the first-half 1950's J-45's on the Tube, you'll notice the difference. I certainly hear in my 53'er, which totally stood out from the rough 1950'er it replaced.

Not saying it's without the original 'simple' core, but an extra side was added - a dimension in there is cultivated.

By 1955 they changed again. This time into thicker bracing, which kind of concentrated or in some cases locked the voice down.

Ask my 59'er and it'll tell the story.

 

Before anyone knew it a new decade was about to open and Kalamazoo boldly kept the stack smoking.

Far from bein' asleep, rather high by writing 1960 and inventing the incredible Hummingbird, the plant left the black-yellowish burst behind and went J-45-cherry like a piece of cake.

They also suggested something wilder. In '63 they slipped the ceramic or wooden adjustable saddle-insert introduced in the late 50's into a , , , ,

HOLLOW polythene bridge ! , , , like the ones used on the new Birds, SJ's CW's.

What-alert !?! , , , still only a minority of the audience seemed to bother - you readers of course get the picture. Horrendous - and it didn't last long.

Only a year later Gibson wisely returned to old rosewood round the pins. For this short visit into modernity should prove to be one of the biggest mistakes ever made in the history of acoustic instruments, , , eeehh, according to historians, sonic scientists and later general guitar consensus.

The logic was obvious - a wooden instrument needs solid wood to transfer the vibrations decently, , , not an empty shell of (C2H4)n, , , right. .

Well, probably.

 

Never the less those fast times made of plastic for a brief while held the trumpet and the result remains here and there to this day.

Microscopic Gibson-me now is a part of that momentum. Decided to listen'n'feel for myself and this August the stars stood right.

Knew it was hazardous, but an incarnated shop-fellow in Denmark Street once told me some of these were gold and even a child would have seen he meant it.

 

> Click <

 

Here's the 1963'er -

 

First - I plain adore the look of the faded red bleeding into the heavy oranged yellow. So mojoed funky.

The way it meets the red-toned hog sides by the cream-binding border even better.

Second - It's an 11/16 nut and everything aboard is original. Perhaps even the black plast-pins.

B-plate is unharmed, so are the braces. Then a lower-bout plug-hole at the size of a bullet.

 

Third - It came with a bone insert, but the authentic ceramic saddle plus metal-plate were in the case.

This was vital and the deal wouldn't have gone down without it.

 

Put on straight D'Addario EJ 16's and began A/B/C'ing. Bone - Ceramic - Ceramic w. plate back and forth several times.

 

The bone was louder, the most potent, providing more core. Regardless the choice fell on the ceramic-metal-plate combo as it gave that special softy-splashy yet crisp thing I am after.

Oh yes, , , there is an overall plast-bi-flavor. Exactly that has a a sub-quality of its completely own. Very far from the 1940's ancestors, JT serves us so well,

but in an thrilling modern-turned-vintage-way ooozing something sensual and forbidden.

You can feel a slight sleaze and I say it again : The cherry slope rox.

It answers on the spot though this ex - perhaps others as well - has a veil of compression, which is heard and felt during sudden right-hand attacks.

 

If the Banners are all genuine honesty, quarter-artificial pop-artistry would be the words for the 63'ers.

A bit shameless they are, still an almost sophisticated elegance sings from the G-string and down.

Surely the bass is the father, but the mid'n'trebs come like clean buttercups if you want it.

I might not and lower the action to a minimum - fine-adjust between the truss rod and the white clay screws to a degree where the 6-7-8 upper frets actually choke (the neck has an age-prob there).

 

Normal people would think I am bananas, but this is not for laymen of deafies, , , and the absolutely right doze of buzz for both fingers and strums takes time.

A lot of players would interrupt and dismiss - "rose is better !".

Okay, , , I'd understand if this was my only acoustic, but it ain't and now is the time for tripping.

Lords of flat-picking, here I come.

 

Hard to express what's goin' on so I won't try much longer. Not sure it would make any sense.

 

But no, BK777 and zomb - the kitsch-concept stays where it is.

It incites me so bad and I yearn to hear it recorded, , , which means, yes, Sal and bbg - there will be sound available at some point.

Hopefully within 14 days. What the heck will happen there. . .

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The photo offered up in your friend’s garden, with the top partially obscured by dappled light on the ’63, is as much a teaser as the cryptic post #1- any chance of another photo(?). The reds that typically adorn modern maple Hummingbirds are just too red; those diluted-by-time iced tea bursts such as the ’63 shown would really be the only way I could do one of those ’60’s reds.

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The photo offered up in your friend's garden, with the top partially obscured by dappled light on the '63, is as much a teaser as the cryptic post #1-

Absolutely agree – Gibson guitars can get too red and the early 60's cherries would have been hard to handle.

Both 45's and Birds.

However after 40-50 years serious pigment and lacquer change, they become close to what I consider my favorite top hue.

Did you take your name from those. .

 

Examples of re-issued adjustable bridged tea-tops or faded cherries have been created in recent times.

 

He's a Custom Shop.

 

https://reverb.com/i...m-shop-j-45-adj

 

 

My new one is more orange-brown when not exposed to direct sunlight. You'll see on a coming photo.

Indoor it is more even, not much yellow left.

And outdoors with clouds covering the sun, it gets down as well. Btw. it's my garden, burst62.

 

Congratulations Sir !

I can't wait to here it...

 

Thanks - neither can I.

The recording will be done w. broken in strings.

 

 

 

 

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Did you take your name from those. . .

 

The "62burst" was more of a Fender reference from electric days gone by, but does double duty in Gibsonland as far as the faded iced tea bursts of the early '60's go, "these are a few of my favorite bursts". . .

 

 

 

The recording will be done w. broken in strings.

We'll patiently be awaiting any new photos and sound clips with aged strings. . . maybe you can go into the guitar shop again and wrangle some used wires ; ).

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It may send you off and over that edge, but here is another one on Reverb.com:

A nice 1 - the fret-board seems yellow-flamed - and it's in slightly better shape than mine (no issue). .

I really like these faded early 60's guitars. The 2 ceramic saddled rosewood bridged 64'ers I have tried were excellent.

 

That look, , , but not least the response'n'projection present something special.

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Funny you should mention the black plastic bridge pins. My '64 J45 which I posted here recently also had the plastic bridge and black pins, so I'm guessing they are original for the period. Nice guitar, very similar fading colour to mine

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Funny you should mention the black plastic bridge pins. My '64 J45 which I posted here recently also had the plastic bridge and black pins, so I'm guessing they are original for the period. Nice guitar, very similar fading colour to mine

A bit of research tells me the pins were black.

And yes, I recall the midsummer thread - http://forum.gibson....ins-the-family/ - and took down your delicate double-pic for the archive.

 

Btw. you said something about "some sound samples".

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A bit of research tells me the pins were black.

And yes, I recall the midsummer thread - http://forum.gibson....ins-the-family/ - and took down your delicate double-pic for the archive.

 

Btw. you said something about "some sound samples".

 

Yes, I did say something like that. But a couple of things are holding me back:

 

1) Equipment. I'm not sure how to do it and up-load it here. I only have an iPhone

2) Stage fright. I'd hate to make an *** of myself

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Original ceramic saddle?

 

And be aware that some lift in the rear middle of the plastic bridge is totally okay, as the bolt-headed screw in the middle is in front of the pins (along with a second middle screw in front of the saddle, and two outer screws just east & west of the pins).

 

If for any reason you think you need to tighten those screws, do so very gingerly, as they can easily be over-tightened & strip out or crack the plastic. Stop as soon as you feel resistance.

 

Btw, congrats on what looks to be a real sweetheart !!!

 

And, as if by magic, here is a close-up of the underside of a 60s Gibson plastic bridge to illustrate what you describe

 

Ankt98I.jpg

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Yes, I did say something like that. But a couple of things are holding me back:

 

"Don't be denied"

 

 

 

And, as if by magic, here is a close-up of the underside of a 60s Gibson plastic bridge to illustrate what you describe

Oouh, , , almost a poster of controversy. One can hear it scream, "strrrrange". .

I recently read about a fellow who had filled it up with fluent pvc. Rather bold midway to choose.

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"Don't be denied"

 

 

 

Oouh, , , almost a poster of controversy. One can hear it scream, "strrrrange". .

I recently read about a fellow who had filled it up with fluent pvc. Rather bold midway to choose.

 

The plastic bridge on my '64 Texan is showing some lift at the back (about enough to slide a piece of paper under) but I'm confident in the knowledge that it ain't going anywhere thanks to those bolts.

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