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Southern Jumbo


generaldreedle

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Hey guys, tried a southern jumbo at the local store recently. 2018 traditional, whatever that means. Anyway it sounds great, different than the J45, but what I could find out about it here says it's just a j45 with bling. What do sj owners like about this guitar and is it really only cosmetic differences with the J45 because it didn't sound like it.

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Is there a difference - good question.

The common knowledge says it a blinged up J-45, yes, , , and 45's varied over the eras. But could there be more.

 

There is a parallel between the D-28's and D-45's from Nazareth about which some say the latter has a more crisp shine to it due to all the abalone.

Hmmm, , , aha. .

(apart from the fact the new ones are scalloped)

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Up through the 1950s Gibson tended to use better quality woods on the SJ. With Bozeman-made stock guitars though I doubt there is any difference other than cosmetics. It was probably just luck of the draw. You could have played another SJ the next day you would not have liked as much as the J-45 sitting there. On the other hand, I know folks who will swear all day long that the Kristofferson and Guthrie SJs stand out from the crowd.

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The bridges are different. The SJ has its pins closer to the saddle and has a sharper break angle. This does not mean it is louder, saddle height off of the top determines that, it does change the initial picking attack though making for a tighter and brighter sound while strumming and picking.

 

 

I’ve never heard that before

 

Different bridges ? Really ?

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The bridges are different. The SJ has its pins closer to the saddle and has a sharper break angle. This does not mean it is louder, saddle height off of the top determines that, it does change the initial picking attack though making for a tighter and brighter sound while strumming and picking.

The super jumbo did sound brighter and tighter, interesting.

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I'm really not in to it to know if the descriptions below are different than the standard but's here's a couple SJ's I have.

 

 

 

 

Dwight Yaokam Honky Tonk Deuce

 

Bracing

Every acoustic guitar made by Gibson features hand-scalloped, radiused top bracing inside the body, a feature normally found only in limited run, hand-made guitars. By scalloping each brace by hand, the natural sound of the acoustic is focused more toward the center of the body, enhancing the instrument’s sound projection. The Dwight Yoakam Honky Tonk Deuce Signature Artist Series acoustic features a variation of Gibson’s “X” bracing pattern situated behind the soundhole, with a set of tall and thin braces for the back, and scalloped tall and thin braces for the top. This traditional bracing design—the same pattern found in Gibson’s legendary J-45 from the early 1940s—delivers a balanced expression, with punchy, deep lows, warm mids, and clear, crisp highs. When pushed for more volume, the Dwight Yoakam Honky Tonk projects a natural compression, which helps it blend nicely with any accompaniment.

 

 

 

 

Kristofferson SJ

 

Bracing

 

Every acoustic guitar made by Gibson features hand-scalloped, radiused top bracing inside the body, a feature normally found only in limited run, hand-made guitars. By scalloping each brace by hand, the natural sound of the acoustic is focused more toward the center of the body, enhancing the instrument’s sound projection. The Kristofferson features a variation of Gibson’s “X” bracing pattern situated behind the soundhole, with a set of tall and thin braces for the back, and scalloped tall and thin braces for the top. This legendary bracing design — exactly as it appeared in the first Southern Jumbo in 1942 — delivers a balanced expression, with punchy, deep lows, warm mids, and clear, crisp highs. When pushed for more volume, The Kristofferson projects a natural compression, which helps it blend nicely with any accompaniment.

 

 

 

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While I could be dead wrong, the description of the bracing for the Yaokam and Kristofferson SJs sounds pretty much the same as that used in the J45 TV.

 

I would think the only guitar that Gibson has issued with a non-standard bracing would have been the L-00 Legend. If accurate, it would have the tall, thin un-scalloped top bracing which would, for me, be the main reason to buy one.

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Different bridges ? Really ?

I first noticed the SJ's difference in bridge pin placement back in 1999, while obsessing over details in a newly released Gibson acoustic catalog. It was the only belly-up bridge in that catalog to have the more forward pin placement.

 

Over the years, I've noticed the use of this bridge on a number of other Montana instruments, primarily from the '90s. But on the SJ, I've seen it on Kalamazoo production as well, and have always wondered what drove Gibson to change the pin placement on this particular model.

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'Just returned from looking at other sites, as well as the above links. . . well, I'll be damned- you're right. And I know you won't let that go to your head, right? ; )

Surprised me too - never shared it a thought, , , , and there are exceptions.

But hep for Pete.

 

No, I know when I am right.

All fine, in fact great - as long as you accept when you are wrong

 

 

 

 

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