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Rosewood vs. Ebony For Bridge


Victory Pete
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Can't vote because I do not give a flip if a flattop bridge is ebony or rosewood. I have no gripe with either of them. I do prefer Braz rosewood because I like they way they look. But there are way too many variables involved in what makes sound come out of a guitar to overthink it by trying to narrow it down to what wood the bridge is made of.

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Can't vote because I do not give a flip if a flattop bridge is ebony or rosewood. I have no gripe with either of them. I do prefer Braz rosewood because I like they way they look. But there are way too many variables involved in what makes sound come out of a guitar to overthink it by trying to narrow it down to what wood the bridge is made of.

 

Okay fine, then you can run along, nothing for you to see here.

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I am confused. You are comparing tone on what appears to be a cheap nylon string classical, with bridges that are not even in glued contact with the top and strings that do not attach to the bridge. And you're playing with a flat pick on nylon stings, which not many of us do. And picking close to the bridge. This is nothing like the tone you would normally seek or get out of a classical guitar.

 

How can you relate this to what you might hear on a steel-string, x-braced, high-quality flat top with bridges that are glued to the top and strings that are held in place with pins?

 

Not sure this is a meaningful comparison in a way that any of us can relate to.

 

When you can take the same D-28 with an ebony bridge, then remove that bridge and replace it with a rosewood bridge (with the same saddle and same strings) and repeat this test, the comparison may have meaning.

 

Otherwise, it proves bugger all.

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Fascinating poll but I'm unclear of the utility of it. If we all vote for ebony (or rosewood), so what? It's not going to change how builders view or use the woods. J45nick's observation is spot on; There are so many other variables involved in a guitar's sound that asking "ebony vs. rosewood bridge" in a vacuum makes little sense.

 

And I'll save you the trouble of telling me to "run along." I'll do it all on my own.

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This is an interesting adjunct to our previous chat about damping/impedance of Ebony vs Rosewood.

 

In this instance, I don’t hear a discernible difference between the two at all-although I think with a nylon strung guitar, the dominant effector of tone is the strings, so the bridge is less of a decisive factor in tone production.

 

Certainly with a steel strung flat top, I can appreciate the difference. I hear Ebony as tighter, more defined and harder sounding, which I think is why something like a D28 sounds so articulate for Bluegrass. I certainly hear Rosewood as a more warm and open bridge material, and I feel a different response from the Braz bridge on my 1990 Hummingbird than I do from the EIR bridges on my other Gibsons. Braz has a softer response but is more tactile.

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I'll give it a shot. If I was doing a custom guitar and had a choice between these two woods, with no significant price difference, I would go with ebony. My personal thinking would be that it is a harder wood, and hence more durable. I would also assume that a dense wood transmits vibration better. However, I would only pick it if I could have the fingerboard made of ebony too. I like to see bridge and fingerboard made out of the same wood.

 

With all that said, in a blind test, I very much doubt that I could hear a difference...

 

Lars

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Agree will all of the above. Guitar sounds better with a bridge.

 

J/K of course... I found this video amazing, even though indeed it does not mean much. Bridge unglued, no clue wether the action is exactely the same for both bridges, what saddle materials are etc... Mic positionning also differ since you hold it in your hand.

Many things impact the sound here.

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I am confused. You are comparing tone on what appears to be a cheap nylon string classical, with bridges that are not even in glued contact with the top and strings that do not attach to the bridge. And you're playing with a flat pick on nylon stings, which not many of us do. And picking close to the bridge. This is nothing like the tone you would normally seek or get out of a classical guitar.

 

How can you relate this to what you might hear on a steel-string, x-braced, high-quality flat top with bridges that are glued to the top and strings that are held in place with pins?

 

Not sure this is a meaningful comparison in a way that any of us can relate to.

 

When you can take the same D-28 with an ebony bridge, then remove that bridge and replace it with a rosewood bridge (with the same saddle and same strings) and repeat this test, the comparison may have meaning.

 

Otherwise, it proves bugger all.

 

Nope, it does show the deference between the woods if you listen carefully.

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Well, of course - it's the original ceramic version.

. . . . . . . . . . The forbidden combo

 

Okay, so no matter what your bridge is made from you are going to get the same sound. The porcelain saddle is held up by the metal studs and if it is like most of those units it is all the way down anyway, so you got porcelain right on the metal bushings in the spruce top. Sorry if my assumptions are incorrect.

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Okay, so no matter what your bridge is made from you are going to get the same sound. The porcelain saddle is held up by the metal studs and if it is like most of those units it is all the way down anyway, so you got porcelain right on the metal bushings in the spruce top. Sorry if my assumptions are incorrect.

Not sure what you mean by 'the same sound'.

Apart from that, like in most of my other adjustables, I lower the saddle to full top-contact and in this case choose not to remove the long rectangular metal-plate.

The idea is to keep the weight in there as the plastic is so light.

 

My main-philosophy is not to get things as light as possible, but to combine the components to a sonic maximum.

A much more complicated, yet equally challenging and eventually satisfying goal.

 

Here and for now I wanna stay as loyal to original Kalamazoo as possible in order to investigate this controversial plast/porcelain concept.

Still the last 14 days were spent with heavy nut-experimentation.

More of that later as the tests are rolling as we speak.

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Not sure what you mean by 'the same sound'.

Apart from that, like in most of my other adjustables, I lower the saddle to full top-contact and in this case choose not to remove the long rectangular metal-plate.

The idea is to keep the weight in there as the plastic is so light.

 

My main-philosophy is not to get things as light as possible, but to combine the components to a sonic maximum.

A much more complicated, yet equally challenging and eventually satisfying goal.

 

Here and for now I wanna stay as loyal to original Kalamazoo as possible in order to investigate this controversial plast/porcelain concept.

Still the last 14 days were spent with heavy nut-experimentation.

More of that later as the tests are rolling as we speak.

 

What I mean is this: As long as you have a porcelain saddle either held up by the threaded screws or all the way down, the bridge material makes very little if any difference. The saddle does not rest on the bridge, it rests on either the screws or directly on the studs that are in the top.The strings energy is not going through any of the bridge.

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